CONSUMER BEHAVIOR CONFERENCE


Consumer Behavior Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Consumer Behavior is a conference track under the Psychology Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Psychology.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Psychology).

Consumer Behavior is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Consumer Behavior Conference Track will be held at “Psychology Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2020” - “Psychology Conference in Paris, France in July 2020” - “Psychology Conference in New York, United States in August 2020” - “Psychology Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2020” - “Psychology Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Psychology Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2020” - “Psychology Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2020” - “Psychology Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2020” - “Psychology Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2020” - “Psychology Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2020” - “Psychology Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” - “Psychology Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2021” - “Psychology Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2021” - “Psychology Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Paris, France in July 2021” - “Psychology Conference in New York, United States in August 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2021” - “Psychology Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2021” - “Psychology Conference in Paris, France in December 2021” .

Consumer Behavior is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

Final Call

IX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

X. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

XI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

XII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

XIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

XIV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

XV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20PC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20PC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20PC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20PC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20PC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline January 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21PC02GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline January 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21PC02GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline March 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21PC04ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 01, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21PC05TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 06, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21PC06US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline June 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21PC07FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2021
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline July 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21PC08US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2021
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21PC09JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2021
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21PC09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 22, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21PC10ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21PC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXX. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21PC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2021
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21PC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2021
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21PC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21PC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder
FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

II. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

JUNE 26 - 27, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

V. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

FINISHED

VI. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

VII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

VIII. INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

Psychology Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Consumer Behavior Conference"

  • On-Line Impulse Buying and Cognitive Dissonance: The Moderating Role of the Positive Affective State
    Authors: G. Mattia, A. Di Leo, L. Principato, Keywords: Cognitive dissonance, impulsive buying, online shopping, online consumer behavior. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The purchase impulsiveness is preceded by a lack of self-control: consequently, it is legitimate to believe that a consumer with a low level of self-control can result in a higher probability of cognitive dissonance. Moreover, the process of purchase is influenced by the pre-existing affective state in a considerable way. With reference to on-line purchases, digital behavior cannot be merely ascribed to the rational sphere, given the speed and ease of transactions and the hedonistic dimension of purchases. To our knowledge, this research is among the first cases of verification of the effect of moderation exerted by the positive affective state in the on-line impulse purchase of products with a high expressive value such as a smartphone on the occurrence of cognitive dissonance. To this aim, a moderation analysis was conducted on a sample of 212 impulsive millennials buyers. Three scales were adopted to measure the constructs of interest: IBTS for impulsivity, PANAS for the affective state, Sweeney for cognitive dissonance. The analysis revealed that positive affective state does not affect the onset of cognitive dissonance.
  • The Current Status of Middle Class Internet Use in China: An Analysis Based on the Chinese General Social Survey 2015 Data and Semi-Structured Investigation
    Authors: Abigail Qian Zhou, Keywords: China, internet use, middle class, network behavior, online marketing. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: In today's China, the well-educated middle class, with stable jobs and above-average income, are the driving force behind its Internet society. Through the analysis of data from the 2015 Chinese General Social Survey and 50 interviewees, this study investigates the current situation of this group’s specific internet usage. The findings of this study demonstrate that daily life among the members of this socioeconomic group is closely tied to the Internet. For Chinese middle class, the Internet is used to socialize and entertain self and others. It is also used to search for and share information as well as to build their identities. The empirical results of this study will provide a reference, supported by factual data, for enterprises seeking to target the Chinese middle class through online marketing efforts.
  • The Role of Branding for Success in the Georgian Tea Market
    Authors: Maia Seturi, Tamari Todua, Keywords: Marketing research, customer behavior, brand, successful brand. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Economic growth is seen as the increase in the production capacity of a country. It enables a country to produce more and more material wealth and social benefits. Today, the success of any product on the market is closely related to the issue of branding. The brand is a source of information for a user/consumer, which helps to simplify the choice of goods and reduce consumer risk. The paper studies the role of branding in order to promote Georgian tea brands. The main focus of the research is directed to consumer attitudes regarding Georgian tea brands. The methodology of the paper is based on marketing research. The findings study revealed that the majority of consumers prefer foreign tea brands. The final part of the article presents the main recommendations.
  • Consumer Perception of 3D Body Scanning While Online Shopping for Clothing
    Authors: A. Grilec, S. Petrak, M. Mahnic Naglic, Keywords: Consumer behavior, online shopping, 3D body scanning. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3346734 Abstract: Technological development and the globalization in production and sales of clothing in the last decade have significantly influenced the changes in consumer relationship with the industrial-fashioned apparel and in the way of clothing purchasing. The Internet sale of clothing is in a constant and significant increase in the global market, but the possibilities offered by modern computing technologies in the customization segment are not yet fully involved, especially according to the individual customer requirements and body sizes. Considering the growing trend of online shopping, the main goal of this paper is to investigate the differences in customer perceptions towards online apparel shopping and particularly to discover the main differences in perceptions between customers regarding three different body sizes. In order to complete the research goal, the quantitative study on the sample of 85 Croatian consumers was conducted in 2017 in Zagreb, Croatia. Respondents were asked to indicate their level of agreement according to a five-point Likert scale ranging from strongly disagree (1) to strongly agree (5). To analyze attitudes of respondents, simple and descriptive statistics were used. The main findings highlight the differences in respondent perception of 3D body scanning, using 3D body scanning in Internet shopping, online apparel shopping habits regarding their body sizes.
  • The Association between Affective States and Sexual/Health-Related Status among Men Who Have Sex with Men in China: An Exploration Study Using Social Media Data
    Authors: Zhi-Wei Zheng, Zhong-Qi Liu, Jia-Ling Qiu, Shan-Qing Guo, Zhong-Wei Jia, Chun Hao, Keywords: Affect, men who have sex with men, sexual-related behaviors, health-related status, social media. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3300466 Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of this study was to understand and examine the association between diurnal mood variation and sexual/health-related status among men who have sex with men (MSM) using data from MSM Chinese Twitter messages. The study consists of 843,745 postings of 377,610 MSM users located in Guangdong that were culled from the MSM Chinese Twitter App. Positive affect, negative affect, sexual related behaviors, and health-related status were measured using the Simplified Chinese Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count. Emotions, including joy, sadness, anger, fear, and disgust were measured using the Weibo Basic Mood Lexicon. A positive sentiment score and a positive emotions score were also calculated. Linear regression models based on a permutation test were used to assess associations between affective states and sexual/health-related status. In the results, 5,871 active MSM users and their 477,374 postings were finally selected. MSM expressed positive affect and joy at 8 a.m. and expressed negative affect and negative emotions between 2 a.m. and 4 a.m. In addition, 25.1% of negative postings were directly related to health and 13.4% reported seeking social support during that sensitive period. MSM who were senior, educated, overweight or obese, self-identified as performing a versatile sex role, and with less followers, more followers, and less chat groups mainly expressed more negative affect and negative emotions. MSM who talked more about sexual-related behaviors had a higher positive sentiment score (β=0.29, p < 0.001) and a higher positive emotions score (β = 0.16, p < 0.001). MSM who reported more on their health status had a lower positive sentiment score (β = -0.83, p < 0.001) and a lower positive emotions score (β = -0.37, p < 0.001). The study concluded that psychological intervention based on an app for MSM should be conducted, as it may improve mental health.
  • A Study on the Factors Affecting Student Behavior Intention to Attend Robotics Courses at the Primary and Secondary School Levels
    Authors: Jingwen Shan, Keywords: TAM, learning behavior intentions, robot courses, primary and secondary school students. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3299745 Abstract: In order to explore the key factors affecting the robot program learning intention of school students, this study takes the technology acceptance model as the theoretical basis and invites 167 students from Jiading District of Shanghai as the research subjects. In the robot course, the model of school students on their learning behavior is constructed. By verifying the causal path relationship between variables, it is concluded that teachers can enhance students’ perceptual usefulness to robotics courses by enhancing subjective norms, entertainment perception, and reducing technical anxiety, such as focusing on the gradual progress of programming and analyzing learner characteristics. Students can improve perceived ease of use by enhancing self-efficacy. At the same time, robot hardware designers can optimize in terms of entertainment and interactivity, which will directly or indirectly increase the learning intention of the robot course. By changing these factors, the learning behavior of primary and secondary school students can be more sustainable.
  • Factors Influencing Intention to Engage in Long-term Care Services among Nursing Aide Trainees and the General Public
    Authors: Ju-Chun Chien, Keywords: Long-term care services, nursing aide trainees, Taiwanese people, theory of planned behavior. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3299658 Abstract: Rapid aging and depopulation could lead to serious problems, including workforce shortages and health expenditure costs. The current and predicted future LTC workforce shortages could be a real threat to Taiwan’s society. By means of comparison of data from 144 nursing aide trainees and 727 general public, the main purpose of the present study was to determine whether there were any notable differences between the two groups toward engaging in LTC services. Moreover, this study focused on recognizing the attributes of the general public who had the willingness to take LTC jobs but continue to ride the fence. A self-developed questionnaire was designed based on Ajzen’s Theory of Planned Behavior model. After conducting exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and reliability analysis, the questionnaire was a reliable and valid instrument for both nursing aide trainees and the general public. The main results were as follows: Firstly, nearly 70% of nursing aide trainees showed interest in LTC jobs. Most of them were middle-aged female (M = 46.85, SD = 9.31), had a high school diploma or lower, had unrelated work experience in healthcare, and were mostly unemployed. The most common reason for attending the LTC training program was to gain skills in a particular field. The second most common reason was to obtain the license. The third and fourth reasons were to be interested in caring for people and to increase income. The three major reasons that might push them to leave LTC jobs were physical exhaustion, payment is bad, and being looked down on. Secondly, the variables that best-predicted nursing aide trainees’ intention to engage in LTC services were having personal willingness, perceived behavior control, with high school diploma or lower, and supported from family and friends. Finally, only 11.80% of the general public reported having interest in LTC jobs (the disapproval rating was 50% for the general public). In comparison to nursing aide trainees who showed interest in LTC settings, 64.8% of the new workforce for LTC among the general public was male and had an associate degree, 54.8% had relevant healthcare experience, 67.1% was currently employed, and they were younger (M = 32.19, SD = 13.19) and unmarried (66.3%). Furthermore, the most commonly reason for the new workforce to engage in LTC jobs were to gain skills in a particular field. The second priority was to be interested in caring for people. The third and fourth most reasons were to give back to society and to increase income, respectively. The top five most commonly reasons for the new workforce to quitting LTC jobs were listed as follows: physical exhaustion, being looked down on, excessive working hours, payment is bad, and excessive job stress.
  • Gender Differences in Risk Aversion Behavior: Case Study of Saudi Arabia and Jordan
    Authors: Razan Salem, Keywords: Arab region, financial risk behavior, gender differences, women investors. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Men and women have different approaches towards investing, both in terms of strategies and risk attitudes. This study aims to focus mainly on investigating the financial risk behaviors of Arab women investors and to examine the financial risk tolerance levels of Arab women relative to Arab men investors. Using survey data on 547 Arab men and women investors, the results of Wilcoxon Signed-Rank (One-Sample) test Mann-Whitney U test reveal that Arab women are risk-averse investors and have lower financial risk tolerance levels relative to Arab men. Such findings can be explained by the fact of women's nature and lower investment literacy levels. Further, the current political uncertainty in the Arab region may be considered as another explanation of Arab women’s risk aversion behavior. The study's findings support the existing literature by validating the stereotype of “women are more risk-averse than men” in the Arab region. Overall, when it comes to investment and financial behaviors, women around the world behave similarly.
  • Behavioral Mapping and Post-Occupancy Evaluation of Meeting-Point Design in an International Airport
    Authors: Meng-Cong Zheng, Yu-Sheng Chen, Keywords: Meeting point design, post-occupancy evaluation, behavioral mapping, international airport. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2643510 Abstract: The meeting behavior is a pervasive kind of interaction, which often occurs between the passenger and the shuttle. However, the meeting point set up at the Taoyuan International Airport is too far from the entry-exit, often causing passengers to stop searching near the entry-exit. When the number of people waiting for the rush hour increases, it often results in chaos in the waiting area. This study tried to find out what is the key factor to promote the rapid finding of each other between the passengers and the pick-ups. Then we implemented several design proposals to improve the meeting behavior of passengers and pick-ups based on behavior mapping and post-occupancy evaluation to enhance their meeting efficiency in unfamiliar environments. The research base is the reception hall of the second terminal of Taoyuan International Airport. Behavioral observation and mapping are implemented on the entry of inbound passengers into the welcome space, including the crowd distribution of the people who rely on the separation wall in the waiting area, the behavior of meeting and the interaction between the inbound passengers and the pick-ups. Then we redesign the space planning and signage design based on post-occupancy evaluation to verify the effectiveness of space plan and signage design. This study found that passengers ignore existing meeting-point designs which are placed on distant pillars at both ends. The position of the screen affects the area where the receiver is stranded, causing the pick-ups to block the passenger's moving line. The pick-ups prefer to wait where it is easy to watch incoming passengers and where it is closest to the mode of transport they take when leaving. Large visitors tend to gather next to landmarks, and smaller groups have a wide waiting area in the lobby. The location of the meeting point chosen by the pick-ups is related to the view of the incoming passenger. Finally, this study proposes an improved design of the meeting point, setting the traffic information in it, so that most passengers can see the traffic information when they enter the country. At the same time, we also redesigned the pick-ups desk to improve the efficiency of passenger meeting.
  • Attitude towards the Consumption of Social Media: Analyzing Young Consumers’ Travel Behavior
    Authors: Farzana Sharmin, Mohammad Tipu Sultan, Benqian Li, Keywords: Social media, theory of planned behavior, travel behavior, young consumer. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2576918 Abstract: Advancement of new media technology and consumption of social media have altered the way of communication in the tourism industry, mostly for consumers’ travel planning, online purchase, and experience sharing activity. There is an accelerating trend among young consumers’ to utilize this new media technology. This paper aims to analyze the attitude of young consumers’ about social media use for travel purposes. The convenience random sample method used to collect data from an urban area of Shanghai (China), consists of 225 young consumers’. This survey identified behavioral determinants of social media consumption by the extended theory of planned behavior (TPB). The instrument developed support on previous research to test hypotheses. The results of structural analyses indicate that attitude towards the use of social media is affected by external factors such as availability and accessibility of technology. In addition, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control have partially influenced the attitude of respondents’. The results of this study could help to improve social media travel marketing and promotional strategies for respective groups.