COGNITION AND LEARNING CONFERENCE


Cognition and Learning Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Cognition and Learning is a conference track under the Psychology Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Psychology.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Psychology).

Cognition and Learning is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Cognition and Learning Conference Track will be held at “Psychology Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Paris, France in December 2021” .

Cognition and Learning is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

XXIX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

XXX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

XXXI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2021
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

XXXII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2021
BANGKOK, THAILAND

XXXIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

II. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JUNE 26 - 27, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

V. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

FINISHED

VI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

VII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

VIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

IX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

X. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

XI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

FINISHED

XIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

FINISHED

XIV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

XV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XVI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

XVII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

FINISHED

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

FINISHED

XIX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

XX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

XXI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

XXII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

XXIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XXIV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

XXV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2021
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XXVI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2021
TOKYO, JAPAN

FINISHED

XXVII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2021
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

FINISHED

XXVIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

Psychology Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Cognition and Learning Conference"

  • Migrant Women English Instructors’ Transformative Workplace Learning Experiences in Post-Secondary English Language Programs in Ontario, Canada
    Authors: Justine Jun, Keywords: English teacher education, professional learning, transformative learning theory, workplace learning. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: This study aims to reveal migrant women English instructors' workplace learning experiences in Canadian post-secondary institutions in Ontario. Migrant women English instructors in higher education are an understudied group of teachers. This study employs a qualitative research paradigm. Mezirow’s Transformative Learning Theory is an essential lens for the researcher to explain, analyze, and interpret the research data. It is a collaborative research project. The researcher and participants cooperatively create photographic or other artwork data responding to the research questions. Photovoice and arts-informed data collection methodology are the main methods. Research participants engage in the study as co-researchers and inquire about their own workplace learning experiences, actively utilizing their critical self-reflective and dialogic skills. Co-researchers individually select the forms of artwork they prefer to engage with to represent their transformative workplace learning experiences about the Canadian workplace cultures that they underwent while working with colleagues and administrators in the workplace. Once the co-researchers generate their cultural artifacts as research data, they collaboratively interpret their artworks with the researcher and other volunteer co-researchers. Co-researchers jointly investigate the themes emerging from the artworks. They also interpret the meanings of their own and others’ workplace learning experiences embedded in the artworks through interactive one-on-one or group interviews. The following are the research questions that the migrant women English instructor participants examine and answer: (1) What have they learned about their workplace culture and how do they explain their learning experiences? (2) How transformative have their learning experiences been at work? (3) How have their colleagues and administrators influenced their transformative learning? (4) What kind of support have they received? What supports have been valuable to them and what changes would they like to see? (5) What have their learning experiences transformed? (6) What has this arts-informed research process transformed? The study findings implicate English language instructor support currently practiced in post-secondary English language programs in Ontario, Canada, especially for migrant women English instructors. This research is a doctoral empirical study in progress. This study has the urgency to address the research problem that few studies have investigated migrant English instructors’ professional learning and support issues in the workplace, precisely that of English instructors working with adult learners in Canada. While appropriate social and professional support for migrant English instructors is required throughout the country, the present workplace realities in Ontario's English language programs need to be heard soon. For that purpose, the conceptualization of this study is crucial. It makes the investigation of under-represented instructors’ under-researched social phenomena, workplace learning and support, viable and rigorous. This paper demonstrates the robust theorization of English instructors’ workplace experiences using Mezirow’s Transformative Learning Theory in the English language teacher education field. 
  • Learning Objects Content Presentation Adaptation Model Considering Students' Learning Styles
    Authors: Zenaide Carvalho da Silva, Andrey Ricardo Pimentel, Leandro Rodrigues Ferreira, Keywords: Adaptation, interface, learning styles, learning objects, students. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Learning styles (LSs) correspond to the individual preferences of a person regarding the modes and forms in which he/she prefers to learn throughout the teaching/learning process. The content presentation of learning objects (LOs) using knowledge about the students’ LSs offers them digital educational resources tailored to their individual learning preferences. In this context, the most relevant characteristics of the LSs along with the most appropriate forms of LOs' content presentation were mapped and associated. Such was performed in order to define the composition of an adaptive model of LO's content presentation considering the LSs, which was called Adaptation of Content Presentation of Learning Objects Considering Learning Styles (ACPLOLS). LO prototypes were created with interfaces that were adapted to students' LSs. These prototypes were based on a model created for validation of the approaches that were used, which were established through experiments with the students. The results of subjective measures of students' emotional responses demonstrated that the ACPLOLS has reached the desired results in relation to the adequacy of the LOs interface, in accordance with the Felder-Silverman LSs Model.
  • An Investigation into Libyan Teachers’ Views of Children’s Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties
    Authors: Abdelbasit Gadour, Keywords: Teachers, children, learning, emotional and behaviour difficulties. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: A great number of children in mainstream schools across Libya is currently living with emotional, behavioural difficulties. This study aims to explore teachers’ perceptions of children’s emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) and their attributions of the causes of EBD. The relevance of this area of study to current educational practice is illustrated in the fact that primary school teachers in Libya find classroom behaviour problems one of the major difficulties they face. The information presented in this study was gathered from 182 teachers that responded back to the survey, of whom, 27 teachers were later interviewed. In general, teachers’ perceptions of EBD reflect personal experience, training, and attitudes. Teachers appear from this study to use words such as indifferent, frightened, withdrawn, aggressive, disobedient, hyperactive, less ambitious, lacking concentration, and academically weak to describe pupils with EBD. The implications of this study are envisaged as being extremely important to support teachers addressing children’s EBD and shed light on the contributing factors to EBD for a successful teaching-learning process in Libyan primary schools.
  • Designing for Inclusion within the Learning Management System: Social Justice, Identities, and Online Design for Digital Spaces in Higher Education
    Authors: Christina Van Wingerden, Keywords: Belonging, critical pedagogy, instructional design, Learning Management System, LMS. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The aim of this paper is to propose pedagogical design for learning management systems (LMS) that offers greater inclusion for students based on a number of theoretical perspectives and delineated through an example. Considering the impact of COVID-19, including on student mental health, the research suggesting the importance of student sense of belonging on retention, success, and student well-being, the author describes intentional LMS design incorporating theoretically based practices informed by critical theory, feminist theory, indigenous theory and practices, and new materiality. This article considers important aspects of these theories and practices which attend to inclusion, identities, and socially just learning environments. Additionally, increasing student sense of belonging and mental health through LMS design influenced by adult learning theory and the community of inquiry model are described.  The process of thinking through LMS pedagogical design with inclusion intentionally in mind affords the opportunity to allow LMS to go beyond course use as a repository of documents, to an intentional community of practice that facilitates belonging and connection, something much needed in our times. In virtual learning environments it has been harder to discern how students are doing, especially in feeling connected to their courses, their faculty, and their student peers. Increasingly at the forefront of public universities is addressing the needs of students with multiple and intersecting identities and the multiplicity of needs and accommodations. Education in 2020, and moving forward, calls for embedding critical theories and inclusive ideals and pedagogies to the ways instructors design and teach in online platforms. Through utilization of critical theoretical frameworks and instructional practices, students may experience the LMS as a welcoming place with intentional plans for welcoming diversity in identities.
  • The Influence of Job Recognition and Job Motivation on Organizational Commitment in Public Sector: The Mediation Role of Employee Engagement
    Authors: Muhammad Tayyab, Saba Saira, Keywords: Job motivation, job recognition, employee engagement, employee commitment, public sector, land record officers. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: It is an established fact that organizations across the globe consider employees as their assets and try to advance their well-being. However, the local firms of developing countries are mostly profit oriented and do not have much concern about their employees’ engagement or commitment. Like other developing countries, the local organizations of Pakistan are also less concerned about the well-being of their employees. Especially public sector organizations lack concern regarding engagement, satisfaction or commitment of the employees. Therefore, this study aimed at investigating the impact of job recognition and job motivation on organizational commitment in the mediation role of employee engagement. The data were collected from land record officers of board of revenue, Punjab, Pakistan. Structured questionnaire was used to collect data through physically visiting land record officers and also through the internet. A total of 318 land record officers’ responses were finalized to perform data analysis. The data were analyzed through confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling technique. The findings revealed that job recognition and job motivation have direct as well as indirect positive and significant impact on organizational commitment. The limitations, practical implications and future research indications are also explained.
  • Machine Learning Based Approach for Measuring Promotion Effectiveness in Multiple Parallel Promotions’ Scenarios
    Authors: Revoti Prasad Bora, Nikita Katyal, Keywords: Halo, cannibalization, promotion, baseline, temporary price reduction, retail, elasticity, cross price elasticity, machine learning, random forest, linear regression. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Promotion is a key element in the retail business. Thus, analysis of promotions to quantify their effectiveness in terms of Revenue and/or Margin is an essential activity in the retail industry. However, measuring the sales/revenue uplift is based on estimations, as the actual sales/revenue without the promotion is not present. Further, the presence of Halo and Cannibalization in a multiple parallel promotions’ scenario complicates the problem. Calculating Baseline by considering inter-brand/competitor items or using Halo and Cannibalization's impact on Revenue calculations by considering Baseline as an interpretation of items’ unit sales in neighboring nonpromotional weeks individually may not capture the overall Revenue uplift in the case of multiple parallel promotions. Hence, this paper proposes a Machine Learning based method for calculating the Revenue uplift by considering the Halo and Cannibalization impact on the Baseline and the Revenue. In the first section of the proposed methodology, Baseline of an item is calculated by incorporating the impact of the promotions on its related items. In the later section, the Revenue of an item is calculated by considering both Halo and Cannibalization impacts. Hence, this methodology enables correct calculation of the overall Revenue uplift due a given promotion.
  • Reimagining the Learning Management System as a “Third” Space
    Authors: Christina Van Wingerden, Keywords: COVID-19, learning management systems, sense of belonging, third space. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: This paper focuses on a sense of belonging, isolation, and the use of a learning management system as a “third space” for connection and community. Given student use of learning management systems (LMS) for courses on campuses, moderate to high use of social media and hand-held devices, the author explores the possibilities of LMS as a third space. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated student experiences of isolation, and research indicates that students who experience a sense of belonging have a greater likelihood for academic retention and success. The impacts on students of an LMS designed for student employee orientation and training were examined through a mixed methods approach, including a survey, individual interviews, and focus groups. The sample involved 250-450 undergraduate student employees at a US northwestern university. The goal of the study was to find out the efficiency and effectiveness of the orientation information for a wide range of student employees from multiple student affairs departments. And unexpected finding emerged within the study in 2015 and was noted again as a finding in the 2017 study. Students reported feeling like they individually connected to the department, and further to the university because of the LMS orientation. They stated they could see themselves as part of the university community and like they belonged. The orientation, through the LMS, was designed for and occurred online (asynchronous), prior to students traveling and beginning university life for the academic year. The students indicated connection and belonging resulting from some of the design features. With the onset of COVID-19 and prolonged sheltering in place in North America, as well as other parts of the world, students have been precluded from physically gathering to educate and learn. COVID-19 essentially paused face-to-face education in 2020. Media, governments, and higher education outlets have been reporting on widespread college student stress, isolation, loneliness, and sadness. In this context, the author conducted a current mixed methods study (online survey, online interviews) of students in advanced degree programs, like Ph.D. and Ed.D. specifically investigating isolation and sense of belonging. As a part of the study a prototype of a Canvas site was experienced by student interviewees for their reaction of this Canvas site prototype as a “third” space. Some preliminary findings of this study are presented. Doctoral students in the study affirmed the potential of LMS as a third space for community and social academic connection.
  • Awakeness, Awareness and Learning Mathematics for Arab Students: A Pilot Study
    Authors: S. Rawashdi, D. Bshouty, Keywords: Awakeness, awareness, learning mathematics, pupils. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: This paper aimed at discussing how to urge middle and high school Arab students in Israel to be aware of the importance of and investing in learning mathematics. In the first phase of the study, three questionnaires were passed to two nine-grade classes, one on Awareness, one on Awakeness and one on Learning. One of the two classes was an outstanding class from a public school (PUBS) of 31 students, and the other a heterogeneous class from a private school (PRIS) with 31 students. The Learning questionnaire which was administrated to the Awareness and Awareness topics was passed to PRIS and the Awareness and Awareness Questionnaires were passed to the PUBS class After two months we passed the post-questionnaire to both classes to validate the long-term impact of the study. The findings of the study show that awakeness and awareness processes have an effect on the math learning process, on its context in students' daily lives and their growing interest in learning math.
  • Podcasting as an Instructional Method: Case Study of a School Psychology Class
    Authors: Jeff A. Tysinger, Dawn P. Tysinger, Keywords: Motivation, online learning, pedagogy, podcast. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: There has been considerable growth in online learning. Researchers continue to explore the impact various methods of delivery. Podcasting is a popular method for sharing information. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of student motivation and the perception of the acquisition of knowledge in an online environment of a skill-based class. 25 students in a school psychology graduate class completed a pretest and posttest examining podcast use and familiarity. In addition, at the completion of the course they were administered a modified version of the Instructional Materials Motivation Survey. The four subscales were examined (attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction). Results indicated that students are motivated, they perceive podcasts as positive instructional tools, and students are successful in acquiring the needed information. Additional benefits of using podcasts and recommendations in school psychology training are discussed.
  • The Effectiveness of Lesson Study via Learning Communities in Increasing Instructional Self-Efficacy of Beginning Special Educators
    Authors: David D. Hampton, Keywords: Lesson study, learning community, lesson study self-efficacy, new faculty. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Lesson study is used as an instructional technique to promote both student and faculty learning. However, little is known about the usefulness of learning communities in supporting results of lesson study on the self-efficacy and development for tenure-track faculty. This study investigated the impact of participation in a lesson study learning community on 34 new faculty members at a mid-size Midwestern University, specifically regarding implementing lesson study evaluations by new faculty on their reported self-efficacy. Results indicate that participation in a lesson study learning community significantly increased faculty members’ lesson study self-efficacy as well as grant and manuscript production over one academic year. Suggestions for future lesson study around faculty learning communities are discussed.