URBAN DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE


Urban Development Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Urban Development is a conference track under the Architecture and Urban Planning Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Architecture and Urban Planning.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Architecture and Urban Planning).

Urban Development is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Urban Development Conference Track will be held at “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Paris, France in July 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in New York, United States in August 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” .

Urban Development is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

VII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline March 16, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC04ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

VIII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 01, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC05TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

IX. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 06, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC06US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

X. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

XI. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline July 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC08US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC09JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIV. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 22, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC10ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XV. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVI. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIX. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder
FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

V. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

FINISHED

VI. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

Architecture and Urban Planning Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Urban Development Conference"

  • The Necessity of Urban Boundaries in Planning Legislation: A Case Study in Bilecik, Turkey
    Authors: Mercan Efe Güney, Barış Parlatangiller, Melik Ayer, Keywords: Agriculture, boundary, city planning, development plan, legislation. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: In Turkey, while urban area boundaries are enlarged by making decisions on investment areas in cities, development plans are made according to government decisions, rather than scientific criteria. Even environment protection laws state that “if public interest is at stake”, areas under mandatory protection can be transformed into investment areas. This leads to destruction of valuable agricultural lands. Paper demonstrates loss of agricultural lands by superimposing plans, Suitability of the Lands for Agricultural Use and Google Earth Images in an exemplary settlement, and expresses that urban area boundaries should be included in legislation as an official boundary for all settlements.
  • A Framework and Case Study for Sustainable Development of Urban Areas
    Authors: Yasaman Zeinali, Farid Khosravikia, Keywords: Environmental impacts of human activities, sustainability, urban planning. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3593210 Abstract: This paper presents a multi-objective framework for sustainable urban development. The proposed framework aims to address different aspects of sustainability in urban development planning. These aspects include, but are not limited to education, health, job opportunities, architecture, culture, environment, mobility, energy, water, waste, and so on. Then, the proposed framework is applied to the Brackenridge Tract (an area in downtown Austin, Texas), to redevelop that area in a sustainable way. The detail of the implementation process is presented in this paper. The ultimate goal of this paper is to develop a sustainable area in downtown Austin with ensuring that it locally meets the needs of present and future generations with respect to economic, social, environmental, health as well as cultural aspects. Moreover, it helps the city with the population growth problem by accommodating more people in that area.
  • Social Interaction Dynamics Exploration: The Case Study of El Sherouk City
    Authors: Nardine El Bardisy, Wolf Reuter, Ayat Ismail, Keywords: New urban communities, modern planning, social Interaction, Social life. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3566397 Abstract: In Egypt, there is continuous housing demand as a result of rapid population growth. In 1979, this forced the government to establish new urban communities in order to decrease stress around delta. New Urban Communities Authority (NUCA) was formulated to take the responsibly of this new policy. These communities suffer from social life deficiency due to their typology, which is separated island with barriers. New urban communities’ typology results from the influence of neoliberalism movement and modern city planning forms. The lack of social interaction in these communities at present should be enhanced in the future. On a global perspective, sustainable development calls for creating more sustainable communities which include social, economic and environmental aspects. From 1960, planners were highly focusing on the promotion of the social dimension in urban development plans. The research hypothesis states: “It is possible to promote social interaction in new urban communities through a set of socio-spatial recommended strategies that are tailored for Greater Cairo Region context”. In order to test this hypothesis, the case of El-Sherouk city is selected, which represents the typical NUCA development plans. Social interaction indicators were derived from literature and used to explore different social dynamics in the selected case. The tools used for exploring case study are online questionnaires, face to face questionnaires, interviews, and observations. These investigations were analyzed, conclusions and recommendations were set to improve social interaction.
  • Effect of Sodium Aluminate on Compressive Strength of Geopolymer at Elevated Temperatures
    Authors: Ji Hoi Heo, Jun Seong Park, Hyo Kim, Keywords: Compressive strength, fly ash based geopolymer, microstructure development, sodium aluminate. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3462105 Abstract: Geopolymer is an inorganic material synthesized by alkali activation of source materials rich in soluble SiO2 and Al2O3. Many researches have studied the effect of aluminum species on the synthesis of geopolymer. However, it is still unclear about the influence of Al additives on the properties of geopolymer. The current study identified the role of the Al additive on the thermal performance of fly ash based geopolymer and observing the microstructure development of the composite. NaOH pellets were dissolved in water for 14 M (14 moles/L) sodium hydroxide solution which was used as an alkali activator. The weight ratio of alkali activator to fly ash was 0.40. Sodium aluminate powder was employed as an Al additive and added in amounts of 0.5 wt.% to 2 wt.% by the weight of fly ash. The mixture of alkali activator and fly ash was cured in a 75°C dry oven for 24 hours. Then, the hardened geopolymer samples were exposed to 300°C, 600°C and 900°C for 2 hours, respectively. The initial compressive strength after oven curing increased with increasing sodium aluminate content. It was also observed in SEM results that more amounts of geopolymer composite were synthesized as sodium aluminate was added. The compressive strength increased with increasing heating temperature from 300°C to 600°C regardless of sodium aluminate addition. It was consistent with the ATR-FTIR results that the peak position related to asymmetric stretching vibrations of Si-O-T (T: Si or Al) shifted to higher wavenumber as the heating temperature increased, indicating the further geopolymer reaction. In addition, geopolymer sample with higher content of sodium aluminate showed better compressive strength. It was also reflected on the IR results by more shift of the peak position assigned to Si-O-T toward the higher wavenumber. However, the compressive strength decreased after being exposed to 900°C in all samples. The degree of reduction in compressive strength was decreased with increasing sodium aluminate content. The deterioration in compressive strength was most severe in the geopolymer sample without sodium aluminate additive, while the samples with sodium aluminate addition showed better thermal durability at 900°C. This is related to the phase transformation with the occurrence of nepheline phase at 900°C, which was most predominant in the sample without sodium aluminate. In this work, it was concluded that sodium aluminate could be a good additive in the geopolymer synthesis by showing the improved compressive strength at elevated temperatures.
  • Scheduling of Bus Fleet Departure Time Based on Mathematical Model of Number of Bus Stops for Municipality Bus Organization
    Authors: Ali Abdi Kordani, Hamid Bigdelirad, Sid Mohammad Boroomandrad, Keywords: Number of optimized stops, organizing bus system, scheduling, urban transit. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3462083 Abstract: Operating Urban Bus Transit System is a phenomenon that has a major role in transporting passengers in cities. There are many factors involved in planning and operating an Urban Bus Transit System, one of which is selecting optimized number of stops and scheduling of bus fleet departure. In this paper, we tried to introduce desirable methodology to select number of stops and schedule properly. Selecting the right number of stops causes convenience in accessibility and reduction in travel time and finally increase in public preference of this transportation mode. The achieved results revealed that number of stops must reduce from 33 to 25. Also according to scheduling and conducted economic analysis, the number of buses must decrease from 17 to 11 to have the most appropriate status for the Bus Organization.
  • The Renewal Strategy for Ancient Residential Area in Small and Medium-Sized Cities Based on Field Research of Changshu City in China
    Authors: Yun Zhang, Zhu Wang, Keywords: Ancient residential area, Changshu, city renewal strategy, small and medium-sized cities. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Renewing ancient residential areas is an integral part of the sustainable development of modern cities. Compared with a metropolis, the old areas of small and medium-sized cities is more complicated to update, as the spatial form is more fragmented. In this context, the author takes as the research object, the ancient town of Changshu City, which is a small city representative in China with a history of more than 1,200 years. Through the analysis of urban research and update projects, the spatial evolution characteristics and renewal strategies of small ancient urban settlements are studied. On this basis, it is proposed to protect the residential area from the perspective of integrity and sustainability, strengthen the core public part, control the district building, and reshape the important interface. Renewing small and medium-sized urban areas should respect the rhythm of their own urban development and gradually complete the update, not blindly copying the experience of large cities.
  • A Preliminary Study of the Reconstruction of Urban Residential Public Space in the Context of the “Top-down” Construction Model in China: Based on Research of TianZiFang District in Shanghai and Residential Space in Hangzhou
    Authors: Wang Qiaowei, Gao Yujiang, Keywords: Rapid urbanization, traditional street space, space re-construction, bottom-up design. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: With the economic growth and rapid urbanization after the reform and openness, some of China's fast-growing cities have demolished former dwellings and built modern residential quarters. The blind, incomplete reference to western modern cities and the one-off construction lacking feedback mechanism have intensified such phenomenon, causing the citizen gradually expanded their living scale with the popularization of car traffic, and the peer-to-peer lifestyle gradually settled. The construction of large-scale commercial centers has caused obstacles to small business around the residential areas, leading to space for residents' interaction has been compressed. At the same time, the advocated Central Business District (CBD) model even leads to the unsatisfactory reconstruction of many historical blocks such as the Hangzhou Southern Song Dynasty Imperial Street. However, the popularity of historical spaces such as Wuzhen and Hongcun also indicates the collective memory and needs of the street space for Chinese residents. The evolution of Shanghai TianZiFang also proves the importance of the motivation of space participants in space construction in the context of the “top-down” construction model in China. In fact, there are frequent occurrences of “reconstruction”, which may redefine the space, in various residential areas. If these activities can be selectively controlled and encouraged, it will be beneficial to activate the public space as well as the residents’ intercourse, so that the traditional Chinese street space can be reconstructed in the context of modern cities.
  • Exploring the Correlation between Population Distribution and Urban Heat Island under Urban Data: Taking Shenzhen Urban Heat Island as an Example
    Authors: Wang Yang, Keywords: POI, satellite remote sensing, the population distribution, urban heat island thermal map. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Shenzhen is a modern city of China's reform and opening-up policy, the development of urban morphology has been established on the administration of the Chinese government. This city`s planning paradigm is primarily affected by the spatial structure and human behavior. The subjective urban agglomeration center is divided into several groups and centers. In comparisons of this effect, the city development law has better to be neglected. With the continuous development of the internet, extensive data technology has been introduced in China. Data mining and data analysis has become important tools in municipal research. Data mining has been utilized to improve data cleaning such as receiving business data, traffic data and population data. Prior to data mining, government data were collected by traditional means, then were analyzed using city-relationship research, delaying the timeliness of urban development, especially for the contemporary city. Data update speed is very fast and based on the Internet. The city's point of interest (POI) in the excavation serves as data source affecting the city design, while satellite remote sensing is used as a reference object, city analysis is conducted in both directions, the administrative paradigm of government is broken and urban research is restored. Therefore, the use of data mining in urban analysis is very important. The satellite remote sensing data of the Shenzhen city in July 2018 were measured by the satellite Modis sensor and can be utilized to perform land surface temperature inversion, and analyze city heat island distribution of Shenzhen. This article acquired and classified the data from Shenzhen by using Data crawler technology. Data of Shenzhen heat island and interest points were simulated and analyzed in the GIS platform to discover the main features of functional equivalent distribution influence. Shenzhen is located in the east-west area of China. The city’s main streets are also determined according to the direction of city development. Therefore, it is determined that the functional area of the city is also distributed in the east-west direction. The urban heat island can express the heat map according to the functional urban area. Regional POI has correspondence. The research result clearly explains that the distribution of the urban heat island and the distribution of urban POIs are one-to-one correspondence. Urban heat island is primarily influenced by the properties of the underlying surface, avoiding the impact of urban climate. Using urban POIs as analysis object, the distribution of municipal POIs and population aggregation are closely connected, so that the distribution of the population corresponded with the distribution of the urban heat island.
  • Demonstration of Land Use Changes Simulation Using Urban Climate Model
    Authors: Barbara Vojvodikova, Katerina Jupova, Iva Ticha, Keywords: Heat islands, land use, urban climate model. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Cities in their historical evolution have always adapted their internal structure to the needs of society (for example protective city walls during classicism era lost their defense function, became unnecessary, were demolished and gave space for new features such as roads, museums or parks). Today it is necessary to modify the internal structure of the city in order to minimize the impact of climate changes on the environment of the population. This article discusses the results of the Urban Climate model owned by VITO, which was carried out as part of a project from the European Union's Horizon grant agreement No 730004 Pan-European Urban Climate Services Climate-Fit city. The use of the model was aimed at changes in land use and land cover in cities related to urban heat islands (UHI). The task of the application was to evaluate possible land use change scenarios in connection with city requirements and ideas. Two pilot areas in the Czech Republic were selected. One is Ostrava and the other Hodonín. The paper provides a demonstration of the application of the model for various possible future development scenarios. It contains an assessment of the suitability or inappropriateness of scenarios of future development depending on the temperature increase. Cities that are preparing to reconstruct the public space are interested in eliminating proposals that would lead to an increase in temperature stress as early as in the assignment phase. If they have evaluation on the unsuitability of some type of design, they can limit it into the proposal phases. Therefore, especially in the application of models on Local level - in 1 m spatial resolution, it was necessary to show which type of proposals would create a significant temperature island in its implementation. Such a type of proposal is considered unsuitable. The model shows that the building itself can create a shady place and thus contribute to the reduction of the UHI. If it sensitively approaches the protection of existing greenery, this new construction may not pose a significant problem. More massive interventions leading to the reduction of existing greenery create a new heat island space.
  • Evaluation of Hazardous Status of Avenue Trees in University of Port Harcourt
    Authors: F. S. Eguakun, T. C. Nkwor, Keywords: Avenue tree, hazard status, inventory, urban. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3300415 Abstract: Trees in the university environment are uniquely position; however, they can also present a millstone to the infrastructure and humans they coexist with. The numerous benefits of trees can be negated due to poor tree health and anthropogenic activities and as such can become hazardous. The study aims at evaluating the hazardous status of avenue trees in University of Port Harcourt. Data were collected from all the avenue trees within the selected major roads in the University. Tree growth variables were measured and health condition of the avenue trees were assessed as an indicator of some structural defects. The hazard status of the avenue trees was determined. Several tree species were used as avenue trees in the University however, Azadirachta indica (81%) was found to be most abundant. The result shows that only 0.3% avenue tree species was found to pose severe harzard in Abuja part of the University. Most avenue trees (55.2%) were rated as medium hazard status. Due to the danger and risk associated with hazardous trees, the study recommends that good and effective management strategies be implemented so as to prevent future damages from trees with small or medium hazard status.