BEHAVIORAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE


Behavioral Psychology Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Behavioral Psychology is a conference track under the Psychology Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Psychology.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Psychology).

Behavioral Psychology is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Behavioral Psychology Conference Track will be held at “Psychology Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in March 2019” - “Psychology Conference in Paris, France in June 2019” - “Psychology Conference in London, United Kingdom in August 2019” - “Psychology Conference in New York, United States in October 2019” - “Psychology Conference in Rome, Italy in December 2019” - “Psychology Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2020” - “Psychology Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2020” .

Behavioral Psychology is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

Final Call

INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JUNE 26 - 27, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 25, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 19PC06FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline July 22, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 19PC08GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 09 - 10, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 09, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 19PC10US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 11 - 12, 2019
ROME, ITALY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 12, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 19PC12IT
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 18 - 19, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline January 16, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20PC02GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline March 16, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20PC04ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

Psychology Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Behavioral Psychology Conference"

  • The Effect of Socio-Affective Variables in the Relationship between Organizational Trust and Employee Turnover Intention
    Authors: Paula A. Cruise, Carvell McLeary, Keywords: Context-specific organizational trust, cross-cultural psychology, theory of planned behavior, employee turnover intention. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1317276 Abstract: Employee turnover leads to lowered productivity, decreased morale and work quality, and psychological effects associated with employee separation and replacement. Yet, it remains unknown why talented employees willingly withdraw from organizations. This uncertainty is worsened as studies; a) priorities organizational over individual predictors resulting in restriction in range in turnover measurement; b) focus on actual rather than intended turnover thereby limiting conceptual understanding of the turnover construct and its relationship with other variables and; c) produce inconsistent findings across cultures, contexts and industries despite a clear need for a unified perspective. The current study addressed these gaps by adopting the theory of planned behavior (TPB) framework to examine socio-cognitive factors in organizational trust and individual turnover intentions among bankers and energy employees in Jamaica. In a comparative study of n=369 [nbank= 264; male=57 (22.73%); nenergy =105; male =45 (42.86)], it was hypothesized that organizational trust was a predictor of employee turnover intention, and the effect of individual, group, cognitive and socio-affective variables varied across industry. Findings from structural equation modelling confirmed the hypothesis, with a model of both cognitive and socio-affective variables being a better fit [CMIN (χ2) = 800.067, df = 364, p ≤ .000; CFI = 0.950; RMSEA = 0.057 with 90% C.I. (0.052 - 0.062); PCLOSE = 0.016; PNFI = 0.818 in predicting turnover intention. The findings are discussed in relation to socio-cognitive components of trust models and predicting negative employee behaviors across cultures and industries.
  • Assessment-Assisted and Relationship-Based Financial Advising: Using an Empirical Assessment to Understand Personal Investor Risk Tolerance in Professional Advising Relationships
    Authors: Jerry Szatko, Edan L. Jorgensen, Stacia Jorgensen, Keywords: Behavior based advising, behavioral finance, financial advising, financial advisor tools, financial risk tolerance. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1316357 Abstract: A crucial component to the success of any financial advising relationship is for the financial professional to understand the perceptions, preferences and thought-processes carried by the financial clients they serve. Armed with this information, financial professionals are more quickly able to understand how they can tailor their approach to best match the individual preferences and needs of each personal investor. Our research explores the use of a quantitative assessment tool in the financial services industry to assist in the identification of the personal investor’s consumer behaviors, especially in terms of financial risk tolerance, as it relates to their financial decision making. Through this process, the Unitifi Consumer Insight Tool (UCIT) was created and refined to capture and categorize personal investor financial behavioral categories and the financial personality tendencies of individuals prior to the initiation of a financial advisement relationship. This paper discusses the use of this tool to place individuals in one of four behavior-based financial risk tolerance categories. Our discoveries and research were aided through administration of a web-based survey to a group of over 1,000 individuals. Our findings indicate that it is possible to use a quantitative assessment tool to assist in predicting the behavioral tendencies of personal consumers when faced with consumer financial risk and decisions.
  • Earnings-Related Information, Cognitive Bias, and the Disposition Effect
    Authors: Chih-Hsiang Chang, Pei-Shan Kao, Keywords: Cognitive bias, role of media, disposition effect, earnings-related information, behavioral pitfall. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1132699 Abstract: This paper discusses the reaction of investors in the Taiwan stock market to the most probable unknown earnings-related information and the most probable known earnings-related information. As compared with the previous literature regarding the effect of an official announcement of earnings forecast revision, this paper further analyzes investors’ cognitive bias toward the unknown and known earnings-related information, and the role of media during the investors' reactions to the foresaid information shocks. The empirical results show that both the unknown and known earnings-related information provides useful information content for a stock market. In addition, cognitive bias and disposition effect are the behavioral pitfalls that commonly occur in the process of the investors' reactions to the earnings-related information. Finally, media coverage has a remarkable influence upon the investors' trading decisions.
  • E-Government Continuance Intention of Media Psychology: Some Insights from Psychographic Characteristics
    Authors: Azlina Binti Abu Bakar, Fahmi Zaidi Bin Abdul Razak, Wan Salihin Wong Abdullah, Keywords: Continuance intention, Malaysian citizens, media psychology, structural equation modeling. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1131407 Abstract: Psychographic is a psychological study of values, attitudes, interests and it is used mostly in prediction, opinion research and social research. This study predicts the influence of performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence and facilitating condition on e-government acceptance among Malaysian citizens. The survey responses of 543 e-government users have been validated and analyzed by means of covariance-based Structural Equation Modeling. The findings indicate that e-government acceptance among Malaysian citizens are mainly influenced by performance expectancy (β = 0.66, t = 11.53, p < 0.01) and social influence (β = 0.20, t = 4.23, p < 0.01). Surprisingly, there is no significant effect of facilitating condition and effort expectancy on e-government continuance intention (β = 0.01, t = 0.27, p > 0.05; β = -0.01, t = -0.40, p > 0.05). This study offers government and vendors a frame of reference to analyze citizen’s situation before initiating new innovations. In case of Malaysian e-government technology, adoption strategies should be built around fostering level of citizens’ technological expectation and social influence on e-government usage.
  • Identifying Common Behavioural Traits of Lone-Wolves in Recent Terrorist Attacks in Europe
    Authors: Khaled M. Khan, Armstrong Nhlabatsi, Keywords: Behavioral pattern, terrorism, profiling, commonality. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1131295 Abstract: This article attempts to analyse behavioural traits of lone-wolves who struck and killed innocents in six different attacks in Europe in last nine months. The main objective of this study is to develop a profiling template in order to capture commonality of characteristics of these attackers. This study tries to understand the homogeneity of lone-wolves in terms of their social background and state of mind. The commonality among them can possibly be used to build a profiling template that could help detecting vulnerable persons who are prone to be self-radicalised or radicalised by someone else. The result of this study provides us an understanding of their commonality in terms of their state of mind and social characteristics.
  • Impact of Flexibility on Patient Satisfaction and Behavioral Intention: A Critical Reassessment and Model Development
    Authors: Pradeep Kumar, Shibashish Chakraborty, Sasadhar Bera, Keywords: Healthcare, flexibility, patient satisfaction, behavioral intention. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1339994 Abstract: In the anticipation of demand fluctuations, services cannot be inventoried and hence it creates a difficult problem in marketing of services. The inability to meet customers (patients) requirements in healthcare context has more serious consequences than other service sectors. In order to meet patient requirements in the current uncertain environment, healthcare organizations are seeking ways for improved service delivery. Flexibility provides a mechanism for reducing variability in service encounters and improved performance. Flexibility is defined as the ability of the organization to cope with changing circumstances or instability caused by the environment. Patient satisfaction is an important performance outcome of healthcare organizations. However, the paucity of information exists in healthcare delivery context to examine the impact of flexibility on patient satisfaction and behavioral intention. The present study is an attempt to develop a conceptual foundation for investigating overall impact of flexibility on patient satisfaction and behavioral intention. Several dimensions of flexibility in healthcare context are examined and proposed to have a significant impact on patient satisfaction and intention. Furthermore, the study involves a critical examination of determinants of patient satisfaction and development of a comprehensive view the relationship between flexibility, patient satisfaction and behavioral intention. Finally, theoretical contributions and implications for healthcare professionals are suggested from flexibility perspective.
  • The Role of Counselling Psychology on Expatriate Adjustment in East Asia: A Systematic Review
    Authors: Panagiotis Platanitis, Keywords: Expatriates, adjustment, East Asia, counselling psychology. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1339670 Abstract: Purpose: This research paper seeks to review the empirical studies in the field of expatriate adjustment in East Asia in order to produce a thematic understanding of the current adjustment challenges, thus enabling practitioners to enrich their knowledge. Background: Learning to live, work, and function in a country and culture vastly different from that of one’s upbringing can pose some unique challenges in terms of adaptation and adjustment. This has led to a growing body of research about the adjustment of expatriate workers. Adjustment itself has been posited as a three-dimensional construct; work adjustment, interaction adjustment and general or cultural adjustment. Methodology: This qualitative systematic review has been conducted on all identified peer-reviewed empirical studies related to expatriate adjustment in East Asia. Five electronic databases (PsychInfo, Emerald, Scopus, EBSCO and JSTOR) were searched to December 2015. Out of 625 identified records, thorough evaluation for eligibility resulted in 15 relevant studies being subjected to data analysis. The quality of the identified research was assessed according to the Standard Quality Assessment Criteria for Evaluating Primary Research Papers from a Variety of Fields. The data were analysed by means of thematic synthesis for systematic reviews of qualitative research. Findings: Data analysis revealed five key themes. The themes developed were: (1) personality traits (2) types of adjustment, (3) language, (4) culture and (5) coping strategies. Types of adjustment included subthemes such as: Interaction, general, work, psychological, sociocultural and cross-cultural adjustment. Conclusion: The present review supported previous literature on the different themes of adjustment and it takes the focus from work and general adjustment to the psychological challenges and it introduces the psychological adjustment. It also gives a different perspective about the use of cross-cultural training and the coping strategies expatriates use when they are abroad. This review helps counselling psychologists to understand the importance of a multicultural approach when working with expatriates and also to be aware of what expatriates might face when working and living in East Asia.
  • The Effect of Religious Tourist Motivation and Satisfaction on Behavioral Intention
    Authors: Tao Zhang, Nan Yan, Keywords: Behavioral intension, motivation, religious tourism, satisfaction. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1126535 Abstract: In recent years, the Chaoshan area, a special place located in the southeast of Guangdong province in China, actively protects religious heritage and is developing religious tourism, which is attracting many expatriate Chinese who are coming back for travel and to worship. This paper discussed three questions. Firstly, what is the current situation about the different social background of tourists’ motivation, satisfaction and behavioral intention? Secondly, is there a relationship between the motivation, satisfaction and behavioral intention and the different social backgrounds of tourists? Thirdly, what is the relationship between religious tourists’ motivation, satisfaction and behavioral intention? The research methods use a combination of qualitative analysis and quantitative analysis. Qualitative analysis uses the method of observation and interviews. Convenient sampling technique was used for quantitative analysis. The study showed that the different social backgrounds of tourists’ forms diverse cognition and experiences about religious tourism, and their motivations, satisfaction and behavioral intention as tourists vary. Tourists’ motivation and satisfaction has a positive phase relation. Tourists’ motivation with satisfaction as the intervening variable also has a positive phase effect on tourists’ behavior intention. The result shows that religious tourists’ motivations include experiencing a religious atmosphere, and having a rest and recreation. The result also shows that religious tourists want to travel with their family members and friends. While traveling, religious tourists like to talk with Buddhist monks or nuns. Compared to other tourism types, religious tourists have higher expectations about temple environment, traveling experience, peripheral service and temple management.
  • Qualitative Analysis of Current Child Custody Evaluation Practices
    Authors: Carolyn J. Ortega, Stephen E. Berger, Keywords: Forensic psychology, psychological testing, assessment methodology, child custody. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1125475 Abstract: The role of the custody evaluator is perhaps one of the most controversial and risky endeavors in clinical practice. Complaints filed with licensing boards regarding a child-custody evaluation constitute the second most common reason for such an event. Although the evaluator is expected to answer for the family-law court what is in the “best interest of the child,” there is a lack of clarity on how to establish this in any empirically validated manner. Hence, practitioners must contend with a nebulous framework in formulating their methodological procedures that inherently places them at risk in an already litigious context. This study sought to qualitatively investigate patterns of practice among doctoral practitioners conducting child custody evaluations in the area of Southern California. Ten psychologists were interviewed who devoted between 25 and 100% of their California private practice to custody work. All held Ph.D. degrees with a range of eight to 36 years of experience in custody work. Semi-structured interviews were used to investigate assessment practices, ensure adherence to guidelines, risk management, and qualities of evaluators. Forty-three Specific Themes were identified using Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Seven Higher Order Themes clustered on salient factors such as use of Ethics, Law, Guidelines; Parent Variables; Child Variables; Psychologist Variables; Testing; Literature; and Trends. Evaluators were aware of the ever-present reality of a licensure complaint and thus presented idiosyncratic descriptions of risk management considerations. Ambiguity about quantifying and validly tapping parenting abilities was also reviewed. Findings from this study suggested a high reliance on unstructured and observational methods in child custody practices.
  • Teaching English to Engineers: Between English Language Teaching and Psychology
    Authors: Irina-Ana Drobot, Keywords: Cognition, ESP, motivation, psychology. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1125117 Abstract: Teaching English to Engineers is part of English for Specific Purposes, a domain which is under the attention of English students especially under the current conditions of finding jobs and establishing partnerships outside Romania. The paper will analyse the existing textbooks together with the teaching strategies they adopt. Teaching English to Engineering students can intersect with domains such as psychology and cultural studies in order to teach them efficiently. Textbooks for students of ESP, ranging from those at the Faculty of Economics to those at the Faculty of Engineers, have shifted away from using specialized vocabulary, drills for grammar and reading comprehension questions and toward communicative methods and the practical use of language. At present, in Romania, grammar is neglected in favour of communicative methods. The current interest in translation studies may indicate a return to this type of method, since only translation specialists can distinguish among specialized terms and determine which are most suitable in a translation. Engineers are currently encouraged to learn English in order to do their own translations in their own field. This paper will analyse the issue of the extent to which it is useful to teach Engineering students to do translations in their field using cognitive psychology applied to language teaching, including issues such as motivation and social psychology. Teaching general English to engineering students can result in lack of interest, but they can be motivated by practical aspects which will help them in their field. This is why this paper needs to take into account an interdisciplinary approach to teaching English to Engineers.