GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE


General Psychology Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. General Psychology is a conference track under the Psychology Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Psychology.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Psychology).

General Psychology is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to General Psychology Conference Track will be held at “Psychology Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Paris, France in December 2021” .

General Psychology is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

XXIX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

XXX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

XXXI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2021
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

XXXII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2021
BANGKOK, THAILAND

XXXIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

II. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JUNE 26 - 27, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

V. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

FINISHED

VI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

VII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

VIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

IX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

X. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

XI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

FINISHED

XIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

FINISHED

XIV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

XV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XVI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

XVII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

FINISHED

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

FINISHED

XIX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

XX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

XXI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

XXII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

XXIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XXIV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

XXV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2021
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XXVI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2021
TOKYO, JAPAN

FINISHED

XXVII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2021
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

FINISHED

XXVIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

Psychology Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "General Psychology Conference"

  • Applying Bowen’s Theory to Intern Supervision
    Authors: Jeff A. Tysinger, Dawn P. Tysinger, Keywords: Family systems theory, intern supervision, triangulation, school psychology. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The aim of this paper is to theoretically apply Bowen’s understanding of triangulation and triads to school psychology intern supervision so that it can assist in the conceptualization of the dynamics of intern supervision and provide some key methods to address common issues. The school psychology internship is the capstone experience for the school psychologist in training. It involves three key participants whose relationships will determine the success of the internship.  To understand the potential effect, Bowen’s family systems theory can be applied to the supervision relationship. He describes a way to resolve stress between two people by triangulating or binging in a third person. He applies this to a nuclear family, but school psychology intern supervision requires the marriage of an intern, field supervisor, and university supervisor; thus, setting all up for possible triangulation. The consequences of triangulation can apply to standards and requirements, direct supervision, and intern evaluation. Strategies from family systems theory to decrease the negative impact of supervision triangulation.
  • The Impact of the General Data Protection Regulation on Human Resources Management in Schools
    Authors: Alexandra Aslanidou, Keywords: General data protection regulation, human resource management, educational system. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), concerning the protection of natural persons within the European Union with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data, became applicable in the European Union (EU) on 25 May 2018 and transformed the way personal data were being treated under the Data Protection Directive (DPD) regime, generating sweeping organizational changes to both public sector and business. A social practice that is considerably influenced in the way of its day-to-day operations is Human Resource (HR) management, for which the importance of GDPR cannot be underestimated. That is because HR processes personal data coming in all shapes and sizes from many different systems and sources. The significance of the proper functioning of an HR department, specifically in human-centered, service-oriented environments such as the education field, is decisive due to the fact that HR operations in schools, conducted effectively, determine the quality of the provided services and consequently have a considerable impact on the success of the educational system. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the decisive role that GDPR plays in HR departments that operate in schools and in order to practically evaluate the aftermath of the Regulation during the first months of its applicability; a comparative use cases analysis in five highly dynamic schools, across three EU Member States, was attempted.
  • The Desire to Know: Arnold’s Contribution to a Psychological Conceptualization of Academic Motivation
    Authors: F. Ruiz-Fuster, Keywords: Academic motivation, interests, desire to know, educational psychology, intellectual functions. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3298669 Abstract: Arnold’s redefinition of human motives can sustain a psychology of education which emphasizes the beauty of knowledge and the exercise of intellectual functions. Thus, education instead of focusing on skills and learning by doing would be centered on ‘the widest reaches of the human spirit’. One way to attain it is by developing children’s inherent interest. Arnold takes into account the fact that the desire to know is the inherent interest which leads students to explore and learn. She also emphasizes the need of exercising human functions as thinking, judging and reasoning. According to Arnold, the influence of psychological theories of motivation in education has derived in considering that all learning and school tasks should derive from children’s needs and impulses. The desire to know and the curiosity have not been considered as basic and active as any instinctive drive or basic need, so there has been an attempt to justify and understand how biological drives guide student’s learning. However, understanding motives and motivation not as a drive, an instinct or an impulse guided by our basic needs, but as a want that leads to action can help to understand, from a psychological perspective, how teachers can motivate students to learn, strengthening their desire and interest to reason and discover the whole new world of knowledge.
  • Modelling Conditional Volatility of Saving Rate by a Time-Varying Parameter Model
    Authors: Katleho D. Makatjane, Kalebe M. Kalebe, Keywords: Generalized autoregressive score, time-varying, saving rate, Lesotho. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1474469 Abstract: The present paper used time-varying parameters which are based on the score function of a probability density at time t to model volatility of saving rate. We used a scaled likelihood function to update the parameters of the model overtime. Our results revealed high diligence of time-varying since the location parameter is greater than zero. Furthermore, we discovered a leptokurtic condition on saving rate’s distribution. Kapetanios, Shin-Shell Nonlinear Augmented Dickey-Fuller (KSS-NADF) test showed that the saving rate has a nonlinear unit root; therefore, it can be modeled by a generalised autoregressive score (GAS) model. Additionally, value at risk (VaR) and conditional tail expectation (CTE) indicate that 99% of the time people in Lesotho are saving more than spending. This puts the economy in high risk of not expanding. Therefore, the monetary policy committee (MPC) of Lesotho should revise their monetary policies towards this high saving rates risk.
  • The Effect of Socio-Affective Variables in the Relationship between Organizational Trust and Employee Turnover Intention
    Authors: Paula A. Cruise, Carvell McLeary, Keywords: Context-specific organizational trust, cross-cultural psychology, theory of planned behavior, employee turnover intention. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1317276 Abstract: Employee turnover leads to lowered productivity, decreased morale and work quality, and psychological effects associated with employee separation and replacement. Yet, it remains unknown why talented employees willingly withdraw from organizations. This uncertainty is worsened as studies; a) priorities organizational over individual predictors resulting in restriction in range in turnover measurement; b) focus on actual rather than intended turnover thereby limiting conceptual understanding of the turnover construct and its relationship with other variables and; c) produce inconsistent findings across cultures, contexts and industries despite a clear need for a unified perspective. The current study addressed these gaps by adopting the theory of planned behavior (TPB) framework to examine socio-cognitive factors in organizational trust and individual turnover intentions among bankers and energy employees in Jamaica. In a comparative study of n=369 [nbank= 264; male=57 (22.73%); nenergy =105; male =45 (42.86)], it was hypothesized that organizational trust was a predictor of employee turnover intention, and the effect of individual, group, cognitive and socio-affective variables varied across industry. Findings from structural equation modelling confirmed the hypothesis, with a model of both cognitive and socio-affective variables being a better fit [CMIN (χ2) = 800.067, df = 364, p ≤ .000; CFI = 0.950; RMSEA = 0.057 with 90% C.I. (0.052 - 0.062); PCLOSE = 0.016; PNFI = 0.818 in predicting turnover intention. The findings are discussed in relation to socio-cognitive components of trust models and predicting negative employee behaviors across cultures and industries.
  • Competitor Analysis to Quantify the Benefits and for Different Use of Transport Infrastructure
    Authors: Dimitrios J. Dimitriou, Maria F. Sartzetaki, Keywords: Competitor analysis, generalized cost, transport economics, quantitative modelling. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1314524 Abstract: Different transportation modes have key operational advantages and disadvantages, providing a variety of different transport options to users and passengers. This paper reviews key variables for the competition between air transport and other transport modes. The aim of this paper is to review the competition between air transport and other transport modes, providing results in terms of perceived cost for the users, for destinations high competitiveness for all transport modes. The competitor analysis variables include the cost and time outputs for each transport option, highlighting the level of competitiveness on high demanded Origin-Destination corridors. The case study presents the output of a such analysis for the OD corridor in Greece that connects the Capital city (Athens) with the second largest city (Thessaloniki) and the different transport modes have been considered (air, train, road). Conventional wisdom is to present an easy to handle tool for planners, managers and decision makers towards pricing policy effectiveness and demand attractiveness, appropriate to use for other similar cases.
  • Application of Generalized Autoregressive Score Model to Stock Returns
    Authors: Katleho Daniel Makatjane, Diteboho Lawrence Xaba, Ntebogang Dinah Moroke, Keywords: Generalized autoregressive score model, stock returns, time-varying. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1132757 Abstract: The current study investigates the behaviour of time-varying parameters that are based on the score function of the predictive model density at time t. The mechanism to update the parameters over time is the scaled score of the likelihood function. The results revealed that there is high persistence of time-varying, as the location parameter is higher and the skewness parameter implied the departure of scale parameter from the normality with the unconditional parameter as 1.5. The results also revealed that there is a perseverance of the leptokurtic behaviour in stock returns which implies the returns are heavily tailed. Prior to model estimation, the White Neural Network test exposed that the stock price can be modelled by a GAS model. Finally, we proposed further researches specifically to model the existence of time-varying parameters with a more detailed model that encounters the heavy tail distribution of the series and computes the risk measure associated with the returns.
  • E-Government Continuance Intention of Media Psychology: Some Insights from Psychographic Characteristics
    Authors: Azlina Binti Abu Bakar, Fahmi Zaidi Bin Abdul Razak, Wan Salihin Wong Abdullah, Keywords: Continuance intention, Malaysian citizens, media psychology, structural equation modeling. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1131407 Abstract: Psychographic is a psychological study of values, attitudes, interests and it is used mostly in prediction, opinion research and social research. This study predicts the influence of performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence and facilitating condition on e-government acceptance among Malaysian citizens. The survey responses of 543 e-government users have been validated and analyzed by means of covariance-based Structural Equation Modeling. The findings indicate that e-government acceptance among Malaysian citizens are mainly influenced by performance expectancy (β = 0.66, t = 11.53, p < 0.01) and social influence (β = 0.20, t = 4.23, p < 0.01). Surprisingly, there is no significant effect of facilitating condition and effort expectancy on e-government continuance intention (β = 0.01, t = 0.27, p > 0.05; β = -0.01, t = -0.40, p > 0.05). This study offers government and vendors a frame of reference to analyze citizen’s situation before initiating new innovations. In case of Malaysian e-government technology, adoption strategies should be built around fostering level of citizens’ technological expectation and social influence on e-government usage.
  • Legal Doctrine on Rylands v. Fletcher: One more time on Feasibility of a General Clause of Strict Liability in the UK
    Authors: Maria Lubomira Kubica, Keywords: Abnormally dangerous activities, general clause, Rylands v. Fletcher, strict liability. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1340308 Abstract: The paper reveals the birth and evolution of the British precedent Rylands v. Fletcher that, once adopted on the other side of the Ocean (in United States), gave rise to a general clause of liability for abnormally dangerous activities recognized by the §20 of the American Restatements of the Law Third, Liability for Physical and Emotional Harm. The main goal of the paper was to analyze the development of the legal doctrine and of the case law posterior to the precedent together with the intent of the British judicature to leapfrog from the traditional rule contained in Rylands v. Fletcher to a general clause similar to that introduced in the United States and recently also on the European level. As it is well known, within the scope of tort law two different initiatives compete with the aim of harmonizing the European laws: European Group on Tort Law with its Principles of European Tort Law (hereinafter PETL) in which article 5:101 sets forth a general clause for strict liability for abnormally dangerous activities and Study Group on European Civil Code with its Common Frame of Reference (CFR) which promotes rather ad hoc model of listing out determined cases of strict liability. Very narrow application scope of the art. 5:101 PETL, restricted only to abnormally dangerous activities, stays in opposition to very broad spectrum of strict liability cases governed by the CFR. The former is a perfect example of a general clause that offers a minimum and basic standard, possibly acceptable also in those countries in which, like in the United Kingdom, this regime of liability is completely marginalized.
  • The Use of Facebook as a Social Media by Political Parties in the June 7 Election in Konya
    Authors: Yasemin Gülşen Yılmaz, Süleyman Hakan Yılmaz, Muhammet Erbay, Keywords: Social media, June 7 general elections, politics, Facebook. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1340134 Abstract: Social media is among the most important means of communication. Social media offers individuals and groups with an opportunity for participatory socialization over the internet, which is free of any time and place restrictions. Social media is a kind of interactive communication and bilateral social network. Various communication contents can be shared and put into mass circulation easily and quickly through social media. These sharings are not only limited to individuals but also happen to groups, institutions, and different constitutions. Their contents consist of any type of written message, audio and video files. We are living in the social media era now. It is not surprising that social media which has extensive communication facilities and massive prevalence is used in politics. Therefore, the use of social media (Facebook) by political parties during the Turkish general elections held on June 7, 2015, has been chosen as our research subject. Four parties namely, AKP, CHP, MHP and HDP who have the majority of votes in Turkey and participate in elections in Konya have been selected for our study. Their provincial centers’ and parliamentary candidates` use of social media (Facebook) on the last three days prior to the election have been examined and subjected to a qualitative analysis by means of content analysis.