BUILDING CONSTRUCTION CONFERENCE


Building Construction Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Building Construction is a conference track under the Architecture and Urban Planning Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Architecture and Urban Planning.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Architecture and Urban Planning).

Building Construction is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Building Construction Conference Track will be held at “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Paris, France in June 2019” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in London, United Kingdom in August 2019” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in New York, United States in October 2019” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Rome, Italy in December 2019” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2020” .

Building Construction is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

JUNE 26 - 27, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline May 30, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 13, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline July 22, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 19AUPC08GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 09 - 10, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline May 30, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 13, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 09, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 19AUPC10US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 11 - 12, 2019
ROME, ITALY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline May 30, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 13, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 12, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 19AUPC12IT
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 18 - 19, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline May 30, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 13, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline January 16, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC02GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline May 30, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 13, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline March 16, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC04ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder
FINISHED

INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

Architecture and Urban Planning Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Building Construction Conference"

  • Tokyo Skyscrapers: Technologically Advanced Structures in Seismic Areas
    Authors: J. Szolomicki, H. Golasz-Szolomicka, Keywords: Core structure, damping systems, high-rise buildings. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2643914 Abstract: The architectural and structural analysis of selected high-rise buildings in Tokyo is presented in this paper. The capital of Japan is the most densely populated city in the world and moreover is located in one of the most active seismic zones. The combination of these factors has resulted in the creation of sophisticated designs and innovative engineering solutions, especially in the field of design and construction of high-rise buildings. The foreign architectural studios (as, for Jean Nouvel, Kohn Pedesen Associates, Skidmore, Owings & Merill) which specialize in the designing of skyscrapers, played a major role in the development of technological ideas and architectural forms for such extraordinary engineering structures. Among the projects completed by them, there are examples of high-rise buildings that set precedents for future development. An essential aspect which influences the design of high-rise buildings is the necessity to take into consideration their dynamic reaction to earthquakes and counteracting wind vortices. The need to control motions of these buildings, induced by the force coming from earthquakes and wind, led to the development of various methods and devices for dissipating energy which occur during such phenomena. Currently, Japan is a global leader in seismic technologies which safeguard seismic influence on high-rise structures. Due to these achievements the most modern skyscrapers in Tokyo are able to withstand earthquakes with a magnitude of over seven degrees at the Richter scale. Damping devices applied are of a passive, which do not require additional power supply or active one which suppresses the reaction with the input of extra energy. In recent years also hybrid dampers were used, with an additional active element to improve the efficiency of passive damping.
  • Investigating the Accessibility of Physically Disabled Individuals in Corporate Offices: A Case of Dhaka City
    Authors: Ishrar Tabassum, Jay Andrew Saptok, Khalid Raihan Kabir, Elmee Tabassum, Keywords: Person with disability, PWD, corporate buildings, Dhaka City. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2643595 Abstract: The purpose of this study is to bring light to the current state of the working environments in the corporate environment and other such institutions with a particular focus on the Bangladesh National Building Code (BNBC) and its guidelines for accommodating the physically disabled. Data were collected via semi-formal interviews, site visits and focus groups conducted using a preset questionnaire as the guidelines. After conducting surveys at corporate offices of 20 organizations from major commercial sectors in Dhaka city, the auditing showed many inadequacies, as aside from the larger corporate offices, the offices have little to no accessibility for the physically disabled. This study hopes to shed light on the fact that the existing BNBCs lack of emphasis on ensuring the accessibility of the handicapped in corporate buildings in the hope that, in the future, the physically disabled will have greater opportunities at being productive members of the workforce.
  • LEED Empirical Evidence in Northern and Southern Europe
    Authors: Svetlana Pushkar, Keywords: Green building, Europe, LEED, regional priority points. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2576912 Abstract: The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) green building rating system is recognized in Europe. LEED uses regional priority (RP) points that are adapted to different environmental conditions. However, the appropriateness of the RP points is still a controversial question. To clarify this issue, two different parts of Europe: northern Europe (Finland and Sweden) and southern Europe (Turkey and Spain) were considered. Similarities and differences in the performances of LEED 2009-new construction (LEED-NC 2009) in these four countries were analyzed. It was found that LEED-NC 2009 performances in northern and southern parts of Europe in terms of Sustainable Sites (SS), Water Efficiency (WE), Materials and Resources (MR), and Indoor Environmental Quality (EQ) were similar, whereas in Energy and Atmosphere (EA), their performances were different. WE and SS revealed high performances (70-100%); EA and EQ demonstrated intermediate performance (40-60%); and MR displayed low performance (20-40%). It should be recommended introducing the following new RP points: for Turkey - water-related points and for all four observed countries - green power-related points for improving the LEED adaptation in Europe.
  • Effect of Columns Stiffness's and Number of Floors on the Accuracy of the Tributary Area Method
    Authors: Anas M. Fares, Keywords: Tributary area method, finite element method, ETABS, lateral load, axial loads, reinforced concrete, stiffness, multi-floor buildings. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2571708 Abstract: The using of finite element programs in analyzing and designing buildings are becoming very popular, but there are many engineers still using the tributary area method (TAM) in designing the structural members such as columns. This study is an attempt to investigate the accuracy of the TAM results with different load condition (gravity and lateral load), different floors numbers, and different columns stiffness's. To conduct this study, linear elastic analysis in ETABS program is used. The results from finite element method are compared to those obtained from TAM. According to the analysis of the data obtained, it can be seen that there is significance difference between the real load carried by columns and the load which is calculated by using the TAM. Thus, using 3-D models are the best choice to calculate the real load effected on columns and design these columns according to this load.
  • Automatic Thresholding for Data Gap Detection for a Set of Sensors in Instrumented Buildings
    Authors: Houda Najeh, Stéphane Ploix, Mahendra Pratap Singh, Karim Chabir, Mohamed Naceur Abdelkrim, Keywords: Building system, time series, diagnosis, outliers, delay, data gap. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2571656 Abstract: Building systems are highly vulnerable to different kinds of faults and failures. In fact, various faults, failures and human behaviors could affect the building performance. This paper tackles the detection of unreliable sensors in buildings. Different literature surveys on diagnosis techniques for sensor grids in buildings have been published but all of them treat only bias and outliers. Occurences of data gaps have also not been given an adequate span of attention in the academia. The proposed methodology comprises the automatic thresholding for data gap detection for a set of heterogeneous sensors in instrumented buildings. Sensor measurements are considered to be regular time series. However, in reality, sensor values are not uniformly sampled. So, the issue to solve is from which delay each sensor become faulty? The use of time series is required for detection of abnormalities on the delays. The efficiency of the method is evaluated on measurements obtained from a real power plant: an office at Grenoble Institute of technology equipped by 30 sensors.
  • A Review on Building Information Modelling in Nigeria and Its Potentials
    Authors: Mansur Hamma-Adama, Tahar Kouider, Keywords: Adoption, BIM, CAD, construction industry, Nigeria, opportunities. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2021965 Abstract: Construction Industry has been evolving since the development of Building Information Modelling (BIM). This technological process is unstoppable; it is out to the market with remarkable case studies of solving the long industry’s history of fragmentation. This industry has been changing over time; United States has recorded the most significant development in construction digitalization, Australia, United Kingdom and some other developed nations are also amongst promoters of BIM process and its development. Recently, a developing country like China and Malaysia are keying into the industry’s digital shift, while very little move is seen in South Africa whose development is considered higher and perhaps leader in the digital transition amongst the African countries. To authors’ best knowledge, Nigerian construction industry has never engaged in BIM discussions hence has no attention at national level. Consequently, Nigeria has no “Noteworthy BIM publications.” Decision makers and key stakeholders need to be informed on the current trend of the industry’s development (BIM in specific) and the opportunities of adopting this digitalization trend in relation to the identified challenges. BIM concept can be traced mostly in Architectural practices than engineering practices in Nigeria. A superficial BIM practice is found to be at organisational level only and operating a model based - “BIM stage 1.” Research to adopting this innovation has received very little attention. This piece of work is literature review based, aimed at exploring BIM in Nigeria and its prospects. The exploration reveals limitations in the literature availability as to extensive research in the development of BIM in the country. Numerous challenges were noticed including building collapse, inefficiencies, cost overrun and late project delivery. BIM has potentials to overcome the above challenges and even beyond. Low level of BIM adoption with reasonable level of awareness is noticed. However, lack of policy and guideline as well as serious lack of experts in the field are amongst the major barriers to BIM adoption. The industry needs to embrace BIM to possibly compete with its global counterpart.
  • Modernism’s Influence on Architect-Client Relationship: Comparative Case Studies of Schroder and Farnsworth Houses
    Authors: Omneya Messallam, Sara S. Fouad, Keywords: Architect’s character, Building’s performance, commonalities, client’s character, gender, modernist movement, needs. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1475018 Abstract: The Modernist Movement initially flourished in France, Holland, Germany and the Soviet Union. Many architects and designers were inspired and followed its principles. Two of its most important architects (Gerrit Rietveld and Ludwig Mies van de Rohe) were introduced in this paper. Each did not follow the other’s principles and had their own particular rules; however, they shared the same features of the Modernist International Style, such as Anti-historicism, Abstraction, Technology, Function and Internationalism/ Universality. Key Modernist principles translated into high expectations, which sometimes did not meet the inhabitants’ aspirations of living comfortably; consequently, leading to a conflict and misunderstanding between the designer and their clients’ needs. Therefore, historical case studies (the Schroder and the Farnsworth houses) involving two Modernist pioneer architects have been chosen. This paper is an attempt to explore some of the influential factors affecting buildings design such as: needs, gender, and question concerning commonalities between both designers and their clients. The three aspects and two designers explored here have been chosen because they have been influenced the researchers to understand the impact of those factors on the design process, building’s performance, and the dweller’s satisfaction. This is a descriptive/ analytical research based on two historical comparative case studies that involve several steps such as: key evaluation questions (KEQs), observations, document analysis, etc. The methodology is based on data collation and finding validations. The research aims to state a manifest to regulate the relation between architects and their clients to reach the optimum building performance and functional interior design that suits their clients’ needs, reflects the architects’ character, and the school they belong to. At the end, through the investigation in this paper, the different needs between both the designers and the clients have been seen not only in the building itself but also it could convert the inhabitant’s life in various ways. Moreover, a successful relationship between the architect and their clients could play a significant role in the success of projects. In contrast, not every good design or celebrated building could end up with a successful relationship between the designer and their client or full-fill the inhabitant’s aspirations.
  • Designing a Pre-Assessment Tool to Support the Achievement of Green Building Certifications
    Authors: Jisun Mo, Paola Boarin, Keywords: Barriers, certification process, green building rating systems, pre-assessment tool. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1474783 Abstract: The impact of common buildings on climate and environment has prompted people to get involved in the green building standards aimed at implementing rating tools or certifications. Thus, green building rating systems were introduced to the construction industry, and the demand for certified green buildings has increased gradually and succeeded considerably in enhancing people’s environmental awareness. However, the existing certification process has been unsatisfactory in attracting stakeholders and/or professionals who are actively engaged in adopting a rating system. It is because they have faced recurring barriers regarding limited information in understanding the rating process, time-consuming procedures and higher costs, which have a direct influence on pursuing green building rating systems. To promote the achievement of green building certifications within the building industry more successfully, this paper aims at designing a Pre-Assessment Tool (PAT) framework that can help stakeholders and/or professionals engaged in the construction industry to clarify their basic knowledge, timeframe and extra costs needed to activate a green building certification. First, taking the first steps towards the rating tool seems to be complicated because of upfront commitment to understanding the overall rating procedure is required. This conceptual PAT framework can increase basic knowledge of the rating tool and the certification process, mainly in terms of all resources or information of each credit requirements. Second, the assessment process of rating tools is generally known as a “lengthy and time-consuming system”, contributing to unenthusiastic reactions concerning green building projects. The proposed framework can predict the timeframe needed to identify how long it will take for a green project to process each credit requirement and the documentation required from the beginning of the certification process to final approval. Finally, most people often have the initial perception that pursuing green building certification costs more than constructing a non-green building, which makes it more difficult to execute rating tools. To overcome this issue, this PAT will help users to estimate the extra expenses such as certification fees and third-party contributions based on the track of the amount of time it takes to implement the rating tool throughout all the related stages. Also, it can prevent unexpected or hidden costs occurring in the process of assessment. Therefore, this proposed PAT framework can be recommended as an effective method to support the decision-making of inexperienced users and play an important role in promoting green building certification.
  • Optimisation of Structural Design by Integrating Genetic Algorithms in the Building Information Modelling Environment
    Authors: Tofigh Hamidavi, Sepehr Abrishami, Pasquale Ponterosso, David Begg, Keywords: Building Information Modelling, BIM, Genetic Algorithm, GA, architecture-engineering-construction, AEC, Optimisation, structure, design, population, generation, selection, mutation, crossover, offspring. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1474597 Abstract: Structural design and analysis is an important and time-consuming process, particularly at the conceptual design stage. Decisions made at this stage can have an enormous effect on the entire project, as it becomes ever costlier and more difficult to alter the choices made early on in the construction process. Hence, optimisation of the early stages of structural design can provide important efficiencies in terms of cost and time. This paper suggests a structural design optimisation (SDO) framework in which Genetic Algorithms (GAs) may be used to semi-automate the production and optimisation of early structural design alternatives. This framework has the potential to leverage conceptual structural design innovation in Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) projects. Moreover, this framework improves the collaboration between the architectural stage and the structural stage. It will be shown that this SDO framework can make this achievable by generating the structural model based on the extracted data from the architectural model. At the moment, the proposed SDO framework is in the process of validation, involving the distribution of an online questionnaire among structural engineers in the UK.
  • The Effect of Critical Activity on Critical Path and Project Duration in Precedence Diagram Method
    Authors: J. Nisar, S. Halim, Keywords: Construction project management, critical path method, project scheduling, precedence diagram method. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1474541 Abstract: The additional relationships i.e., start-to-start, finish-to-finish, and start-to-finish, between activity in Precedence Diagram Method (PDM) provides a more flexible schedule than traditional Critical Path Method (CPM). But, changing the duration of critical activities in the PDM network will have an anomalous effect on the critical path and the project completion date. In this study, we classified the critical activities in two groups i.e., 1. activity on single critical path and 2. activity on multi-critical paths, and six classes i.e., normal, reverse, neutral, perverse, decrease-reverse and increase-normal, based on their effects on project duration in PDM. Furthermore, we determined the maximum float of time by which the duration each type of critical activities can be changed without effecting the project duration. This study would help the project manager to clearly understand the behavior of each critical activity on critical path, and he/she would be able to change the project duration by shortening or lengthening activities based on project budget and project deadline.