LINGUISTICS, LANGUAGE AND CULTURAL STUDIES CONFERENCE


Linguistics, Language and Cultural Studies Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Linguistics, Language and Cultural Studies is a conference track under the Humanities and Social Science Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Humanities and Social Science.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Humanities and Social Science).

Linguistics, Language and Cultural Studies is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Linguistics, Language and Cultural Studies Conference Track will be held at “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2020” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2020” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2020” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Paris, France in July 2020” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in New York, United States in August 2020” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2020” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2020” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2020” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2020” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2020” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2020” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2021” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2021” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2021” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2021” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2021” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Paris, France in July 2021” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in New York, United States in August 2021” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2021” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2021” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2021” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2021” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2021” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2021” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2021” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Paris, France in December 2021” .

Linguistics, Language and Cultural Studies is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

VII. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

VIII. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

IX. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

X. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

XI. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

XII. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20HSSC09JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIII. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20HSSC09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIV. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 22, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20HSSC10ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XV. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20HSSC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVI. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20HSSC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVII. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20HSSC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20HSSC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIX. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20HSSC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XX. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline January 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HSSC02GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XX. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline January 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HSSC02GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXI. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline March 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HSSC04ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXII. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 01, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HSSC05TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIII. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 06, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HSSC06US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIV. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline June 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HSSC07FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXV. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2021
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline July 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HSSC08US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVI. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2021
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HSSC09JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVII. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2021
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HSSC09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVIII. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 22, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HSSC10ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIX. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HSSC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXX. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HSSC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXI. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2021
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HSSC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXII. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2021
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HSSC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXIII. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HSSC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder
FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

V. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

FINISHED

VI. INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

Humanities and Social Science Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Linguistics, Language and Cultural Studies Conference"

  • Cultural Effects on the Performance of Non- Profit and For-Profit Microfinance Institutions
    Authors: Patrick M. Stanton, William R. McCumber, Keywords: Hofstede cultural dimensions, international finance, microfinance institutions, non-profit. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Using a large dataset of more than 2,400 individual microfinance institutions (MFIs) from 120 countries from 1999 to 2016, this study finds that nearly half of the international MFIs operate as for-profit institutions. Formal institutions (business regulatory environment, property rights, social protection, and a developed financial sector) impact the likelihood of MFIs being for-profit across countries. Cultural differences across countries (power distance, individualism, masculinity, and indulgence) seem to be a factor in the legal status of the MFI (non-profit or for-profit). MFIs in countries with stronger formal institutions, a greater degree of power distance, and a higher degree of collectivism experience better financial and social performance.
  • Garden Culture in Islamic Civilization: A Glance at the Birth, Development and Current Situation
    Authors: Parisa Göker, Keywords: Islamic civilization, Islamic architecture, cultural landscape, Islamic garden. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: With the birth of Islam, the definitions of paradise in Quran have spread across three continents since 7th century, showing itself in the palace gardens as a reflection of Islamic Culture. The design characteristics of Islamic gardens come forth with the influence of religious beliefs, as well as taking its form as per the cultural, climatic and soil characteristics of its geography, and showing its difference. It is possible to see these differences from the garden examples that survived to present time from the civilizations in the lands of Islamic proliferation. The main material of this research is the Islamic gardens in Iran and Spain. Field study was carried out in Alhambra Palace in Spain, Granada and Shah Goli garden in Iran, Tabriz. In this study, the birth of Islamic gardens, spatial perception of paradise, design principles, spatial structure, along with the structural/plantation materials used are examined. Also the characteristics and differentiation of the gardens examined in different cultures and geographies have been revealed. In the conclusion section, Iran and Spain Islamic garden samples were evaluated and their properties were determined.
  • Words of Peace in the Speeches of the Egyptian President, Abdulfattah El-Sisi: A Corpus-Based Study
    Authors: Mohamed S. Negm, Waleed S. Mandour, Keywords: Corpus-assisted discourse studies, critical discourse analysis, collocation network, corpus linguistics. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The present study aims primarily at investigating words of peace (lexemes of peace) in the formal speeches of the Egyptian president Abdulfattah El-Sisi in a two-year span of time, from 2018 to 2019. This paper attempts to shed light not only on the contextual use of the antonyms, war and peace, but also it underpins quantitative analysis through the current methods of corpus linguistics. As such, the researchers have deployed a corpus-based approach in collecting, encoding, and processing 30 presidential speeches over the stated period (23,411 words and 25,541 tokens in total). Further, semantic fields and collocational networkzs are identified and compared statistically. Results have shown a significant propensity of adopting peace, including its relevant collocation network, textually and therefore, ideationally, at the expense of war concept which in most cases surfaces euphemistically through the noun conflict. The president has not justified the action of war with an honorable cause or a valid reason. Such results, so far, have indicated a positive sociopolitical mindset the Egyptian president possesses and moreover, reveal national and international fair dealing on arising issues.
  • Investigating Iraqi EFL University Students' Productive Knowledge of Grammatical Collocations in English
    Authors: Adnan Z. Mkhelif, Keywords: Corpus linguistics, frequency, grammatical collocations, L2 vocabulary learning, productive knowledge, proficiency, transparency. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Grammatical collocations (GCs) are word combinations containing a preposition or a grammatical structure, such as an infinitive (e.g. smile at, interested in, easy to learn, etc.). Such collocations tend to be difficult for Iraqi EFL university students (IUS) to master. To help address this problem, it is important to identify the factors causing it. This study aims at investigating the effects of L2 proficiency, frequency of GCs and their transparency on IUSs’ productive knowledge of GCs. The study involves 112 undergraduate participants with different proficiency levels, learning English in formal contexts in Iraq. The data collection instruments include (but not limited to) a productive knowledge test (designed by the researcher using the British National Corpus (BNC)), as well as the grammar part of the Oxford Placement Test (OPT). The study findings have shown that all the above-mentioned factors have significant effects on IUSs’ productive knowledge of GCs. In addition to establishing evidence of which factors of L2 learning might be relevant to learning GCs, it is hoped that the findings of the present study will contribute to more effective methods of teaching that can better address and help overcome the problems IUSs encounter in learning GCs. The study is thus hoped to have significant theoretical and pedagogical implications for researchers, syllabus designers as well as teachers of English as a foreign/second language.
  • Observatory of Sustainability of the Algarve Region for Tourism: Proposal for Environmental and Sociocultural Indicators
    Authors: Miguel José Oliveira, Fátima Farinha, Elisa M. J. da Silva, Rui Lança, Manuel Duarte Pinheiro, Cátia Miguel, Keywords: Sustainability, observatory, environmental indicators, sociocultural indicators, development, tourism, Algarve. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3461984 Abstract: The Observatory of Sustainability of the Algarve Region for Tourism (OBSERVE) will be a valuable tool to assess the sustainability of this region. The OBSERVE tool is designed to provide data and maintain an up-to-date, consistent set of indicators defined to describe the region on the environmental, sociocultural, economic and institutional domains. This ongoing two-year project has the active participation of the Algarve’s stakeholders, since they were consulted and asked to participate in the discussion for the indicators proposal. The environmental and sociocultural indicators chosen must indicate the characteristics of the region and should be in alignment with other global systems used to monitor the sustainability. This paper presents a review of sustainability indicators systems that support the first proposal for the environmental and sociocultural indicators. Others constraints are discussed, namely the existing data and the data available in digital platforms in a format suitable for automatic importation to the platform of OBSERVE. It is intended that OBSERVE will be a valuable tool to assess the sustainability of the region of Algarve.
  • How Children Synchronize with Their Teacher: Evidence from a Real-World Elementary School Classroom
    Authors: Reiko Yamamoto, Keywords: Movement synchrony, teacher–child relationships, English as a foreign language, EFL learning. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: This paper reports on how synchrony occurs between children and their teacher, and what prevents or facilitates synchrony. The aim of the experiment conducted in this study was to precisely analyze their movements and synchrony and reveal the process of synchrony in a real-world classroom. Specifically, the experiment was conducted for around 20 minutes during an English as a foreign language (EFL) lesson. The participants were 11 fourth-grade school children and their classroom teacher in a public elementary school in Japan. Previous researchers assert that synchrony causes the state of flow in a class. For checking the level of flow, Short Flow State Scale (SFSS) was adopted. The experimental procedure had four steps: 1) The teacher read aloud the first half of an English storybook to the children. Both the teacher and the children were at their own desks. 2) The children were subjected to an SFSS check. 3) The teacher read aloud the remaining half of the storybook to the children. She made the children remove their desks before reading. 4) The children were again subjected to an SFSS check. The movements of all participants were recorded with a video camera. From the movement analysis, it was found that the children synchronized better with the teacher in Step 3 than in Step 1, and that the teacher’s movement became free and outstanding without a desk. This implies that the desk acted as a barrier between the children and the teacher. Removal of this barrier resulted in the children’s reactions becoming synchronized with those of the teacher. The SFSS results proved that the children experienced more flow without a barrier than with a barrier. Apparently, synchrony is what caused flow or social emotions in the classroom. The main conclusion is that synchrony leads to cognitive outcomes such as children’s academic performance in EFL learning.
  • ‘Daily Speaking’: Designing an App for Construction of Language Learning Model Supporting ‘Seamless Flipped’ Environment
    Authors: Zhou Hong, Gu Xiao-Qing, Lıu Hong-Jiao, Leng Jing, Keywords: Seamless learning, flipped classroom, seamless-flipped environment, language learning model. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3299699 Abstract: Seamless learning is becoming a research hotspot in recent years, and the emerging of micro-lectures, flipped classroom has strengthened the development of seamless learning. Based on the characteristics of the seamless learning across time and space and the course structure of the flipped classroom, and the theories of language learning, we put forward the language learning model which can support ‘seamless flipped’ environment (abbreviated as ‘S-F’). Meanwhile, the characteristics of the ‘S-F’ learning environment, the corresponding framework construction and the activity design of diversified corpora were introduced. Moreover, a language learning app named ‘Daily Speaking’ was developed to facilitate the practice of the language learning model in ‘S-F’ environment. In virtue of the learning case of Shanghai language, the rationality and feasibility of this framework were examined, expecting to provide a reference for the design of ‘S-F’ learning in different situations.
  • The Analysis of Deceptive and Truthful Speech: A Computational Linguistic Based Method
    Authors: Seham El Kareh, Miramar Etman, Keywords: Egyptian Arabic corpus, computational analysis, deceptive features, forensic linguistics, human perception, truthful features. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3299393 Abstract: Recently, detecting liars and extracting features which distinguish them from truth-tellers have been the focus of a wide range of disciplines. To the author’s best knowledge, most of the work has been done on facial expressions and body gestures but only few works have been done on the language used by both liars and truth-tellers. This paper sheds light on four axes. The first axis copes with building an audio corpus for deceptive and truthful speech for Egyptian Arabic speakers. The second axis focuses on examining the human perception of lies and proving our need for computational linguistic-based methods to extract features which characterize truthful and deceptive speech. The third axis is concerned with building a linguistic analysis program that could extract from the corpus the inter- and intra-linguistic cues for deceptive and truthful speech. The program built here is based on selected categories from the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count program. Our results demonstrated that Egyptian Arabic speakers on one hand preferred to use first-person pronouns and present tense compared to the past tense when lying and their lies lacked of second-person pronouns, and on the other hand, when telling the truth, they preferred to use the verbs related to motion and the nouns related to time. The results also showed that there is a need for bigger data to prove the significance of words related to emotions and numbers.
  • Semantic Preference across Research Articles: A Corpus-Based Study of Adjectives in English
    Authors: Valdênia Carvalho e Almeida, Keywords: Applied linguistics, corpus linguistics, chemistry, research article, semantic preference. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3298862 Abstract: The goal of the present study is to investigate the semantic preference of the most frequent adjectives in research articles through a corpus-based analysis of texts published in journals in Applied Linguistics (AL). The corpus used in this study contains texts published in the period from 2014 to 2018 in the three journals: Language Learning and Technology; English for Academic Purposes, and TESOL Quaterly, totaling more than one million words. A corpus-based analysis was carried out on the corpus to identify the most frequent adjectives that co-occurred in the three journals. By observing the concordance lines of the adjectives and analyzing the words they associated with, the semantic preferences of each adjective were determined. Later, the AL corpus analysis was compared to the investigation of the same adjectives in a corpus of Chemistry. This second part of the study aimed to identify possible differences and similarities between the two corpora in relation to the use of the adjectives in research articles from both areas. The results show that there are some preferences which seem to be closely related not only to the academic genre of the texts but also to the specific domain of the discipline and, to a lesser extent, to the context of research in each journal. This research illustrates a possible contribution of Corpus Linguistics to explore the concept of semantic preference in more detail, considering the complex nature of the phenomenon.
  • Analyzing Environmental Emotive Triggers in Terrorist Propaganda
    Authors: Travis Morris, Keywords: Emotive triggers, environmental security, natural language processing, propaganda analysis. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The purpose of this study is to measure the intersection of environmental security entities in terrorist propaganda. To the best of author’s knowledge, this is the first study of its kind to examine this intersection within terrorist propaganda. Rosoka, natural language processing software and frame analysis are used to advance our understanding of how environmental frames function as emotive triggers. Violent jihadi demagogues use frames to suggest violent and non-violent solutions to their grievances. Emotive triggers are framed in a way to leverage individual and collective attitudes in psychological warfare. A comparative research design is used because of the differences and similarities that exist between two variants of violent jihadi propaganda that target western audiences. Analysis is based on salience and network text analysis, which generates violent jihadi semantic networks. Findings indicate that environmental frames are used as emotive triggers across both data sets, but also as tactical and information data points. A significant finding is that certain core environmental emotive triggers like “water,” “soil,” and “trees” are significantly salient at the aggregate level across both data sets. All environmental entities can be classified into two categories, symbolic and literal. Importantly, this research illustrates how demagogues use environmental emotive triggers in cyber space from a subcultural perspective to mobilize target audiences to their ideology and praxis. Understanding the anatomy of propaganda construction is necessary in order to generate effective counter narratives in information operations. This research advances an additional method to inform practitioners and policy makers of how environmental security and propaganda intersect.