ENVIRONMENTAL WASTE MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE


Environmental Waste Management Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Environmental Waste Management is a conference track under the Transport and Environment Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Transport and Environment.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Transport and Environment).

Environmental Waste Management is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Environmental Waste Management Conference Track will be held at “Transport and Environment Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Paris, France in July 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in New York, United States in August 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2020” - “Transport and Environment Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” .

Environmental Waste Management is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

VII. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

VIII. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

IX. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 31, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 06, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE06US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

X. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 31, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline June 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE07FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XI. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

XII. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 31, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE09JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIII. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 31, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIV. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 31, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 22, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE10ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XV. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 31, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVI. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 31, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVII. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 31, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 31, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIX. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 31, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20TE12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder
FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

V. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

FINISHED

VI. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

Transport and Environment Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Environmental Waste Management Conference"

  • Economic Model of Sustainable Value Chain in Passenger Waterway Transportation Service
    Authors: Maisa Sales Gama Tobias, Paulo Sérgio Lima Pereira Afonso, Keywords: value chain, sustainability, waterway transportation, cost management, cost model DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3686877 Abstract: The service of passenger waterway transportation lacks economic models that help in designing and implementing strategies to ensure its sustainability in several aspects (economic, social and environmental). The size of costs, though not the only one, is of particular importance in these models. However, traditionally, cost management has been focused only on reducing production costs, for the purpose of companies to keep prices low and gain market competitiveness. Although, with all the technological advances, and other restrictions imposed by the market in terms of service, in the case of passengers waterway transportation: intermodal competition; quality of service; or by regulatory environment for public concession and; in the aspect of business: to stay in the market with natural, demand and institutional restrictions, this view is not enough. Thus, there is an evolution of a traditional cost accounting to strategic cost management. On the other hand, it is important to consider other important dimensions and recognize that companies no longer exist in isolation, but they are part of highly integrated value and supplies chains. Therefore, this work will explore and analyze the sustainable value chain of passenger waterway transportation service using the tools of strategic cost management. The method will start from three components of analysis: (1) definition of basic elements of sustainable value chain; (2) identification of main restrictions to the chain development and aspects critical for service sustainability; (3) development of a cost model and propositions to overcome the bottlenecks found, to add value. Whether in the internal cost structure of the company; operational cost reduction strategies; in search of new markets, or to establish new partnerships or even; in the broadest level, in terms of investments in infrastructure or recommendations involving governance decisions to improve the current institutional environment. The case study will be developed in passenger transport companies located in the Lower Amazon, consolidated in this market, with defined enterprise structure of business sustainability, and who have already been willing to collaborate with the investigation. As results, it is expected to understand the cost structures that support sustainable value chains, namely, costs of activities and relevant cost objects in order to determine the cost drivers, profitability margins, cost reduction opportunities and conditions conducive to competitive advantages related to the different strategic options to cost leadership, differentiation or approach. Finally, in the model to be developed, the proper characterization of cost structure and value creation in transport processes under study may constitute reference points for future more sophisticated applied works of optimizing the resources involved and supporting the decision making, in particular with regard to operations research and quantitative methods more robust.
  • A Short Survey of Integrating Urban Agriculture and Environmental Planning
    Authors: Rayeheh Khatami, Toktam Hanaei, Mohammad Reza Mansouri Daneshvar, Keywords: Urban agriculture, environmental planning, urban planning, literature. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The growth of the agricultural sector is known as an essential way to achieve development goals in developing countries. Urban agriculture is a way to reduce the vulnerability of urban populations of the world toward global environmental change. It is a sustainable and efficient system to respond to the environmental, social and economic needs of the city, which leads to urban sustainability. Today, many local and national governments are developing urban agriculture as an effective tool in responding to challenges such as poverty, food security, and environmental problems. In this study, we follow a perspective based on urban agriculture literature in order to indicate the urban agriculture’s benefits in environmental planning strategies in non-western countries like Iran. The methodological approach adopted is based on qualitative approach and documentary studies. A total of 35 articles (mixed quantitative and qualitative methods studies) were studied in final analysis, which are published in relevant journals that focus on this subject. Studies show the wide range of positive benefits of urban agriculture on food security, nutrition outcomes, health outcomes, environmental outcomes, and social capital. However, there was no definitive conclusion about the negative effects of urban agriculture. This paper provides a conceptual and theoretical basis to know about urban agriculture and its roles in environmental planning, and also conclude the benefits of urban agriculture for researchers, practitioners, and policymakers who seek to create spaces in cities for implementation urban agriculture in future.
  • Mechanical Properties of Cement Slurry by Partially Substitution of Industry Waste Natural Pozzolans
    Authors: R. Ziaie Moayed, S. P. Emadoleslami Oskoei, S. D. Beladi Mousavi, A. Taleb Beydokhti, Keywords: Cement replacement, cement slurry, environmental threat, natural pozzolan, silica fume, waste material. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: There have been many reports of the destructive effects of cement on the environment in recent years. In the present research, it has been attempted to reduce the destructive effects of cement by replacing silica fume as adhesive materials instead of cement. The present study has attempted to improve the mechanical properties of cement slurry by using waste material from a glass production factory, located in Qazvin city of Iran, in which accumulation volume has become an environmental threat. The chemical analysis of the waste material indicates that this material contains about 94% of SiO2 and AL2O3 and has a close structure to silica fume. Also, the particle grain size test was performed on the mentioned waste. Then, the unconfined compressive strength test of the slurry was performed by preparing a mixture of water and adhesives with different percentages of cement and silica fume. The water to an adhesive ratio of this mixture is 1:3, and the curing process last 28 days. It was found that the sample had an unconfined compressive strength of about 300 kg/cm2 in a mixture with equal proportions of cement and silica fume. Besides, the sample had a brittle fracture in the slurry sample made of pure cement, however, the fracture in cement-silica fume slurry mixture is flexible and the structure of the specimen remains coherent after fracture. Therefore, considering the flexibility that is achieved by replacing this waste, it can be used to stabilize soils with cracking potential.
  • Investigating the Thermal Characteristics of Reclaimed Solid Waste from a Landfill Site Using Thermogravimetry
    Authors: S. M. Al-Salem, G.A. Leeke, H. J. Karam, R. Al-Enzi, A. T. Al-Dhafeeri, J. Wang, Keywords: Polymer, TGA, Pollution, Landfill, Waste, Plastic. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3593214 Abstract: Thermogravimetry has been popularized as a thermal characterization technique since the 1950s. It aims at investigating the weight loss against both reaction time and temperature, whilst being able to characterize the evolved gases from the volatile components of the organic material being tested using an appropriate hyphenated analytical technique. In an effort to characterize and identify the reclaimed waste from an unsanitary landfill site, this approach was initiated. Solid waste (SW) reclaimed from an active landfill site in the State of Kuwait was collected and prepared for characterization in accordance with international protocols. The SW was segregated and its major components were identified after washing and air drying. Shredding and cryomilling was conducted on the plastic solid waste (PSW) component to yield a material that is representative for further testing and characterization. The material was subjected to five heating rates (b) with minimal repeatable weight for high accuracy thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) following the recommendation of the International Confederation for Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry (ICTAC). The TGA yielded thermograms that showed an off-set from typical behavior of commercial grade resin which was attributed to contact of material with soil and thermal/photo-degradation.
  • Production and Recycling of Construction and Demolition Waste
    Authors: Vladimira Vytlacilova, Keywords: Recycling, Construction and demolition waste, Recycled rubble, Waste management. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3593144 Abstract: Recycling of construction and demolition waste (C&DW) and their new reuse in structures is one of the solutions of environmental problems. Construction and demolition waste creates a major portion of total solid waste production in the world and most of it is used in landfills all the time. The paper deals with the situation of the recycling of the building and demolition waste in the Czech Republic during the recent years. The paper is dealing with questions of C&D waste recycling, it also characterizes construction and demolition waste in general, furthermore it analyses production of construction waste and subsequent production of recycled materials.
  • The Role of Food System in Promoting Environmental Planning
    Authors: Rayeheh Khatami, Toktam Hanaei, Mohammad Reza Mansouri Daneshvar, Keywords: Urban agriculture, food system, environmental planning, agricultural garden, Mashhad. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3566393 Abstract: Today, many local and national governments are developing urban agriculture as an effective tool in responding to challenges such as food security, poverty and environmental problems. In fact, urban agriculture plays an important role in food system, which can provide citizens' income and become one of the components of economic, social and environmental systems. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the urban agriculture and urban food systems in order to understand the impact of urban foods production on environmental planning in non-western city region context. To achieve such objective, we carry out a case study in Mashhad city of Iran by using qualitative approaches. A survey on documentary studies and planning tools integrate with face to face interview with experts which explain the role of food system in environmental planning process. The paper extends the use of food in the environmental planning, specifically to examine this role to create agricultural garden as a mean to improve agricultural system in non-western country. The paper is concluded with a set of recommendations for researchers and policymakers who seek to create spaces in order to implement urban agriculture in cities for food justice.
  • Detergent Removal from Rinsing Water by Peroxi Electrocoagulation Process
    Authors: A. Benhadji, M. Taleb Ahmed, Keywords: Advanced oxidation processes, chemical oxygen demand, COD, detergent, peroxi electrocoagulation process, PEP, wastewater DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Among the various methods of treatment, advanced oxidation processes (AOP) are the most promising ones. In this study, Peroxi Electrocoagulation Process (PEP) was investigated for the treatment of detergent wastewater. The process was compared with electrooxidation treatment. The results showed that chemical oxygen demand (COD) was high 7584 mgO2.L-1, while the biochemical oxygen demand was low (250 mgO2.L-1). This wastewater was hardly biodegradable. Electrochemical process was carried out for the removal of detergent using a glass reactor with a volume of 1 L and fitted with three electrodes. A direct current (DC) supply was used. Samples were taken at various current density (0.0227 A/cm2 to 0.0378 A/cm2) and reaction time (1-2-3-4 and 5 hour). Finally, the COD was determined. The results indicated that COD removal efficiency of PEP was observed to increase with current intensity and reached to 77% after 5 h. The highest removal efficiency was observed after 5 h of treatment.
  • The South African Polycentric Water Resource Governance-Management Nexus: Parlaying an Institutional Agent and Structured Social Engagement
    Authors: J. H. Boonzaaier, A. C. Brent, Keywords: Institutional agent, water governance, polycentric water resource management, water resource management. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3346714 Abstract: South Africa, a water scarce country, experiences the phenomenon that its life supporting natural water resources is seriously threatened by the users that are totally dependent on it. South Africa is globally applauded to have of the best and most progressive water laws and policies. There are however growing concerns regarding natural water resource quality deterioration and a critical void in the management of natural resources and compliance to policies due to increasing institutional uncertainties and failures. These are in accordance with concerns of many South African researchers and practitioners that call for a change in paradigm from talk to practice and a more constructive, practical approach to governance challenges in the management of water resources. A qualitative theory-building case study through longitudinal action research was conducted from 2014 to 2017. The research assessed whether a strategic positioned institutional agent can be parlayed to facilitate and execute WRM on catchment level by engaging multiple stakeholders in a polycentric setting. Through a critical realist approach a distinction was made between ex ante self-deterministic human behaviour in the realist realm, and ex post governance-management in the constructivist realm. A congruence analysis, including Toulmin’s method of argumentation analysis, was utilised. The study evaluated the unique case of a self-steering local water management institution, the Impala Water Users Association (WUA) in the Pongola River catchment in the northern part of the KwaZulu-Natal Province of South Africa. Exploiting prevailing water resource threats, it expanded its ancillary functions from 20,000 to 300,000 ha. Embarking on WRM activities, it addressed natural water system quality assessments, social awareness, knowledge support, and threats, such as: soil erosion, waste and effluent into water systems, coal mining, and water security dimensions; through structured engagement with 21 different catchment stakeholders. By implementing a proposed polycentric governance-management model on a catchment scale, the WUA achieved to fill the void. It developed a foundation and capacity to protect the resilience of the natural environment that is critical for freshwater resources to ensure long-term water security of the Pongola River basin. Further work is recommended on appropriate statutory delegations, mechanisms of sustainable funding, sufficient penetration of knowledge to local levels to catalyse behaviour change, incentivised support from professionals, back-to-back expansion of WUAs to alleviate scale and cost burdens, and the creation of catchment data monitoring and compilation centres.
  • Analyzing Irbid’s Food Waste as Feedstock for Anaerobic Digestion
    Authors: Assal E. Haddad, Keywords: Food waste, solid waste management, anaerobic digestion, methane yield. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3346700 Abstract: Food waste samples from Irbid were collected from 5 different sources for 12 weeks to characterize their composition in terms of four food categories; rice, meat, fruits and vegetables, and bread. Average food type compositions were 39% rice, 6% meat, 34% fruits and vegetables, and 23% bread. Methane yield was also measured for all food types and was found to be 362, 499, 352, and 375 mL/g VS for rice, meat, fruits and vegetables, and bread, respectively. A representative food waste sample was created to test the actual methane yield and compare it to calculated one. Actual methane yield (414 mL/g VS) was greater than the calculated value (377 mL/g VS) based on food type proportions and their specific methane yield. This study emphasizes the effect of the types of food and their proportions in food waste on the final biogas production. Findings in this study provide representative methane emission factors for Irbid’s food waste, which represent as high as 68% of total Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) in Irbid, and also indicate the energy and economic value within the solid waste stream in Irbid.
  • Influence of Plastic Waste Reinforcement on Compaction and Consolidation Behavior of Silty Soil
    Authors: Maryam Meftahi, Yashar Hamidzadeh, Keywords: Silty soil, waste plastic, compaction, consolidation, reinforcement. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3299673 Abstract: In recent decades, the amount of solid waste production has been rising. In the meantime, plastic waste is one of the major parts of urban solid waste, so, recycling plastic waste from water bottles has become a serious challenge in the whole world. The experimental program includes the study of the effect of waste plastic fibers on maximum dry density (MDD), optimum moisture content (OMC) with different sizes and contents. Also, one dimensional consolidation tests were carried out to evaluate the benefit of utilizing randomly distributed waste plastics fiber to improve the engineering behavior of a tested soils. Silty soil specimens were prepared and tested at five different percentages of plastic waste content (i.e. 0.25%, 0.50%, 0.75%, 1% and 1.25% by weight of the parent soil). The size of plastic chips used, are 4 mm, 8 mm and 12 mm long and 4 mm in width. The results show that with the addition of waste plastic fibers, the MDD and OMC and also the compressibility of soil decrease significantly.