BUILDING MATERIALS CONFERENCE


Building Materials Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Building Materials is a conference track under the Architecture and Urban Planning Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Architecture and Urban Planning.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Architecture and Urban Planning).

Building Materials is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Building Materials Conference Track will be held at “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Paris, France in July 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in New York, United States in August 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2021” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2021” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2021” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2021” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2021” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Paris, France in July 2021” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in New York, United States in August 2021” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2021” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2021” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2021” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2021” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2021” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2021” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2021” - “Architecture and Urban Planning Conference in Paris, France in December 2021” .

Building Materials is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

X. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

XI. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

XII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

XIII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

XIV. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

XV. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVI. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIX. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20AUPC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XX. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline January 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21AUPC02GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XX. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline January 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21AUPC02GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXI. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 16, 2021
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline March 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21AUPC04ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 01, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21AUPC05TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 06, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21AUPC06US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIV. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline June 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21AUPC07FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXV. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2021
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline July 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21AUPC08US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVI. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2021
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21AUPC09JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2021
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21AUPC09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVIII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 22, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21AUPC10ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIX. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21AUPC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXX. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21AUPC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXI. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2021
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21AUPC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2021
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21AUPC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXIII. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline July 14, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline July 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21AUPC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder
FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

V. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

FINISHED

VI. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IX. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

Architecture and Urban Planning Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Building Materials Conference"

  • Environmental Impact of Autoclaved Aerated Concrete in Modern Construction: A Case Study from the New Egyptian Administrative Capital
    Authors: Esraa A. Khalil, Mohamed N. AbouZeid, Keywords: AAC blocks, building material, environmental impact, modern construction, New Egyptian Administrative Capital. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Building materials selection is critical for the sustainability of any project. The choice of building materials has a huge impact on the built environment and cost of projects. Building materials emit huge amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) due to the use of cement as a basic component in the manufacturing process and as a binder, which harms our environment. Energy consumption from buildings has increased in the last few years; a huge amount of energy is being wasted from using unsustainable building and finishing materials, as well as from the process of heating and cooling of buildings. In addition, the construction sector in Egypt is taking a good portion of the economy; however, there is a lack of awareness of buildings environmental impacts on the built environment. Using advanced building materials and different wall systems can help in reducing heat consumption, the project’s initial and long-term costs, and minimizing the environmental impacts. Red Bricks is one of the materials that are being used widely in Egypt. There are many other types of bricks such as Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC); however, the use of Red Bricks is dominating the construction industry due to its affordability and availability. This research focuses on the New Egyptian Administrative Capital as a case study to investigate the potential of the influence of using different wall systems such as AAC on the project’s cost and the environment. The aim of this research is to conduct a comparative analysis between the traditional and most commonly used bricks in Egypt, which is Red Bricks, and AAC wall systems. Through an economic and environmental study, the difference between the two wall systems will be justified to encourage the utilization of uncommon techniques in the construction industry to build more affordable, energy efficient and sustainable buildings. The significance of this research is to show the potential of using AAC in the construction industry and its positive influences. The study analyzes the factors associated with choosing suitable building materials for different projects according to the need and criteria of each project and its nature without harming the environment and wasting materials that could be saved or recycled. The New Egyptian Administrative Capital is considered as the country’s new heart, where ideas regarding energy savings and environmental benefits are taken into consideration. Meaning that, Egypt is taking good steps to move towards more sustainable construction. According to the analysis and site visits, there is a potential in reducing the initial costs of buildings by 12.1% and saving energy by using different techniques up to 25%. Interviews with the mega structures project engineers and managers reveal that they are more open to introducing sustainable building materials that will help in saving the environment and moving towards green construction as well as to studying more effective techniques for energy conservation.
  • An Evaluation of the Feasibility of Several Industrial Wastes and Natural Materials as Precursors for the Production of Alkali Activated Materials
    Authors: O. Alelweet, S. Pavia, Keywords: Reactivity, water demand, alkali-activated materials, brick, bauxite, illitic clay, fly ash, slag. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: In order to face current compelling environmental problems affecting the planet, the construction industry needs to adapt. It is widely acknowledged that there is a need for durable, high-performance, low-greenhouse gas emission binders that can be used as an alternative to Portland cement (PC) to lower the environmental impact of construction. Alkali activated materials (AAMs) are considered a more sustainable alternative to PC materials. The binders of AAMs result from the reaction of an alkali metal source and a silicate powder or precursor which can be a calcium silicate or an aluminosilicate-rich material. This paper evaluates the particle size, specific surface area, chemical and mineral composition and amorphousness of silicate materials (most industrial waste locally produced in Ireland and Saudi Arabia) to develop alkali-activated binders that can replace PC resources in specific applications. These include recycled ceramic brick, bauxite, illitic clay, fly ash and metallurgical slag. According to the results, the wastes are reactive and comply with building standards requirements. The study also evidenced that the reactivity of the Saudi bauxite (with significant kaolinite) can be enhanced on thermal activation; and high calcium in the slag will promote reaction; which should be possible with low alkalinity activators. The wastes evidenced variable water demands that will be taken into account for mixing with the activators. Finally, further research is proposed to further determine the reactive fraction of the clay-based precursors.
  • Performing Diagnosis in Building with Partially Valid Heterogeneous Tests
    Authors: Houda Najeh, Mahendra Pratap Singh, Stéphane Ploix, Antoine Caucheteux, Karim Chabir, Mohamed Naceur Abdelkrim, Keywords: Heterogeneous tests, validity, building system, sensor grids, sensor fault, diagnosis, fault detection and isolation. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Building system is highly vulnerable to different kinds of faults and human misbehaviors. Energy efficiency and user comfort are directly targeted due to abnormalities in building operation. The available fault diagnosis tools and methodologies particularly rely on rules or pure model-based approaches. It is assumed that model or rule-based test could be applied to any situation without taking into account actual testing contexts. Contextual tests with validity domain could reduce a lot of the design of detection tests. The main objective of this paper is to consider fault validity when validate the test model considering the non-modeled events such as occupancy, weather conditions, door and window openings and the integration of the knowledge of the expert on the state of the system. The concept of heterogeneous tests is combined with test validity to generate fault diagnoses. A combination of rules, range and model-based tests known as heterogeneous tests are proposed to reduce the modeling complexity. Calculation of logical diagnoses coming from artificial intelligence provides a global explanation consistent with the test result. An application example shows the efficiency of the proposed technique: an office setting at Grenoble Institute of Technology.
  • Comparative Study of Seismic Isolation as Retrofit Method for Historical Constructions
    Authors: Carlos H. Cuadra, Keywords: Historical building, finite element method, masonry structure, seismic isolation, wooden structure. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Seismic isolation can be used as a retrofit method for historical buildings with the advantage that minimum intervention on super-structure is required. However, selection of isolation devices depends on weight and stiffness of upper structure. In this study, two buildings are considered for analyses to evaluate the applicability of this retrofitting methodology. Both buildings are located at Akita prefecture in the north part of Japan. One building is a wooden structure that corresponds to the old council meeting hall of Noshiro city. The second building is a brick masonry structure that was used as house of a foreign mining engineer and it is located at Ani town. Ambient vibration measurements were performed on both buildings to estimate their dynamic characteristics. Then, target period of vibration of isolated systems is selected as 3 seconds is selected to estimate required stiffness of isolation devices. For wooden structure, which is a light construction, it was found that natural rubber isolators in combination with friction bearings are suitable for seismic isolation. In case of masonry building elastomeric isolator can be used for its seismic isolation. Lumped mass systems are used for seismic response analysis and it is verified in both cases that seismic isolation can be used as retrofitting method of historical construction. However, in the case of the light building, most of the weight corresponds to the reinforced concrete slab that is required to install isolation devices.
  • Architecture Performance-Related Design Based on Graphic Parameterization
    Authors: Wenzhe Li, Xiaoyu Ying, Grace Ding, Keywords: Graphic parameterization, green building design, mathematical model, U-shaped buildings. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Architecture plane form is an important consideration in the design of green buildings due to its significant impact on energy performance. The most effective method to consider energy performance in the early design stages is parametric modelling. This paper presents a methodology to program plane forms using MATLAB language, generating 16 kinds of plane forms by changing four designed parameters. DesignBuilder (an energy consumption simulation software) was proposed to simulate the energy consumption of the generated planes. A regression mathematical model was established to study the relationship between the plane forms and their energy consumption. The main finding of the study suggested that there was a cubic function relationship between the depth-ratio of U-shaped buildings and energy consumption, and there is also a cubic function relationship between the width-ratio and energy consumption. In the design, the depth-ratio of U-shaped buildings should not be less than 2.5, and the width-ratio should not be less than 2.
  • Fire Resilient Cities: The Impact of Fire Regulations, Technological and Community Resilience
    Authors: Fanny Guay, Keywords: Buildings, cities, fire, resilience. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3300584 Abstract: Building resilience, sustainable buildings, urbanization, climate change, resilient cities, are just a few examples of where the focus of research has been in the last few years. It is obvious that there is a need to rethink how we are building our cities and how we are renovating our existing buildings. However, the question remaining is how can we assure that we are building sustainable yet resilient cities? There are many aspects one can touch upon when discussing resilience in cities, but after the event of Grenfell in June 2017, it has become clear that fire resilience must be a priority. We define resilience as a holistic approach including communities, society and systems, focusing not only on resisting the effects of a disaster, but also how it will cope and recover from it. Cities are an example of such a system, where components such as buildings have an important role to play. A building on fire will have an impact on the community, the economy, the environment, and so the entire system. Therefore, we believe that fire and resilience go hand in hand when we discuss building resilient cities. This article aims at discussing the current state of the concept of fire resilience and suggests actions to support the built of more fire resilient buildings. Using the case of Grenfell and the fire safety regulations in the UK, we will briefly compare the fire regulations in other European countries, more precisely France, Germany and Denmark, to underline the difference and make some suggestions to increase fire resilience via regulation. For this research, we will also include other types of resilience such as technological resilience, discussing the structure of buildings itself, as well as community resilience, considering the role of communities in building resilience. Our findings demonstrate that to increase fire resilience, amending existing regulations might be necessary, for example, how we performed reaction to fire tests and how we classify building products. However, as we are looking at national regulations, we are only able to make general suggestions for improvement. Another finding of this research is that the capacity of the community to recover and adapt after a fire is also an essential factor. Fundamentally, fire resilience, technological resilience and community resilience are closely connected. Building resilient cities is not only about sustainable buildings or energy efficiency; it is about assuring that all the aspects of resilience are included when building or renovating buildings. We must ask ourselves questions as: Who are the users of this building? Where is the building located? What are the components of the building, how was it designed and which construction products have been used? If we want to have resilient cities, we must answer these basic questions and assure that basic factors such as fire resilience are included in our assessment.
  • Valorization of the Algerian Plaster and Dune Sand in the Building Sector
    Authors: S. Dorbani, F. Kharchi, F. Salem, K. Arroudj, N. Chioukh, Keywords: Local materials, mortar, plaster, dune sand, compaction, mechanical performance, thermal performance. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3299677 Abstract: The need for thermal comfort of buildings, with the aim of saving energy, has always generated a big interest during the development of methods, to improve the mode of construction. In the present paper, which is concerned by the valorization of locally abundant materials, mixtures of plaster and dune sand have been studied. To point out the thermal performances of these mixtures, a comparative study has been established between this product and the two materials most commonly used in construction, the concrete and hollow brick. The results showed that optimal mixture is made with 1/3 plaster and 2/3 dune sand. This mortar achieved significant increases in the mechanical strengths, which allow it to be used as a carrier element for buildings, of up to two levels. The element obtained offers an acceptable thermal insulation, with a decrease the outer-wall construction thickness.
  • Analyzing Façade Scenarios and Daylight Levels in the Reid Building: A Reflective Case Study on the Designed Daylight under Overcast Sky
    Authors: Eman Mayah, Raid Hanna, Keywords: Daylight levels, educational building, façade fenestration, overcast weather. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3299511 Abstract: This study presents the use of daylight in the case study of the Reid building at the Glasgow School of Art in the city of Glasgow, UK. In Nordic countries, daylight is one of the main considerations within building design, especially in the face of long, lightless winters. A shortage of daylight, contributing to dark and gloomy conditions, necessitates that designs incorporate strong daylight performance. As such, the building in question is designed to capture natural light for varying needs, where studios are located on the North and South façades. The study’s approach presents an analysis of different façade scenarios, where daylight from the North is observed, analyzed and compared with the daylight from the South façade for various design studios in the building. The findings then are correlated with the results of daylight levels from the daylight simulation program (Autodesk Ecotect Analysis) for the investigated studios. The study finds there to be a dramatic difference in daylight nature and levels between the North and South façades, where orientation, obstructions and designed façade fenestrations have major effects on the findings. The study concludes that some of the studios positioned on the North façade do not have a desirable quality of diffused northern light, due to the outside building’s obstructions, area and volume of the studio and the shadow effect of the designed mezzanine floor in the studios.
  • An Approach towards Designing an Energy Efficient Building through Embodied Energy Assessment: A Case of Apartment Building in Composite Climate
    Authors: Ambalika Ekka, Keywords: Energy efficient, embodied energy, energy performance index, building materials. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3298880 Abstract: In today’s world, the growing demand for urban built forms has resulted in the production and consumption of building materials i.e. embodied energy in building construction, leading to pollution and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Therefore, new buildings will offer a unique opportunity to implement more energy efficient building without compromising on building performance of the building. Embodied energy of building materials forms major contribution to embodied energy in buildings. The paper results in an approach towards designing an energy efficient apartment building through embodied energy assessment. This paper discusses the trend of residential development in Rourkela, which includes three case studies of the contemporary houses, followed by architectural elements, number of storeys, predominant material use and plot sizes using primary data. It results in identification of predominant material used and other characteristics in urban area. Further, the embodied energy coefficients of various dominant building materials and alternative materials manufactured in Indian Industry is taken in consideration from secondary source i.e. literature study. The paper analyses the embodied energy by estimating materials and operational energy of proposed building followed by altering the specifications of the materials based on the building components i.e. walls, flooring, windows, insulation and roof through res build India software and comparison of different options is assessed with consideration of sustainable parameters. This paper results that autoclaved aerated concrete block only reaches the energy performance Index benchmark i.e. 69.35 kWh/m2 yr i.e. by saving 4% of operational energy and as embodied energy has no particular index, out of all materials it has the highest EE 23206202.43  MJ.
  • Tokyo Skyscrapers: Technologically Advanced Structures in Seismic Areas
    Authors: J. Szolomicki, H. Golasz-Szolomicka, Keywords: Core structure, damping systems, high-rise buildings. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2643914 Abstract: The architectural and structural analysis of selected high-rise buildings in Tokyo is presented in this paper. The capital of Japan is the most densely populated city in the world and moreover is located in one of the most active seismic zones. The combination of these factors has resulted in the creation of sophisticated designs and innovative engineering solutions, especially in the field of design and construction of high-rise buildings. The foreign architectural studios (as, for Jean Nouvel, Kohn Pedesen Associates, Skidmore, Owings & Merill) which specialize in the designing of skyscrapers, played a major role in the development of technological ideas and architectural forms for such extraordinary engineering structures. Among the projects completed by them, there are examples of high-rise buildings that set precedents for future development. An essential aspect which influences the design of high-rise buildings is the necessity to take into consideration their dynamic reaction to earthquakes and counteracting wind vortices. The need to control motions of these buildings, induced by the force coming from earthquakes and wind, led to the development of various methods and devices for dissipating energy which occur during such phenomena. Currently, Japan is a global leader in seismic technologies which safeguard seismic influence on high-rise structures. Due to these achievements the most modern skyscrapers in Tokyo are able to withstand earthquakes with a magnitude of over seven degrees at the Richter scale. Damping devices applied are of a passive, which do not require additional power supply or active one which suppresses the reaction with the input of extra energy. In recent years also hybrid dampers were used, with an additional active element to improve the efficiency of passive damping.