IDENTITY CONFERENCE


Identity Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Identity is a conference track under the Psychology Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Psychology.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Psychology).

Identity is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Identity Conference Track will be held at “Psychology Conference in Paris, France in July 2021” - “Psychology Conference in New York, United States in August 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2021” - “Psychology Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Paris, France in December 2021” .

Identity is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

XXIV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

XXV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2021
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

XXVI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2021
TOKYO, JAPAN

XXVII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2021
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

XXVIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

XXIX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

XXX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

XXXI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2021
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

XXXII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2021
BANGKOK, THAILAND

XXXIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

II. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JUNE 26 - 27, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

V. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

FINISHED

VI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

VII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

VIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

IX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

X. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

XI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

FINISHED

XIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

FINISHED

XIV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

XV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XVI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

XVII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

FINISHED

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

FINISHED

XIX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

XX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

XXI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

XXII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

XXIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

Psychology Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Identity Conference"

  • Injunctions, Disjunctions, Remnants: The Reverse of Unity
    Authors: Igor Guatelli, Keywords: Clearing, interstice, negative, remnant, spectrum. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The universe of aesthetic perception entails impasses about sensitive divergences that each text or visual object may be subjected to. If approached through intertextuality that is not based on the misleading notion of kinships or similarities a priori admissible, the possibility of anachronistic, heterogeneous - and non-diachronic - assemblies can enhance the emergence of interval movements, intermediate, and conflicting, conducive to a method of reading, interpreting, and assigning meaning that escapes the rigid antinomies of the mere being and non-being of things. In negative, they operate in a relationship built by the lack of an adjusted meaning set by their positive existences, with no remainders; the generated interval becomes the remnant of each of them; it is the opening that obscures the stable positions of each one. Without the negative of absence, of that which is always missing or must be missing in a text, concept, or image made positive by history, nothing is perceived beyond what has been already given. Pairings or binary oppositions cannot lead only to functional syntheses; on the contrary, methodological disturbances accumulated by the approximation of signs and entities can initiate a process of becoming as an opening to an unforeseen other, transformation until a moment when the difficulties of [re]conciliation become the mainstay of a future of that sign/entity, not envisioned a priori. A counter-history can emerge from these unprecedented, misadjusted approaches, beginnings of unassigned injunctions and disjunctions, in short, difficult alliances that open cracks in a supposedly cohesive history, chained in its apparent linearity with no remains, understood as a categorical historical imperative. Interstices are minority fields that, because of their opening, are capable of causing opacity in that which, apparently, presents itself with irreducible clarity. Resulting from an incomplete and maladjusted [at the least dual] marriage between the signs/entities that originate them, this interval may destabilize and cause disorder in these entities and their own meanings. The interstitials offer a hyphenated relationship: a simultaneous union and separation, a spacing between the entity’s identity and its otherness or, alterity. One and the other may no longer be seen without the crack or fissure that now separates them, uniting, by a space-time lapse. Ontological, semantic shifts are caused by this fissure, an absence between one and the other, one with and against the other. Based on an improbable approximation between some conceptual and semantic shifts within the design production of architect Rem Koolhaas and the textual production of the philosopher Jacques Derrida, this article questions the notion of unity, coherence, affinity, and complementarity in the process of construction of thought from these ontological, epistemological, and semiological fissures that rattle the signs/entities and their stable meanings. Fissures in a thought that is considered coherent, cohesive, formatted are the negativity that constitutes the interstices that allow us to move towards what still remains as non-identity, which allows us to begin another story.
  • District 10 in Tehran: Urban Transformation and the Survey Evidence of Loss in Place Attachment in High Rises
    Authors: Roya Morad, W. Eirik Heintz, Keywords: High density, place attachment, social communication, street life, urban transformation. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The identity of a neighborhood is inevitably shaped by the architecture and the people of that place. Conventionally the streets within each neighborhood served as a semi-public-private extension of the private living spaces. The street as a design element formed a hybrid condition that was neither totally public nor private, and it encouraged social interactions. Thus through creating a sense of community, one of the most basic human needs of belonging was achieved. Similar to major global cities, Tehran has undergone serious urbanization. Developing into a capital city of high rises has resulted in an increase in urban density. Although allocating more residential units in each neighborhood was a critical response to the population boom and the limited land area of the city, it also created a crisis in terms of social communication and place attachment. District 10 in Tehran is a neighborhood that has undergone the most urban transformation among the other 22 districts in the capital and currently has the highest population density. This paper will explore how the active streets in district 10 have changed into their current condition of high rises with a lack of meaningful social interactions amongst its inhabitants. A residential building can be thought of as a large group of people. One would think that as the number of people increases, the opportunities for social communications would increase as well. However, according to the survey, there is an indirect relationship between the two. As the number of people of a residential building increases, the quality of each acquaintance reduces, and the depth of relationships between people tends to decrease. This comes from the anonymity of being part of a crowd and the lack of social spaces characterized by most high-rise apartment buildings. Without a sense of community, the attachment to a neighborhood is decreased. This paper further explores how the neighborhood participates to fulfill ones need for social interaction and focuses on the qualitative aspects of alternative spaces that can redevelop the sense of place attachment within the community.
  • The Relationship between the Feeling of Distributive Justice and National Identity of the Youth
    Authors: Leila Batmany, Keywords: Distributive justice, national identity, legitimacy of political system, Cochran formula, multistage cluster sampling. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: This research studies the relationship between the feeling of distributive justice and national identity of the youth. The present analysis intends to experimentally investigate the various dimensions of the justice feeling and its effect on the national identity components. The study has taken justice into consideration from four different points of view on the basis of availability of valuable social sources such as power, wealth, knowledge and status in the political, economic, and cultural and status justice respectively. Furthermore, the national identity has been considered as the feeling of honour, attachment and commitment towards national society and its seven components i.e. history, language, culture, political system, religion, geographical territory and society. The 'field study' has been used as the method for the research with the individual as unit, taking 368 young between the age of 18 and 29 living in Tehran, chosen randomly according to Cochran formula. The individual samples have been randomly chosen among five districts in north, south, west, east, and centre of Tehran, based on the multistage cluster sampling. The data collection has been performed with the use of questionnaire and interview. The most important results are as follows: i) The feeling of economic justice is the weakest one among the youth. ii) The strongest and the weakest dimensions of the national identity are, respectively, the historical and the social dimension. iii) There is a positive and meaningful relationship between the feeling political and statues justice and then national identity, whereas no meaningful relationship exists between the economic and cultural justice and the national identity. iv) There is a positive and meaningful relationship between the feeling of justice in all dimensions and legitimacy of the political system. There is also such a relationship between the legitimacy of the political system and national identity. v) Generally, there is a positive and meaningful relationship between the feeling of distributive justice and national identity among the youth. vi) It is through the legitimacy of the political system that justice feeling can have an influence on the national identity.
  • The Influence of Interest, Beliefs, and Identity with Mathematics on Achievement
    Authors: Asma Alzahrani, Elizabeth Stojanovski, Keywords: Mathematics achievement, math efficacy, mathematics interest, identity. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: This study investigated factors that influence mathematics achievement based on a sample of ninth-grade students (N  =  21,444) from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS09). Key aspects studied included efficacy in mathematics, interest and enjoyment of mathematics, identity with mathematics and future utility beliefs and how these influence mathematics achievement. The predictability of mathematics achievement based on these factors was assessed using correlation coefficients and multiple linear regression. Spearman rank correlations and multiple regression analyses indicated positive and statistically significant relationships between the explanatory variables: mathematics efficacy, identity with mathematics, interest in and future utility beliefs with the response variable, achievement in mathematics.
  • Harrison’s Stolen: Addressing Aboriginal and Indigenous Islanders Human Rights
    Authors: M. Shukry, Keywords: Aboriginal, audience, Australia, children, culture, drama, home, human rights, identity, indigenous, Jane Harrison, memory, scenic effects, setting, stage, stage directions, Stolen, trauma. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3461976 Abstract: According to the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, every human being is entitled to rights in life that should be respected by others and protected by the state and community. Such rights are inherent regardless of colour, ethnicity, gender, religion or otherwise, and it is expected that all humans alike have the right to live without discrimination of any sort. However, that has not been the case with Aborigines in Australia. Over a long period of time, the governments of the State and the Territories and the Australian Commonwealth denied the Aboriginal and Indigenous inhabitants of the Torres Strait Islands such rights. Past Australian governments set policies and laws that enabled them to forcefully remove Indigenous children from their parents, which resulted in creating lost generations living the trauma of the loss of cultural identity, alienation and even their own selfhood. Intending to reduce that population of natives and their Aboriginal culture while, on the other hand, assimilate them into mainstream society, they gave themselves the right to remove them from their families with no hope of return. That practice has led to tragic consequences due to the trauma that has affected those children, an experience that is depicted by Jane Harrison in her play Stolen. The drama is the outcome of a six-year project on lost children and which was first performed in 1997 in Melbourne. Five actors only appear on the stage, playing the role of all the different characters, whether the main protagonists or the remaining cast, present or non-present ones as voices. The play outlines the life of five children who have been taken from their parents at an early age, entailing a disastrous negative impact that differs from one to the other. Unknown to each other, what connects between them is being put in a children’s home. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the play’s text in light of the 1948 Declaration of Human Rights, using it as a lens that reflects the atrocities practiced against the Aborigines. It highlights how such practices formed an outrageous violation of those natives’ rights as human beings. Harrison’s dramatic technique in conveying the children’s experiences is through a non-linear structure, fluctuating between past and present that are linked together within each of the five characters, reflecting their suffering and pain to create an emotional link between them and the audience. Her dramatic handling of the issue by fusing tragedy with humour as well as symbolism is a successful technique in revealing the traumatic memory of those children and their present life. The play has made a difference in commencing to address the problem of the right of all children to be with their families, which renders the real meaning of having a home and an identity as people.
  • An Interview and PhotoVoice Exploration of Sexual Education Provision to Women with Physical Disability and Potential Experiences of Violence
    Authors: D. Beckwith, Keywords: Lived-experience, PhotoVoice, sexuality, violence. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: This research explored sexual identity for women with physical disability, both congenital and acquired. It also explored whether exposure to violence or negative risk-taking had played a role in their intimate relationships. This phenomenological research used semi-structured interviews and photo elicitation with the researcher’s insider knowledge adding experiential substance and understanding to the discussion. Findings confirm sexuality for women with physical disability is marginalised and de-gendered making it less of a priority for professionals and policy makers and emphasising the need to more effectively support women with disability in relation to their sexuality, sexual expression and violence.
  • The Tourist Satisfaction on Brand Identity Design of Creative Agriculture Community Enterprise, Bang Khonthi District, Samut Songkhram Province
    Authors: Panupong Chanplin, Kathaleeya Chanda., Wilailuk Mepracha, Keywords: Satisfaction, brand identity, logo, creative agriculture community enterprise. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3299341 Abstract: The aims of this research were twofold: 1) to brand identity design of Creative Agriculture Community Enterprise, Bang Khonthi District, Samut Songkhram Province and 2) to study the level of tourist satisfaction towards brand identity design of Creative Agriculture Community Enterprise, Bang Khonthi District, Samut Songkhram Province. tourist satisfaction was measured using six criteria: clear brand positioning, likeable brand personality, memorable logo, attractive color palette, professional typography and on-brand supporting graphics. The researcher utilized a probability sampling method via simple random sampling. The sample consisted of 30 tourists in the Creative Agriculture Community Enterprise. Statistics utilized for data analysis were percentage, mean, and standard deviation. The results suggest that tourist had high levels of satisfaction towards all six criteria of the brand identity design that was designed to target them. This study proposes that specifically brand identity designed of Creative Agriculture Community Enterprise could also be implemented with other real media already available on the market.
  • Identifying the Traditional Color Scheme in Decorative Patterns Used by the Bahnar Ethnic Group in the Central Highlands of Vietnam
    Authors: Nguyen Viet Tan, Keywords: Bahnar ethic group, decorative patterns, the central highland of Vietnam, traditional color scheme. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3298839 Abstract: The Bahnar is one of 11 indigenous groups living in the Central Highlands of Vietnam. It is one among the four most popular groups in this area, including the Mnong who speak the same language of Mon Khmer family, while both groups of the Jrai and the Rhade belong to the Malayo-Polynesian language family. These groups once captured fertile plateaus, left their cultural and artistic heritage which affected the remaining small groups. Despite the difference in ethnic origins, these groups seem to share similar beliefs, customs and related folk arts after a very long time living beside each other. However, through an in-depth study, this paper points out the fact that the decorative patterns used by the Bahnar are different from the other ethnic groups, especially in color. Based on historical materials from the local museums and some studies in 1980s when all of the ethnic groups in this area had still lived in self-sufficient condition, this paper characterizes the traditional color scheme used by the Bahnar and identifies the difference in decorative motifs of this group compared to the others by pointing out they do not use green in their usual decorative patterns. Moreover, combined with some field surveys recently, through comparative analysis, it also discovers stylistic variations of these patterns in the process of cultural exchange with the other ethnic groups, both in and out of the region, in modern living conditions. This study helps to preserve and promote the traditional values and cultural identity of the Bahnar people in the Central Highlands of Vietnam, avoiding the fusion of styles among groups during the cultural exchange.
  • Manipulation of Ideological Items in the Audiovisual Translation of Voiced-Over Documentaries in the Arab World
    Authors: S. Chabbak, Keywords: Audiovisual translation, ideological items, manipulation, voiced-over documentaries. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3298649 Abstract: In a widely globalized world, the influence of audiovisual translation on the culture and identity of audiences is unmistakable. However, in the Arab World, there is a noticeable disproportion between this growing influence and the research carried out in the field. As a matter of fact, the voiced-over documentary is one of the most abundantly translated genres in the Arab World that carries lots of ideological elements which are in many cases rendered by manipulation. However, voiced-over documentaries have hardly received any focused attention from researchers in the Arab World. This paper attempts to scrutinize the process of translation of voiced-over documentaries in the Arab World, from French into Arabic in the present case study, by sub-categorizing the ideological items subject to manipulation, identifying the techniques utilized in their translation and exploring the potential extra-linguistic factors that prompt translation agents to opt for manipulative translation. The investigation is based on a corpus of 94 episodes taken from a series entitled 360° GEO Reports, produced by the French German network ARTE in French, and acquired, translated and aired by Al Jazeera Documentary Channel for Arab audiences. The results yielded 124 cases of manipulation in four sub-categories of ideological items, and the use of 10 different oblique procedures in the process of manipulative translation. The study also revealed that manipulation is in most of the instances dictated by the editorial line of the broadcasting channel, in addition to the religious, geopolitical and socio-cultural peculiarities of the target culture.
  • An Analysis of Language Borrowing among Algerian University Students Using Online Facebook Conversations
    Authors: Messaouda Annab, Keywords: Borrowing, language performance, linguistic background, social media. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2643854 Abstract: The rapid development of technology has led to an important context in which different languages and structures are used in the same conversations. This paper investigates the practice of language borrowing within social media platform, namely, Facebook among Algerian Vernacular Arabic (AVA) students. In other words, this study will explore how Algerian students have incorporated lexical English borrowing in their online conversations. This paper will examine the relationships between language, culture and identity among a multilingual group. The main objective is to determine the cultural and linguistic functions that borrowing fulfills in social media and to explain the possible factors underlying English borrowing. The nature of the study entails the use of an online research method that includes ten online Facebook conversations in the form of private messages collected from Bachelor and Masters Algerian students recruited from the English department at the University of Oum El-Bouaghi. The analysis of data revealed that social media platform provided the users with opportunities to shift from one language to another. This practice was noticed in students’ online conversations. English borrowing was the most relevant language performance in accordance with Arabic which is the mother tongue of the chosen sample. The analysis has assumed that participants are skilled in more than one language.