BUILT ENVIRONMENTS CONFERENCE


Built Environments Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Built Environments is a conference track under the Architecture and Urban Planning Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Architecture and Urban Planning.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Architecture and Urban Planning).

Built Environments is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Built Environments Conference Track will be held at “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Rome, Italy in December 2019” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Paris, France in July 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in New York, United States in August 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” .

Built Environments is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

V. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

VI. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

VII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

VIII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 01, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC05TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

IX. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

JUNE 04 - 05, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 06, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC06US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

X. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline June 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC07FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XI. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline July 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC08US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC09JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 17 - 18, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIV. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 22 - 23, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 22, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC10ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XV. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVI. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 05 - 06, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 17 - 18, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIX. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder
FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

Architecture and Urban Planning Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Built Environments Conference"

  • Durability of Slurry Infiltrated Fiber Concrete to Corrosion in Chloride Environment: An Experimental Study, Part I
    Authors: M. F. Alrubaie, S. A. Salih, W. A. Abbas, Keywords: Chloride attack, chloride environments, corrosion inhibitor, corrosion resistance, durability, SIFCON, Slurry infiltrated fiber concrete. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Slurry infiltrated fiber concrete (SIFCON) is considered as a special type of high strength high-performance fiber reinforced concrete, extremely strong, and ductile. The objective of this study is to investigate the durability of SIFCON to corrosion in chloride environments. Six different SIFCON mixes were made in addition to two refinance mixes with 0% and 1.5% steel fiber content. All mixes were exposed to 10% chloride solution for 180 days. Half of the specimens were partially immersed in chloride solution, and the others were exposed to weekly cycles of wetting and drying in 10% chloride solution. The effectiveness of using corrosion inhibitors, mineral admixture, and epoxy protective coating were also evaluated as protective measures to reduce the effect of chloride attack and to improve the corrosion resistance of SIFCON mixes. Corrosion rates, half-cell potential, electrical resistivity, total permeability tests had been monitored monthly. The results indicated a significant improvement in performance for SIFCON mixes exposed to chloride environment, when using corrosion inhibitor or epoxy protective coating, whereas SIFCON mix contained mineral admixture (metakaolin) did not improve the corrosion resistance at the same level. The cyclic wetting and drying exposure were more aggressive to the specimens than the partial immersion in chloride solution although the observed surface corrosion for the later was clearer.
  • A Numerical Study on the Seismic Performance of Built-Up Battened Columns
    Authors: Sophia C. Alih, Mohammadreza Vafaei, Farnoud Rahimi Mansour, Nur Hajarul Falahi Abdul Halim, Keywords: Battened column, built-up column, cyclic behavior, seismic design, steel column. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1130651 Abstract: Built-up columns have been widely employed by practice engineers in the design and construction of buildings and bridges. However, failures have been observed in this type of columns in previous seismic events. This study analyses the performance of built-up columns with different configurations of battens when it is subjected to seismic loads. Four columns with different size of battens were simulated and subjected to three different intensities of axial load along with a lateral cyclic load. Results indicate that the size of battens influences significantly the seismic behavior of columns. Lower shear capacity of battens results in higher ultimate strength and ductility for built-up columns. It is observed that intensity of axial load has a significant effect on the ultimate strength of columns, but it is less influential on the yield strength. For a given drift value, the stress level in the centroid of smaller size battens is significantly more than that of larger size battens signifying damage concentration in battens rather than chords. It is concluded that design of battens for shear demand lower than code specified values only slightly reduces initial stiffness of columns; however, it improves seismic performance of battened columns.
  • Mechanical Strengths of Self-Compacting Mortars Prepared with the Pozzolanic Cement in Aggressive Environments
    Authors: M. Saidi, I. Djefour, F. Ait Medjber, A. Melouane, A. Gacem, Keywords: Aggressive environments, durability, mechanical strengths, pozzolanic cement, self-compacting mortar. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1340088 Abstract: The objective of this research is to study the physical and mechanical properties and durability of self-compacting mortars prepared by substituting a part of cement up to a percentage of 30% pozzolan according to different Blaine specific surface area (SSB1=7000 cm2/g and SSB=9000 cm2/g)). Order to evaluate durability, mortars were subjected to chemical attacks in various aggressive environments, a solution of a mixture of nitric acid and ammonium nitrate (HNO3 + NH4NO3) and a magnesium sulfate salt solution (MgSO4)) with a concentration of 10%, for a period of one month. This study is complemented by a comparative study of the durability of mortars elaborated with sulphate resistant cement (SRC). The results show that these mortars develop long-term, mechanical and chemical resistance better than mortars based Portland cement with 5% gypsum (CEM 1) and SRC. We found that the mass losses are lowest in mortars elaborated with pozzolanic cement (30% substitution with SSB2) in both of chemical attack solutions (3.28% in the solution acid and 1.16% in the salt solution) and the compressive strength gains of 14.68% and 8.5% respectively in the two media. This is due to the action of pozzolan which fixes portlandite to form hydrated calcium silicate (CSH) from the hydration of tricalcic silicate (C3S).
  • Environmental Decision Making Model for Assessing On-Site Performances of Building Subcontractors
    Authors: Buket Metin, Keywords: Construction process, construction technology, decision making, environmental performance, subcontractors. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1127928 Abstract: Buildings cause a variety of loads on the environment due to activities performed at each stage of the building life cycle. Construction is the first stage that affects both the natural and built environments at different steps of the process, which can be defined as transportation of materials within the construction site, formation and preparation of materials on-site and the application of materials to realize the building subsystems. All of these steps require the use of technology, which varies based on the facilities that contractors and subcontractors have. Hence, environmental consequences of the construction process should be tackled by focusing on construction technology options used in every step of the process. This paper presents an environmental decision-making model for assessing on-site performances of subcontractors based on the construction technology options which they can supply. First, construction technologies, which constitute information, tools and methods, are classified. Then, environmental performance criteria are set forth related to resource consumption, ecosystem quality, and human health issues. Finally, the model is developed based on the relationships between the construction technology components and the environmental performance criteria. The Fuzzy Analytical Hierarchy Process (FAHP) method is used for weighting the environmental performance criteria according to environmental priorities of decision-maker(s), while the Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) method is used for ranking on-site environmental performances of subcontractors using quantitative data related to the construction technology components. Thus, the model aims to provide an insight to decision-maker(s) about the environmental consequences of the construction process and to provide an opportunity to improve the overall environmental performance of construction sites.
  • Decision Making during the Project Management Life Cycle of Infrastructure Projects
    Authors: Karrar Raoof Kareem Kamoona, Enas Fathi Taher AlHares, Zeynep Isik, Keywords: Leadership style, construction, decision-making, built environment. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1127034 Abstract: The various disciplines in the construction industry and the co-existence of the people in the various disciplines are what builds well-developed, closely-knit interpersonal skills at various hierarchical levels thus leading to a varied way of leadership. The varied decision making aspects during the lifecycle of a project include: autocratic, participatory and last but not least, free-rein. We can classify some of the decision makers in the construction industry in a hierarchical manner as follows: project executive, project manager, superintendent, office engineer and finally the field engineer. This survey looked at how decisions are made during the construction period by the key stakeholders in the project. From the paper it is evident that the three decision making aspects can be used at different times or at times together in order to bring out the best leadership decision. A blend of different leadership styles should be used to enhance the success rate during the project lifecycle.
  • A Study of the Planning and Designing of the Built Environment under the Green Transit-Oriented Development
    Authors: Wann-Ming Wey, Keywords: Green transit-oriented development, built environment, fuzzy Delphi technique, quality function deployment, fuzzy analytic network process. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1127024 Abstract: In recent years, the problems of global climate change and natural disasters have induced the concerns and attentions of environmental sustainability issues for the public. Aside from the environmental planning efforts done for human environment, Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) has been widely used as one of the future solutions for the sustainable city development. In order to be more consistent with the urban sustainable development, the development of the built environment planning based on the concept of Green TOD which combines both TOD and Green Urbanism is adapted here. The connotation of the urban development under the green TOD including the design toward environment protect, the maximum enhancement resources and the efficiency of energy use, use technology to construct green buildings and protected areas, natural ecosystems and communities linked, etc. Green TOD is not only to provide the solution to urban traffic problems, but to direct more sustainable and greener consideration for future urban development planning and design. In this study, we use both the TOD and Green Urbanism concepts to proceed to the study of the built environment planning and design. Fuzzy Delphi Technique (FDT) is utilized to screen suitable criteria of the green TOD. Furthermore, Fuzzy Analytic Network Process (FANP) and Quality Function Deployment (QFD) were then developed to evaluate the criteria and prioritize the alternatives. The study results can be regarded as the future guidelines of the built environment planning and designing under green TOD development in Taiwan.
  • The Planning and Development of Green Public Places in Urban South Africa: A Child-Friendly Approach
    Authors: E. J. Cilliers, Z. Goosen, Keywords: Built environment, child-friendly spaces, green spaces. public places, urban area. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1125427 Abstract: The impact that urban green spaces have on sustainability and quality of life is phenomenal. This is also true for the local South African environment. However, in reality green spaces in urban environments are decreasing due to growing populations, increasing urbanization and development pressure. This further impacts on the provision of child-friendly spaces, a concept that is already limited in local context. Child-friendly spaces are described as environments in which people (children) feel intimately connected to, influencing the physical, social, emotional, and ecological health of individuals and communities. The benefits of providing such spaces for the youth are well documented in literature. This research therefore aimed to investigate the concept of child-friendly spaces and its applicability to the South African planning context, in order to guide the planning of such spaces for future communities and use. Child-friendly spaces in the urban environment of the city of Durban, was used as local case study, along with two international case studies namely Mullerpier public playground in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, and Kadidjiny Park in Melville, Australia. The aim was to determine how these spaces were planned and developed and to identify tools that were used to accomplish the goal of providing successful child-friendly green spaces within urban areas. The need and significance of planning for such spaces was portrayed within the international case studies. It is confirmed that minimal provision is made for green space planning within the South African context, when there is reflected on the international examples. As a result international examples and disciples of providing child-friendly green spaces should direct planning guidelines within local context. The research concluded that child-friendly green spaces have a positive impact on the urban environment and assist in a child’s development and interaction with the natural environment. Regrettably, the planning of these child-friendly spaces is not given priority within current spatial plans, despite the proven benefits of such.
  • Crisis In/Out, Emergent, and Adaptive Urban Organisms
    Authors: Y. Hadjichristou, A. Swiny, M. Georgiou, Keywords: Adaptive built environments, crisis as opportunity, emergent urbanities, forces for inventions. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1338514 Abstract: This paper focuses on the questions raised through the work of Unit 5: ‘In/Out Crisis, emergent and adaptive’; an architectural research-based studio at [ARC] University of Nicosia. Students were asked to delve into state of Art Technologies in order to propose sustainable Emergent and Adaptive Architectures and Urbanities, the resulting unprecedented spatial conditions and atmospheres of the emergent new ways of living are deemed to be the ultimate aim of the investigation. Students explored a variety of sites and crisis conditions seen through their primary ingredient identified as soil, water and air and their paired combination. Within this methodology, crisis is seen as a mechanism for allowing an emergence of new and fascinating ultimate sustainable future cultures and cities by taking advantage of the primary materiality of the sites.
  • Courtyard Evolution in Contemporary Sustainable Living
    Authors: Yiorgos Hadjichristou, Keywords: Building as a verb, contemporary living, traditional bioclimatic wisdom, weather architecture. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1110093 Abstract: The paper will focus on the strategic development deriving from the evolution of the traditional courtyard spatial organization towards a new, contemporary sustainable way of living. New sustainable approaches that engulf the social issues, the notion of place, the understanding of weather architecture blended together with the bioclimatic behavior will be seen through a series of experimental case studies in the island of Cyprus, inspired and originated from its traditional wisdom, ranging from small scale of living to urban interventions. Weather and nature will be seen as co-architectural authors with architects. Furthermore, the building will be seen not as an object but rather as a vessel of human activities. This will further enhance the notion of merging the material and immaterial, the built and unbuilt, subject-human, and the object-building. This eventually will enable to generate the discussion of the understanding of the building in relation to the place and its inhabitants, where the human topography is more important than the material topography. The specificities of the divided island and the dealing with sites that are in vicinity with the diving Green Line will further trigger explorations dealing with the regeneration issues and the social sustainability offering unprecedented opportunities for innovative sustainable ways of living. Opening up a discourse with premises of weather-nature, materialimmaterial, human-material topographies in relation to the contested sites of the borders will lead us to develop innovative strategies for a profound, both technical and social sustainability, which fruitfully yields to innovative living built environments, responding to the ever changing environmental and social needs. As a starting point, a case study in Kaimakli in Nicosia, a refurbishment with an extension of a traditional house, already engulfs all the traditional/ vernacular wisdom of the bioclimatic architecture. The project focusses on the direct and quite obvious bioclimatic features such as south orientation and cross ventilation. Furthermore, it tries to reinvent the adaptation of these parameters in order to turn the whole house to a contemporary living environment. In order to succeed this, evolutions of traditional architectural elements and spatial conditions are integrated in a way that does not only respond to some certain weather conditions, but they integrate and blend the weather within the built environment. A series of innovations aiming at maximum flexibility is proposed. The house can finally be transformed into a winter enclosure, while for the most part of the year it turns into a ‘camping’ living environment. Parallel to experimental interventions in existing traditional units, we will proceed examining the implementation of the same developed methodology in designing living units and complexes. Malleable courtyard organizations that attempt to blend the traditional wisdom with the contemporary needs for living, the weather and nature with the built environment will be seen tested in both horizontal and vertical developments. Social activities are seen as directly affected and forged by the weather conditions thus generating a new social identity of people where people are directly involved and interacting with the weather. The human actions and interaction with the built, material environment in order to respond to weather will be seen as the result of balancing the social with the technological sustainability, the immaterial, and the material aspects of the living environment.
  • Urban Form, Heritage, and Disaster Prevention: What Do They Have in Common?
    Authors: Milton Montejano Castillo, Tarsicio Pastrana Salcedo, Keywords: Conservation, disaster risk reduction, urban morphology, world heritage. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1108328 Abstract: Based on the hypothesis that disaster risk is constructed socially and historically, this article shows the importance of keeping alive the historical memory of disaster by means of architectural and urban heritage conservation. This is illustrated with three examples of Latin American World Heritage cities, where disasters like floods and earthquakes have shaped urban form. Therefore, the study of urban form or "Urban Morphology" is proposed as a tool to understand and analyze urban transformations with the documentation of the occurrence of disasters. Lessons learned from such cities may be useful to reduce disasters risk in contemporary built environments.