SMART CITIES CONFERENCE


Smart Cities Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Smart Cities is a conference track under the Transport and Environment Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Transport and Environment.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Transport and Environment).

Smart Cities is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Smart Cities Conference Track will be held at “Transport and Environment Conference in Rome, Italy in December 2019” - “Transport and Environment Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Paris, France in July 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in New York, United States in August 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” .

Smart Cities is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

V. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

VI. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

VII. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

VIII. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 01, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE05TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

IX. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

JUNE 04 - 05, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 06, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE06US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

X. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline June 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE07FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XI. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline July 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE08US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XII. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE09JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIII. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 17 - 18, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIV. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 22 - 23, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 22, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE10ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XV. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVI. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 05 - 06, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVII. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 17 - 18, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIX. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder
FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

Transport and Environment Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Smart Cities Conference"

  • Designing a Socio-Technical System for Groundwater Resources Management, Applying Smart Energy and Water Meter
    Authors: S. Mahdi Sadatmansouri, Maryam Khalili, Keywords: Design Thinking, Human Centered Design, participatory management, Smart Energy and Water Meter (SEWM), socio-technical system, water table drawdown, Internet of Things, Gamification DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1316588 Abstract: World, nowadays, encounters serious water scarcity problem. During the past few years, by advent of Smart Energy and Water Meter (SEWM) and its installation at the electro-pumps of the water wells, one had believed that it could be the golden key to address the groundwater resources over-pumping issue. In fact, implementation of these Smart Meters managed to control the water table drawdown for short; but it was not a sustainable approach. SEWM has been considered as law enforcement facility at first; however, for solving a complex socioeconomic problem like shared groundwater resources management, more than just enforcement is required: participation to conserve common resources. The well owners or farmers, as water consumers, are the main and direct stakeholders of this system and other stakeholders could be government sectors, investors, technology providers, privet sectors or ordinary people. Designing a socio-technical system not only defines the role of each stakeholder but also can lubricate the communication to reach the system goals while benefits of each are considered and provided. Farmers, as the key participators for solving groundwater problem, do not trust governments but they would trust a fair system in which responsibilities, privileges and benefits are clear. Technology could help this system remained impartial and productive. Social aspects provide rules, regulations, social objects and etc. for the system and help it to be more human-centered. As the design methodology, Design Thinking provides probable solutions for the challenging problems and ongoing conflicts; it could enlighten the way in which the final system could be designed. Using Human Centered Design approach of IDEO helps to keep farmers in the center of the solution and provides a vision by which stakeholders’ requirements and needs are addressed effectively. Farmers would be considered to trust the system and participate in their groundwater resources management if they find the rules and tools of the system fair and effective. Besides, implementation of the socio-technical system could change farmers’ behavior in order that they concern more about their valuable shared water resources as well as their farm profit. This socio-technical system contains nine main subsystems: 1) Measurement and Monitoring system, 2) Legislation and Governmental system, 3) Information Sharing system, 4) Knowledge based NGOs, 5) Integrated Farm Management system (using IoT), 6) Water Market and Water Banking system, 7) Gamification, 8) Agribusiness ecosystem, 9) Investment system.
  • Determining the Spatial Vulnerability Levels and Typologies of Coastal Cities to Climate Change: Case of Turkey
    Authors: Mediha B. Sılaydın Aydın, Emine D. Kahraman, Keywords: Climate change, coastal cities, sea level rise, urban land use planning, vulnerability. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1128163 Abstract: One of the important impacts of climate change is the sea level rise. Turkey is a peninsula, so the coastal areas of the country are threatened by the problem of sea level rise. Therefore, the urbanized coastal areas are highly vulnerable to climate change. At the aim of enhancing spatial resilience of urbanized areas, this question arises: What should be the priority intervention subject in the urban planning process for a given city. To answer this question, by focusing on the problem of sea level rise, this study aims to determine spatial vulnerability typologies and levels of Turkey coastal cities based on morphological, physical and social characteristics. As a method, spatial vulnerability of coastal cities is determined by two steps as level and type. Firstly, physical structure, morphological structure and social structure were examined in determining spatial vulnerability levels. By determining these levels, most vulnerable areas were revealed as a priority in adaptation studies. Secondly, all parameters are also used to determine spatial typologies. Typologies are determined for coastal cities in order to use as a base for urban planning studies. Adaptation to climate change is crucial for developing countries like Turkey so, this methodology and created typologies could be a guide for urban planners as spatial directors and an example for other developing countries in the context of adaptation to climate change. The results demonstrate that the urban settlements located on the coasts of the Marmara Sea, the Aegean Sea and the Mediterranean respectively, are more vulnerable than the cities located on the Black Sea’s coasts to sea level rise.
  • The Linkage of Urban and Energy Planning for Sustainable Cities: The Case of Denmark and Germany
    Authors: Jens-Phillip Petersen, Keywords: Energy planning, urban planning, renewable energies, sustainable cities. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1123857 Abstract: The reduction of GHG emissions in buildings is a focus area of national energy policies in Europe, because buildings are responsible for a major share of the final energy consumption. It is at local scale where policies to increase the share of renewable energies and energy efficiency measures get implemented. Municipalities, as local authorities and responsible entity for land-use planning, have a direct influence on urban patterns and energy use, which makes them key actors in the transition towards sustainable cities. Hence, synchronizing urban planning with energy planning offers great potential to increase society’s energy-efficiency; this has a high significance to reach GHG-reduction targets. In this paper, the actual linkage of urban planning and energy planning in Denmark and Germany was assessed; substantive barriers preventing their integration and driving factors that lead to successful transitions towards a holistic urban energy planning procedures were identified.
  • An Investigation on Hot-Spot Temperature Calculation Methods of Power Transformers
    Authors: Ahmet Y. Arabul, Ibrahim Senol, Fatma Keskin Arabul, Mustafa G. Aydeniz, Yasemin Oner, Gokhan Kalkan, Keywords: Hot-spot temperature, monitoring system, power transformer, smart grid. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1111867 Abstract: In the standards of IEC 60076-2 and IEC 60076-7, three different hot-spot temperature estimation methods are suggested. In this study, the algorithms which used in hot-spot temperature calculations are analyzed by comparing the algorithms with the results of an experimental set-up made by a Transformer Monitoring System (TMS) in use. In tested system, TMS uses only top oil temperature and load ratio for hot-spot temperature calculation. And also, it uses some constants from standards which are on agreed statements tables. During the tests, it came out that hot-spot temperature calculation method is just making a simple calculation and not uses significant all other variables that could affect the hot-spot temperature.
  • Risk Assessment of Trace Element Pollution in Gymea Bay, NSW, Australia
    Authors: Yasir M. Alyazichi, Brian G. Jones, Errol McLean, Hamd N. Altalyan, Ali K. M. Al-Nasrawi, Keywords: Current track velocities, Gymea Bay, surface sediments, trace elements. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1110487 Abstract: The main purpose of this study is to assess the sediment quality and potential ecological risk in marine sediments in Gymea Bay located in south Sydney, Australia. A total of 32 surface sediment samples were collected from the bay. Current track trajectories and velocities have also been measured in the bay. The resultant trace elements were compared with the adverse biological effect values Effect Range Low (ERL) and Effect Range Median (ERM) classifications. The results indicate that the average values of chromium, arsenic, copper, zinc, and lead in surface sediments all reveal low pollution levels and are below ERL and ERM values. The highest concentrations of trace elements were found close to discharge points and in the inner bay, and were linked with high percentages of clay minerals, pyrite and organic matter, which can play a significant role in trapping and accumulating these elements. The lowest concentrations of trace elements were found to be on the shoreline of the bay, which contained high percentages of sand fractions. It is postulated that the fine particles and trace elements are disturbed by currents and tides, then transported and deposited in deeper areas. The current track velocities recorded in Gymea Bay had the capability to transport fine particles and trace element pollution within the bay. As a result, hydrodynamic measurements were able to provide useful information and to help explain the distribution of sedimentary particles and geochemical properties. This may lead to knowledge transfer to other bay systems, including those in remote areas. These activities can be conducted at a low cost, and are therefore also transferrable to developing countries. The advent of portable instruments to measure trace elements in the field has also contributed to the development of these lower cost and easily applied methodologies available for use in remote locations and low-cost economies.
  • Bowen Ratio in Western São Paulo State, Brazil
    Authors: Elaine C. Barboza, Antonio J. Machado, Keywords: Bowen ratio, medium-sized cities, surface energy balance, urban climate. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1109143 Abstract: This paper discusses micrometeorological aspects of the urban climate in three cities in Western São Paulo State: Presidente Prudente, Assis and Iepê. Particular attention is paid to the method used to estimate the components of the energy balance at the surface. Estimates of convective fluxes showed that the Bowen ratio was an indicator of the local climate and that its magnitude varied between 0.3 and 0.7. Maximum values for the Bowen ratio occurred earlier in Iepê (11:00 am) than in Presidente Prudente (4:00 pm). The results indicate that the Bowen ratio is modulated by the radiation balance at the surface and by different clusters of vegetation.
  • Investigation of Heating Behaviour of E-textile Structures
    Authors: H. Sezgin, S. Kursun Bahadır, Y. E. Boke, F. Kalaoğlu, Keywords: Conductive yarn, e-textiles, smart textiles, thermal analysis. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1100763 Abstract: By textile science incorporating with electronic industry, developed textile products start to take part in different areas such as industry, military, space, medical etc. for health, protection, defense, communication and automation. Electronic textiles (e-textiles) are fabrics that contain electronics and interconnections with them. In this study, two types of base yarns (cotton and acrylic) and three types of conductive steel yarns with different linear resistance values (14Ω/m, 30Ω/m, 70Ω/m) were used to investigate the effect of base yarn type and linear resistance of conductive yarns on thermal behavior of e-textile structures. Thermal behavior of samples was examined by thermal camera.
  • Pollution Control and Sustainable Urban Transport System - Electric Vehicle
    Authors: M.M. Al Emran Hasan, M.Ektesabi, A.Kapoor, Keywords: Electric Vehicle, Fossil Fuel, Internal CombustionEngine, Green House Gas, In wheel motor, Smart grid DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1333961 Abstract: Recently electric vehicles are becoming popular as an alternative of conventional fossil fuel vehicles. Conventional Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) vehicle uses fossil fuel which contributing a major part of overall carbon emission in the environment. Carbon and other green house gas emission are responsible for global warming and resulting climate change. It becomes vital to evaluate performance of vehicle based on emission. In this paper an effort has been made to depict the picture of emission caused by vehicle and scenario of Australia has taken into account. Effort has been made to compare the fossil based vehicle with electric vehicle in phases. The study also evaluates advancement in electric vehicle technology, required infrastructure for sustainability and future scope of developments. This paper also includes the evaluation of electric vehicle concept for pollution control and sustainable transport systems in future. This study can be a benchmark for development of electric vehicle as low carbon emission alternative for the cities of tomorrow.