CORPUS LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE


Corpus Linguistics Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Corpus Linguistics is a conference track under the Humanities and Social Science Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Humanities and Social Science.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Humanities and Social Science).

Corpus Linguistics is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Corpus Linguistics Conference Track will be held at “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in March 2019” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Paris, France in June 2019” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in London, United Kingdom in August 2019” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in New York, United States in October 2019” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Rome, Italy in December 2019” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2020” - “Humanities and Social Science Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2020” .

Corpus Linguistics is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

Final Call

INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

JUNE 26 - 27, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 25, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 19HSSC06FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline July 22, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 19HSSC08GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 09 - 10, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 09, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 19HSSC10US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 11 - 12, 2019
ROME, ITALY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 12, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 19HSSC12IT
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 18 - 19, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline January 16, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20HSSC02GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline March 16, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20HSSC04ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

Humanities and Social Science Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Corpus Linguistics Conference"

  • Specialized Translation Teaching Strategies: A Corpus-Based Approach
    Authors: Yingying Ding, Keywords: Corpus-based approach, translation teaching, specialized translation. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1340502 Abstract: This study presents a methodology of specialized translation with the objective of helping teachers to improve the strategies in teaching translation. In order to allow students to acquire skills to translate specialized texts, they need to become familiar with the semantic and syntactic features of source texts and target texts. The aim of our study is to use a corpus-based approach in the teaching of specialized translation between Chinese and Italian. This study proposes to construct a specialized Chinese - Italian comparable corpus that consists of 50 economic contracts from the domain of food. With the help of AntConc, we propose to compile a comparable corpus in for translation teaching purposes. This paper attempts to provide insight into how teachers could benefit from comparable corpus in the teaching of specialized translation from Italian into Chinese and through some examples of passive sentences how students could learn to apply different strategies for translating appropriately the voice.
  • Corporate Cautionary Statement: A Genre of Professional Communication
    Authors: Chie Urawa, Keywords: Cautionary statements, corporate annual reports, corpus, risk factors. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1316207 Abstract: Cautionary statements or disclaimers in corporate annual reports need to be carefully designed because clear cautionary statements may protect a company in the case of legal disputes and may undermine positive impressions. This study compares the language of cautionary statements using two corpora, Sony’s cautionary statement corpus (S-corpus) and Panasonic’s cautionary statement corpus (P-corpus), illustrating the differences and similarities in relation to the use of meaningful cautionary statements and critically analyzing why practitioners use the way. The findings describe the distinct differences between the two companies in the presentation of the risk factors and the way how they make the statements. The word ability is used more for legal protection in S-corpus whereas the word possibility is used more to convey a better impression in P-corpus. The main similarities are identified in the use of lexical words and pronouns, and almost the same wordings for eight years. The findings show how they make the statements unique to the company in the presentation of risk factors, and the characteristics of specific genre of professional communication. Important implications of this study are that more comprehensive approach can be applied in other contexts, and be used by companies to reflect upon their cautionary statements.
  • Teaching Linguistic Humour Research Theories: Egyptian Higher Education EFL Literature Classes
    Authors: O. F. Elkommos, Keywords: ABTH, deviance, disjuncture, episodic, GTVH, humour competence, humour comprehension, humour in the classroom, humour in the literary texts, humour research linguistic theories, incongruity- resolution, isotopy-disjunction, jab line, longer text joke, narrative story line (macro-micro), punch line, six knowledge resource, SSTH, stacks, strands, teaching linguistics, teaching literature, TEFL, TESL. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1131101 Abstract: “Humour studies” is an interdisciplinary research area that is relatively recent. It interests researchers from the disciplines of psychology, sociology, medicine, nursing, in the work place, gender studies, among others, and certainly teaching, language learning, linguistics, and literature. Linguistic theories of humour research are numerous; some of which are of interest to the present study. In spite of the fact that humour courses are now taught in universities around the world in the Egyptian context it is not included. The purpose of the present study is two-fold: to review the state of arts and to show how linguistic theories of humour can be possibly used as an art and craft of teaching and of learning in EFL literature classes. In the present study linguistic theories of humour were applied to selected literary texts to interpret humour as an intrinsic artistic communicative competence challenge. Humour in the area of linguistics was seen as a fifth component of communicative competence of the second language leaner. In literature it was studied as satire, irony, wit, or comedy. Linguistic theories of humour now describe its linguistic structure, mechanism, function, and linguistic deviance. Semantic Script Theory of Verbal Humor (SSTH), General Theory of Verbal Humor (GTVH), Audience Based Theory of Humor (ABTH), and their extensions and subcategories as well as the pragmatic perspective were employed in the analyses. This research analysed the linguistic semantic structure of humour, its mechanism, and how the audience reader (teacher or learner) becomes an interactive interpreter of the humour. This promotes humour competence together with the linguistic, social, cultural, and discourse communicative competence. Studying humour as part of the literary texts and the perception of its function in the work also brings its positive association in class for educational purposes. Humour is by default a provoking/laughter-generated device. Incongruity recognition, perception and resolving it, is a cognitive mastery. This cognitive process involves a humour experience that lightens up the classroom and the mind. It establishes connections necessary for the learning process. In this context the study examined selected narratives to exemplify the application of the theories. It is, therefore, recommended that the theories would be taught and applied to literary texts for a better understanding of the language. Students will then develop their language competence. Teachers in EFL/ESL classes will teach the theories, assist students apply them and interpret text and in the process will also use humour. This is thus easing students' acquisition of the second language, making the classroom an enjoyable, cheerful, self-assuring, and self-illuminating experience for both themselves and their students. It is further recommended that courses of humour research studies should become an integral part of higher education curricula in Egypt.
  • Grammatically Coded Corpus of Spoken Lithuanian: Methodology and Development
    Authors: L. Kamandulytė-Merfeldienė, Keywords: CHILDES, Corpus of Spoken Lithuanian, grammatical annotation, grammatical disambiguation, lexicon, Lithuanian. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1129916 Abstract: The paper deals with the main issues of methodology of the Corpus of Spoken Lithuanian which was started to be developed in 2006. At present, the corpus consists of 300,000 grammatically annotated word forms. The creation of the corpus consists of three main stages: collecting the data, the transcription of the recorded data, and the grammatical annotation. Collecting the data was based on the principles of balance and naturality. The recorded speech was transcribed according to the CHAT requirements of CHILDES. The transcripts were double-checked and annotated grammatically using CHILDES. The development of the Corpus of Spoken Lithuanian has led to the constant increase in studies on spontaneous communication, and various papers have dealt with a distribution of parts of speech, use of different grammatical forms, variation of inflectional paradigms, distribution of fillers, syntactic functions of adjectives, the mean length of utterances.
  • Absence of Developmental Change in Epenthetic Vowel Duration in Japanese Speakers’ English
    Authors: Takayuki Konishi, Kakeru Yazawa, Mariko Kondo, Keywords: Vowel epenthesis, Japanese learners of English, L2 speech corpus, speech rhythm. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1129119 Abstract: This study examines developmental change in the production of epenthetic vowels by Japanese learners of English in relation to acquisition of L2 English speech rhythm. Seventy-two Japanese learners of English in the J-AESOP corpus were divided into lower- and higher-level learners according to their proficiency score and the frequency of vowel epenthesis. Three learners were excluded because no vowel epenthesis was observed in their utterances. The analysis of their read English speech data showed no statistical difference between lower- and higher-level learners, implying the absence of any developmental change in durations of epenthetic vowels. This result, together with the findings of previous studies, will be discussed in relation to the transfer of L1 phonology and manifestation of L2 English rhythm.
  • A Study on Bilingual Semantic Processing: Category Effects and Age Effects
    Authors: Lai Yi-Hsiu, Keywords: Bilingual semantic processing, aging, Mandarin Chinese, Southern Min. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1124431 Abstract: The present study addressed the nature of bilingual semantic processing in Mandarin Chinese and Southern Min and examined category effects and age effects. Nineteen bilingual adults of Mandarin Chinese and Southern Min, nine monolingual seniors of Mandarin Chinese, and ten monolingual seniors of Southern Min in Taiwan individually completed two semantic tasks: Picture naming and category fluency tasks. The instruments for the naming task were sixty black-and-white pictures, including thirty-five object pictures and twenty-five action pictures. The category fluency task also consisted of two semantic categories – objects (or nouns) and actions (or verbs). The reaction time for each picture/question was additionally calculated and analyzed. Oral productions in Mandarin Chinese and in Southern Min were compared and discussed to examine the category effects and age effects. The results of the category fluency task indicated that the content of information of these seniors was comparatively deteriorated, and thus they produced a smaller number of semantic-lexical items. Significant group differences were also found in the reaction time results. Category effects were significant for both adults and seniors in the semantic fluency task. The findings of the present study will help characterize the nature of the bilingual semantic processing of adults and seniors, and contribute to the fields of contrastive and corpus linguistics.
  • The Intonation of Romanian Greetings: A Sociolinguistics Approach
    Authors: Anca-Diana Bibiri, Mihaela Mocanu, Adrian Turculeț, Keywords: acoustic analysis, greetings, Romanian language, sociolinguistics DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1123715 Abstract: In a language the inventory of greetings is dynamic with frequent input and output, although this is hardly noticed by the speakers. In this register, there are a number of constant, conservative elements that survive different language models (among them, the classic formulae: bună ziua! (good afternoon!), bună seara! (good evening!), noapte bună! (good night!), la revedere! (goodbye!) and a number of items that fail to pass the test of time, according to language use at a time (ciao!, pa!, bai!). The source of innovation depends both of internal factors (contraction, conversion, combination of classic formulae of greetings), and of external ones (borrowings and calques). Their use imposes their frequencies at once, namely the elimination of the use of others. This paper presents a sociolinguistic approach of contemporary Romanian greetings, based on prosodic surveys in two research projects: AMPRom, and SoRoEs. Romanian language presents a rich inventory of questions (especially partial interrogatives questions/WH-Q) which are used as greetings, alone or, more commonly accompanying a proper greeting. The representative of the typical formulae is Ce mai faci? (How are you?), which, unlike its English counterpart How do you do?, has not become a stereotype, but retains an obvious emotional impact, while serving as a mark of sociolinguistic group. The analyzed corpus consists of structures containing greetings recorded in the main Romanian cultural (urban) centers. From the methodological point of view, the acoustic analysis of the recorded data is performed using software tools (GoldWave, Praat), identifying intonation patterns related to three sociolinguistics variables: age, sex and level of education. The intonation patterns of the analyzed statements are at the interface between partial questions and typical greetings.
  • Redundancy in Malay Morphology: School Grammar versus Corpus Grammar
    Authors: Zaharani Ahmad, Nor Hashimah Jalaluddin, Keywords: Corpus grammar, morphology, redundancy, school grammar. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1339069 Abstract: The aim of this paper is to examine and identify the issue of linguistic redundancy in two competing grammars of Malay, namely the school grammar and the corpus grammar. The former is a normative grammar which is formally and prescriptively taught in the classroom, whereas the latter is a descriptive grammar that is informally acquired and mastered by the students as native speakers of the language outside the classroom. Corpus grammar is depicted based on its actual used in natural occurring texts, as attested in the corpus. It is observed that the grammar taught in schools is incompatible with the grammar used in the corpus. For instance, a noun phrase containing nominal reduplicated form which denotes plurality (i.e. murid-murid ‘students’ which is derived from murid ‘student’) and a modifier categorized as quantifiers (i.e. semua ‘all’, seluruh ‘entire’, and kebanyakan ‘most’) is not acceptable in the school grammar because the formation (i.e. semua murid-murid ‘all the students’ kebanyakan pelajar-pelajar ‘most of the students’) is claimed to be redundant, and redundancy is prohibited in the grammar. Redundancy is generally construed as the property of speech and language by which more information is provided than is precisely required for the message to be understood, so that, if some information is omitted, the remaining information will still be sufficient for the message to be comprehended. Thus, the correct construction to be used is strictly the reduplicated form (i.e. murid-murid ‘students’) or the quantifier plus the root (i.e. semua murid ‘all the students’) with the intention that the grammatical meaning of plural is not repeated. Nevertheless, the so-called redundant form (i.e. kebanyakan pelajar-pelajar ‘most of the students’) is frequently used in the corpus grammar. This study shows that there are a number of redundant forms occur in the morphology of the language, particularly in affixation, reduplication and combination of both. Apparently, the so-called redundancy has grammatical and socio-cultural functions in communication that is to give emphasis and to stress the importance of the information delivered by the speakers or writers.
  • Crossing Borders: In Research and Business Communication
    Authors: E. Podhovnik, Keywords: Language in international business, sociolinguistics, ethnopragmatics, cultural scripts. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1099944 Abstract: Cultures play a role in business communication and in research. At the example of language in international business, this paper addresses the issue of how the research cultures of management research and linguistics as well as cultures as such can be linked. After looking at existing research on language in international business, this paper approaches communication in international business from a linguistic angle and attempts to explain communication issues in businesses based on linguistic research. Thus the paper makes a step into cross-disciplinary research combining management research with linguistics.
  • The Image as an Initial Element of the Cognitive Understanding of Words
    Authors: S. Pesina, T. Solonchak, Keywords: Image, metaphor, concept, creation of a metaphor, cognitive linguistics, erased image, vivid image. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1093424 Abstract: An analysis of word semantics focusing on the invariance of advanced imagery in several pressing problems. Interest in the language of imagery is caused by the introduction, in the linguistics sphere, of a new paradigm, the center of which is the personality of the speaker (the subject of the language). Particularly noteworthy is the question of the place of the image when discussing the lexical, phraseological values ​​and the relationship of imagery and metaphors. In part, the formation of a metaphor, as an interaction between two intellective entities, occurs at a cognitive level, and it is the category of the image, having cognitive roots, which aides in the correct interpretation of the results of this process on the lexical-semantic level.