COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE


Community Psychology Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Community Psychology is a conference track under the Psychology Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Psychology.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Psychology).

Community Psychology is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Community Psychology Conference Track will be held at “Psychology Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2021” - “Psychology Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Paris, France in December 2021” .

Community Psychology is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

XXVIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

XXIX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

XXX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

XXXI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2021
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

XXXII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2021
BANGKOK, THAILAND

XXXIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

II. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JUNE 26 - 27, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

V. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

FINISHED

VI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

VII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

VIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

IX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

X. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

XI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

FINISHED

XIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

FINISHED

XIV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

XV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XVI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

XVII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

FINISHED

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

FINISHED

XIX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

XX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

XXI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

XXII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

XXIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XXIV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

XXV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2021
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XXVI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2021
TOKYO, JAPAN

FINISHED

XXVII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2021
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

Psychology Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Community Psychology Conference"

  • Threshold Concepts in TESOL: A Thematic Analysis of Disciplinary Guiding Principles
    Authors: Neil Morgan, Keywords: TESOL, threshold concepts, TESOL principles, TESOL ITE/INSET, community of practice. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The notion of Threshold Concepts has offered a fertile new perspective on the transformative effects of mastery of particular concepts on student understanding of subject matter and their developing identities as inductees into disciplinary discourse communities. Only by successfully traversing essential knowledge thresholds can neophytes achieve the more sophisticated understandings of subject matter possessed by mature members of a discipline. This paper uses thematic analysis of disciplinary guiding principles to identify nine candidate Threshold Concepts that appear to underpin effective TESOL practice. The relationship between these candidate TESOL Threshold Concepts, TESOL principles, and TESOL instructional techniques appears to be amenable to a schematic representation based on superordinate categories of TESOL practitioner concern and, as such, offers an alternative to the view of Threshold Concepts as a privileged subset of disciplinary core concepts. The paper concludes by exploring the potential of a Threshold Concepts framework to productively inform TESOL initial teacher education (ITE) and in-service education and training (INSET).
  • The Effectiveness of Lesson Study via Learning Communities in Increasing Instructional Self-Efficacy of Beginning Special Educators
    Authors: David D. Hampton, Keywords: Lesson study, learning community, lesson study self-efficacy, new faculty. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Lesson study is used as an instructional technique to promote both student and faculty learning. However, little is known about the usefulness of learning communities in supporting results of lesson study on the self-efficacy and development for tenure-track faculty. This study investigated the impact of participation in a lesson study learning community on 34 new faculty members at a mid-size Midwestern University, specifically regarding implementing lesson study evaluations by new faculty on their reported self-efficacy. Results indicate that participation in a lesson study learning community significantly increased faculty members’ lesson study self-efficacy as well as grant and manuscript production over one academic year. Suggestions for future lesson study around faculty learning communities are discussed.
  • Applying Bowen’s Theory to Intern Supervision
    Authors: Jeff A. Tysinger, Dawn P. Tysinger, Keywords: Family systems theory, intern supervision, triangulation, school psychology. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The aim of this paper is to theoretically apply Bowen’s understanding of triangulation and triads to school psychology intern supervision so that it can assist in the conceptualization of the dynamics of intern supervision and provide some key methods to address common issues. The school psychology internship is the capstone experience for the school psychologist in training. It involves three key participants whose relationships will determine the success of the internship.  To understand the potential effect, Bowen’s family systems theory can be applied to the supervision relationship. He describes a way to resolve stress between two people by triangulating or binging in a third person. He applies this to a nuclear family, but school psychology intern supervision requires the marriage of an intern, field supervisor, and university supervisor; thus, setting all up for possible triangulation. The consequences of triangulation can apply to standards and requirements, direct supervision, and intern evaluation. Strategies from family systems theory to decrease the negative impact of supervision triangulation.
  • Building Resilient Communities: The Traumatic Effect of Wildfire on Mati, Greece
    Authors: K. Vallianou, T. Alexopoulos, V. Plaka, M. K. Seleventi, V. Skanavis, C. Skanavis, Keywords: Community resilience, natural disasters, place attachment, wildfire. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The present research addresses the role of place attachment and emotions in community resiliency and recovery within the context of a disaster. Natural disasters represent a disruption in the normal functioning of a community, leading to a general feeling of disorientation. This study draws on the trauma caused by a natural hazard such as a forest fire. The changes of the sense of togetherness are being assessed. Finally this research determines how the place attachment of the inhabitants was affected during the reorientation process of the community. The case study area is Mati, a small coastal town in eastern Attica, Greece. The fire broke out on July 23rd, 2018. A quantitative research was conducted through questionnaires via phone interviews, one year after the disaster, to address community resiliency in the long-run. The sample was composed of 159 participants from the rural community of Mati plus 120 coming from Skyros Island that was used as a control group. Inhabitants were prompted to answer items gauging their emotions related to the event, group identification and emotional significance of their community, and place attachment before and a year after the fire took place. Importantly, the community recovery and reorientation were examined within the context of a relative absence of government backing and official support. Emotions related to the event were aggregated into 4 clusters related to: activation/vigilance, distress/disorientation, indignation, and helplessness. The findings revealed a decrease in the level of place attachment in the impacted area of Mati as compared to the control group of Skyros Island. Importantly, initial distress caused by the fire prompted the residents to identify more with their community and to report more positive feelings toward their community. Moreover, a mediation analysis indicated that the positive effect of community cohesion on place attachment one year after the disaster was mediated by the positive feelings toward the community. Finally, place attachment contributes to enhanced optimism and a more positive perspective concerning Mati’s future prospects. Despite an insufficient state support to this affected area, the findings suggest an important role of emotions and place attachment during the process of recovery. Implications concerning the role of emotions and social dynamics in meshing place attachment during the disaster recovery process as well as community resiliency are discussed.
  • Informative, Inclusive and Transparent Planning Methods for Sustainable Heritage Management
    Authors: Mathilde Kirkegaard, Keywords: Community, intangible, inclusion, planning, heritage. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The paper will focus on management of heritage that integrates the local community, and argue towards an obligation to integrate this social aspect in heritage management. By broadening the understanding of heritage, a sustainable heritage management takes its departure in more than a continual conservation of the physicality of heritage. The social aspect, or the local community, is in many govern heritage management situations being overlooked and it is not managed through community based urban planning methods, e.g.: citizen-inclusion, a transparent process, informative and inviting initiatives, etc. Historical sites are often being described by embracing terms such as “ours” and “us”: “our history” and “a history that is part of us”. Heritage is not something static, it is a link between the life that has been lived in the historical frames, and the life that is defining it today. This view on heritage is rooted in the strive to ensure that heritage sites, besides securing the national historical interest, have a value for those people who are affected by it: living in it or visiting it. Antigua Guatemala is a UNESCO-defined heritage site and this site is being ‘threatened’ by tourism, habitation and recreation. In other words: ‘the use’ of the site is considered a threat of the preservation of the heritage. Contradictory the same types of use (tourism and habitation) can also be considered development ability, and perhaps even a sustainable management solution. ‘The use’ of heritage is interlinked with the perspective that heritage sites ought to have a value for people today. In other words, the heritage sites should be comprised of a contemporary substance. Heritage is entwined in its context of physical structures and the social layer. A synergy between the use of heritage and the knowledge about the heritage can generate a sustainable preservation solution. The paper will exemplify this symbiosis with different examples of a heritage management that is centred around a local community inclusion. The inclusive method is not new in architectural planning and it refers to a top-down and bottom-up balance in decision making. It can be endeavoured through designs of an inclusive nature. Catalyst architecture is a planning method that strives to move the process of design solutions into the public space. Through process-orientated designs, or catalyst designs, the community can gain an insight into the process or be invited to participate in the process. A balance between bottom-up and top-down in the development process of a heritage site can, in relation to management measures, be understood to generate a socially sustainable solution. The ownership and engagement that can be created among the local community, along with the use that ultimately can gain an economic benefit, can delegate the maintenance and preservation. Informative, inclusive and transparent planning methods can generate a heritage management that is long-term due to the collective understanding and effort. This method handles sustainable management on two levels: the current preservation necessities and the long-term management, while ensuring a value for people today.
  • Residential and Care Model for Elderly People Based on “Internet Plus”
    Authors: Haoyi Sheng, Keywords: Ageing tendency, "Internet plus", community intelligent elderly care, elderly care service model, technology. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3462073 Abstract: China's aging tendency is becoming increasingly severe, which leads to the embarrassing situation of "getting old before getting wealthy". The traditional pension model does not comply with the need of today. Relying on "Internet Plus", it can efficiently integrate information and resources and meet the personalized needs of elderly care. It can reduce the operating cost of community elderly care facilities and lay a technical foundation for providing better services for the elderly. The key for providing help for the elderly in the future is to effectively integrate technology, make good use of technology, and improve the efficiency of elderly care services. The effective integration of traditional home care, community care, intelligent elderly care equipment and medical resources to create the "Internet Plus" community intelligent pension service mode has become the future development trend of aging care. The research method of this paper is to collect literature and conduct theoretical research on community pension firstly. Secondly, the combination of suitable aging design and "Internet Plus" is elaborated through research. Finally, this paper states the current level of intelligent technology in old-age care and looks into the future by understanding multiple levels of "Internet Plus". The development of community intelligent pension mode and content under "Internet Plus" has enormous development potential. In addition to the characteristics and functions of ordinary houses, residential design of endowment housing has higher requirements for comfort and personalization, and the people-oriented is the principle of design.
  • The Tourist Satisfaction on Brand Identity Design of Creative Agriculture Community Enterprise, Bang Khonthi District, Samut Songkhram Province
    Authors: Panupong Chanplin, Kathaleeya Chanda., Wilailuk Mepracha, Keywords: Satisfaction, brand identity, logo, creative agriculture community enterprise. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3299341 Abstract: The aims of this research were twofold: 1) to brand identity design of Creative Agriculture Community Enterprise, Bang Khonthi District, Samut Songkhram Province and 2) to study the level of tourist satisfaction towards brand identity design of Creative Agriculture Community Enterprise, Bang Khonthi District, Samut Songkhram Province. tourist satisfaction was measured using six criteria: clear brand positioning, likeable brand personality, memorable logo, attractive color palette, professional typography and on-brand supporting graphics. The researcher utilized a probability sampling method via simple random sampling. The sample consisted of 30 tourists in the Creative Agriculture Community Enterprise. Statistics utilized for data analysis were percentage, mean, and standard deviation. The results suggest that tourist had high levels of satisfaction towards all six criteria of the brand identity design that was designed to target them. This study proposes that specifically brand identity designed of Creative Agriculture Community Enterprise could also be implemented with other real media already available on the market.
  • The Desire to Know: Arnold’s Contribution to a Psychological Conceptualization of Academic Motivation
    Authors: F. Ruiz-Fuster, Keywords: Academic motivation, interests, desire to know, educational psychology, intellectual functions. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3298669 Abstract: Arnold’s redefinition of human motives can sustain a psychology of education which emphasizes the beauty of knowledge and the exercise of intellectual functions. Thus, education instead of focusing on skills and learning by doing would be centered on ‘the widest reaches of the human spirit’. One way to attain it is by developing children’s inherent interest. Arnold takes into account the fact that the desire to know is the inherent interest which leads students to explore and learn. She also emphasizes the need of exercising human functions as thinking, judging and reasoning. According to Arnold, the influence of psychological theories of motivation in education has derived in considering that all learning and school tasks should derive from children’s needs and impulses. The desire to know and the curiosity have not been considered as basic and active as any instinctive drive or basic need, so there has been an attempt to justify and understand how biological drives guide student’s learning. However, understanding motives and motivation not as a drive, an instinct or an impulse guided by our basic needs, but as a want that leads to action can help to understand, from a psychological perspective, how teachers can motivate students to learn, strengthening their desire and interest to reason and discover the whole new world of knowledge.
  • Analysis of Risk-Based Disaster Planning in Local Communities
    Authors: R. A. Temah, L. A. Nkengla-Asi, Keywords: Capabilities, disaster planning, hazards, local community, risk-based. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2571942 Abstract: Planning for future disasters sets the stage for a variety of activities that may trigger multiple recurring operations and expose the community to opportunities to minimize risks. Local communities are increasingly embracing the necessity for planning based on local risks, but are also significantly challenged to effectively plan and response to disasters. This research examines basic risk-based disaster planning model and compares it with advanced risk-based planning that introduces the identification and alignment of varieties of local capabilities within and out of the local community that can be pivotal to facilitate the management of local risks and cascading effects prior to a disaster. A critical review shows that the identification and alignment of capabilities can potentially enhance risk-based disaster planning. A tailored holistic approach to risk based disaster planning is pivotal to enhance collective action and a reduction in disaster collective cost.
  • Investigating the Role of Community in Heritage Conservation through the Ladder of Citizen Participation Approach: Case Study, Port Said, Egypt
    Authors: Sara S. Fouad, Omneya Messallam, Keywords: Al-Afrang/Port Said, community participation, heritage conservation, ladder of citizen participation, NGOs. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2021845 Abstract: Egypt has countless prestigious buildings and diversity of cultural heritage which are located in many cities. Most of the researchers, archaeologists, stakeholders and governmental bodies are paying more attention to the big cities such as Cairo and Alexandria, due to the country’s centralization nature. However, there are other historic cities that are grossly neglected and in need of emergency conservation. For instance, Port Said which is a former colonial city that was established in nineteenth century located at the edge of the northeast Egyptian coast between the Mediterranean Sea and the Suez Canal. This city is chosen because it presents one of the important Egyptian archaeological sites that archive Egyptian architecture of the 19th and 20th centuries. The historic urban fabric is divided into three main districts; the Arab, the European (Al-Afrang), and Port Fouad. The European district is selected to be the research case study as it has culture diversity, significant buildings, and includes the largest number of the listed heritage buildings in Port Said. Based on questionnaires and interviews, since 2003 several initiative trials have been taken by Alliance Francaise, the National Organization for Urban Harmony (NOUH), some Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), and few number of community residents to highlight the important city legacy and protect it from being demolished. Unfortunately, the limitation of their participation in decision-making policies is considered a crucial threat facing sustainable heritage conservation. Therefore, encouraging the local community to participate in their architecture heritage conservation would create a self-confident one, capable of making decisions for the city’s future development. This paper aims to investigate the role of the local inhabitants in protecting their buildings heritage through listing the community level of participations twice (2012 and 2018) in preserving their heritage based on the ladder citizen participation approach. Also, it is to encourage community participation in order to promote city architecture conservation, heritage management, and sustainable development. The methodology followed in this empirical research involves using several data assembly methods such as structural observations, questionnaires, interviews, and mental mapping. The questionnaire was distributed among 92 local inhabitants aged 18-60 years. However, the outset of this research at the beginning demonstrated the majority negative attitude, motivation, and confidence of the local inhabitants’ role to safeguard their architectural heritage. Over time, there was a change in the negative attitudes. Therefore, raising public awareness and encouraging community participation by providing them with a real opportunity to take part in the decision-making. This may lead to a positive relationship between the community residents and the built heritage, which is essential for promoting its preservation and sustainable development.