HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS (HPV) CONFERENCE


Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is a conference track under the Healthcare Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Healthcare.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Healthcare).

Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Conference Track will be held at “Healthcare Conference in New York, United States in October 2019” - “Healthcare Conference in Rome, Italy in December 2019” - “Healthcare Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2020” - “Healthcare Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2020” .

Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 11 - 12, 2019
ROME, ITALY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline August 29, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline September 10, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 12, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 19HC12IT
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 18 - 19, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline August 29, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline September 10, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline January 16, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20HC02GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline August 29, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline September 10, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline March 16, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20HC04ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder
FINISHED

INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

JUNE 26 - 27, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

Healthcare Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Conference"

  • Negative RT-PCR in a Newborn Infected with Zika Virus: A Case Report
    Authors: Vallejo Michael, Acuña Edgar, Roa Juan David, Peñuela Rosa, Parra Alejandra, Casallas Daniela, Rodriguez Sheyla, Keywords: Zika Virus, polymerase chain reaction, microcephaly, amniotic fluid. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3298934 Abstract: Congenital Zika Virus Syndrome is an entity composed by a variety of birth defects presented in newborns that have been exposed to the Zika Virus during pregnancy. The syndrome characteristic features are severe microcephaly, cerebral tissue abnormalities, ophthalmological abnormalities such as uveitis and chorioretinitis, arthrogryposis, clubfoot deformity and muscular tone abnormalities. The confirmatory test is the Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) associated to the physical findings. Here we present the case of a newborn with microcephaly whose mother presented a confirmed Zika Virus infection during the third trimester of pregnancy, despite of the evident findings and the history of Zika infection the RT-PCR in amniotic and cerebrospinal fluid of the newborn was negative. RT-PCR has demonstrated a low sensibility in samples with low viral loads, reason why, we propose a clinical diagnosis in patients with clinical history of Zika Virus infection during pregnancy accompanied by evident clinical manifestations of the child.
  • Automated, Objective Assessment of Pilot Performance in Simulated Environment
    Authors: Maciej Zasuwa, Grzegorz Ptasinski, Antoni Kopyt, Keywords: Automated assessment, flight simulator, human factors, pilot training. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2643561 Abstract: Nowadays flight simulators offer tremendous possibilities for safe and cost-effective pilot training, by utilization of powerful, computational tools. Due to technology outpacing methodology, vast majority of training related work is done by human instructors. It makes assessment not efficient, and vulnerable to instructors’ subjectivity. The research presents an Objective Assessment Tool (gOAT) developed at the Warsaw University of Technology, and tested on SW-4 helicopter flight simulator. The tool uses database of the predefined manoeuvres, defined and integrated to the virtual environment. These were implemented, basing on Aeronautical Design Standard Performance Specification Handling Qualities Requirements for Military Rotorcraft (ADS-33), with predefined Mission-Task-Elements (MTEs). The core element of the gOAT enhanced algorithm that provides instructor a new set of information. In details, a set of objective flight parameters fused with report about psychophysical state of the pilot. While the pilot performs the task, the gOAT system automatically calculates performance using the embedded algorithms, data registered by the simulator software (position, orientation, velocity, etc.), as well as measurements of physiological changes of pilot’s psychophysiological state (temperature, sweating, heart rate). Complete set of measurements is presented on-line to instructor’s station and shown in dedicated graphical interface. The presented tool is based on open source solutions, and flexible for editing. Additional manoeuvres can be easily added using guide developed by authors, and MTEs can be changed by instructor even during an exercise. Algorithm and measurements used allow not only to implement basic stress level measurements, but also to reduce instructor’s workload significantly. Tool developed can be used for training purpose, as well as periodical checks of the aircrew. Flexibility and ease of modifications allow the further development to be wide ranged, and the tool to be customized. Depending on simulation purpose, gOAT can be adjusted to support simulator of aircraft, helicopter, or unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).
  • Unstructured-Data Content Search Based on Optimized EEG Signal Processing and Multi-Objective Feature Extraction
    Authors: Qais M. Yousef, Yasmeen A. Alshaer, Keywords: Artificial intelligence, data contents search, human active memory, mind wave, multi-objective optimization. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1474839 Abstract: Over the last few years, the amount of data available on the globe has been increased rapidly. This came up with the emergence of recent concepts, such as the big data and the Internet of Things, which have furnished a suitable solution for the availability of data all over the world. However, managing this massive amount of data remains a challenge due to their large verity of types and distribution. Therefore, locating the required file particularly from the first trial turned to be a not easy task, due to the large similarities of names for different files distributed on the web. Consequently, the accuracy and speed of search have been negatively affected. This work presents a method using Electroencephalography signals to locate the files based on their contents. Giving the concept of natural mind waves processing, this work analyses the mind wave signals of different people, analyzing them and extracting their most appropriate features using multi-objective metaheuristic algorithm, and then classifying them using artificial neural network to distinguish among files with similar names. The aim of this work is to provide the ability to find the files based on their contents using human thoughts only. Implementing this approach and testing it on real people proved its ability to find the desired files accurately within noticeably shorter time and retrieve them as a first choice for the user.
  • Assessing the Impact of High Fidelity Human Patient Simulation on Teamwork among Nursing, Medicine and Pharmacy Undergraduate Students
    Authors: S. MacDonald, A. Manuel, R. Law, N. Bandruak, A. Dubrowski, V. Curran, J. Smith-Young, K. Simmons, A. Warren, Keywords: Acute anaphylaxis, high fidelity human patient simulation, low fidelity simulation, interprofessional education. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1474329 Abstract: High fidelity human patient simulation has been used for many years by health sciences education programs to foster critical thinking, engage learners, improve confidence, improve communication, and enhance psychomotor skills. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of research on the use of high fidelity human patient simulation to foster teamwork among nursing, medicine and pharmacy undergraduate students. This study compared the impact of high fidelity and low fidelity simulation education on teamwork among nursing, medicine and pharmacy students. For the purpose of this study, two innovative teaching scenarios were developed based on the care of an adult patient experiencing acute anaphylaxis: one high fidelity using a human patient simulator and one low fidelity using case based discussions. A within subjects, pretest-posttest, repeated measures design was used with two-treatment levels and random assignment of individual subjects to teams of two or more professions. A convenience sample of twenty-four (n=24) undergraduate students participated, including: nursing (n=11), medicine (n=9), and pharmacy (n=4). The Interprofessional Teamwork Questionnaire was used to assess for changes in students’ perception of their functionality within the team, importance of interprofessional collaboration, comprehension of roles, and confidence in communication and collaboration. Student satisfaction was also assessed. Students reported significant improvements in their understanding of the importance of interprofessional teamwork and of the roles of nursing and medicine on the team after participation in both the high fidelity and the low fidelity simulation. However, only participants in the high fidelity simulation reported a significant improvement in their ability to function effectively as a member of the team. All students reported that both simulations were a meaningful learning experience and all students would recommend both experiences to other students. These findings suggest there is merit in both high fidelity and low fidelity simulation as a teaching and learning approach to foster teamwork among undergraduate nursing, medicine and pharmacy students. However, participation in high fidelity simulation may provide a more realistic opportunity to practice and function as an effective member of the interprofessional health care team.
  • Estimation of Human Absorbed Dose Using Compartmental Model
    Authors: M. Mousavi-Daramoroudi, H. Yousefnia, F. Abbasi-Davani, S. Zolghadri, Keywords: Compartmental modeling, human absorbed dose, 177Lu-DOTATOC, Syrian rats. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1317236 Abstract: Dosimetry is an indispensable and precious factor in patient treatment planning to minimize the absorbed dose in vital tissues. In this study, compartmental model was used in order to estimate the human absorbed dose of 177Lu-DOTATOC from the biodistribution data in wild type rats. For this purpose, 177Lu-DOTATOC was prepared under optimized conditions and its biodistribution was studied in male Syrian rats up to 168 h. Compartmental model was applied to mathematical description of the drug behaviour in tissue at different times. Dosimetric estimation of the complex was performed using radiation absorbed dose assessment resource (RADAR). The biodistribution data showed high accumulation in the adrenal and pancreas as the major expression sites for somatostatin receptor (SSTR). While kidneys as the major route of excretion receive 0.037 mSv/MBq, pancreas and adrenal also obtain 0.039 and 0.028 mSv/MBq. Due to the usage of this method, the points of accumulated activity data were enhanced, and further information of tissues uptake was collected that it will be followed by high (or improved) precision in dosimetric calculations.
  • Mathematical Description of Functional Motion and Application as a Feeding Mode for General Purpose Assistive Robots
    Authors: Martin Leroux, Sylvain Brisebois, Keywords: Assistive robotics, Automated feeding, Elderly care, Trajectory design, Human-Robot Interaction. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1316464 Abstract: Eating a meal is among the Activities of Daily Living, but it takes a lot of time and effort for people with physical or functional limitations. Dedicated technologies are cumbersome and not portable, while general-purpose assistive robots such as wheelchair-based manipulators are too hard to control for elaborate continuous motion like eating. Eating with such devices has not previously been automated, since there existed no description of a feeding motion for uncontrolled environments. In this paper, we introduce a feeding mode for assistive manipulators, including a mathematical description of trajectories for motions that are difficult to perform manually such as gathering and scooping food at a defined/desired pace. We implement these trajectories in a sequence of movements for a semi-automated feeding mode which can be controlled with a very simple 3-button interface, allowing the user to have control over the feeding pace. Finally, we demonstrate the feeding mode with a JACO robotic arm and compare the eating speed, measured in bites per minute of three eating methods: a healthy person eating unaided, a person with upper limb limitations or disability using JACO with manual control, and a person with limitations using JACO with the feeding mode. We found that the feeding mode allows eating about 5 bites per minute, which should be sufficient to eat a meal under 30min.
  • A Paradigm for Characterization and Checking of a Human Noise Behavior
    Authors: Himanshu Dehra, Keywords: Human brain, noise behavior, noise characterization, noise filters, physiological responses, psychoacoustics. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1131589 Abstract: This paper presents a paradigm for characterization and checking of human noise behavior. The definitions of ‘Noise’ and ‘Noise Behavior’ are devised. The concept of characterization and examining of Noise Behavior is obtained from the proposed paradigm of Psychoacoustics. The measurement of human noise behavior is discussed through definitions of noise sources and noise measurements. The noise sources, noise measurement equations and noise filters are further illustrated through examples. The theory and significance of solar energy acoustics is presented for life and its activities. Human comfort and health are correlated with human brain through physiological responses and noise protection. Examples of heat stress, intense heat, sweating and evaporation are also enumerated.
  • Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy
    Authors: Sharan Badiger, Prema T. Akkasaligar, Deepak Kadeli, Keywords: Autonomic nervous system, autonomic nervous dysfunction, cardiac autonomic dysfunction, human immunodeficiency virus. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1130523 Abstract: Human Immunodeficiency Virus is known to affect almost all organ systems in the body. In addition to central nervous system it also affects the autonomic nervous system. Autonomic nervous dysfunction has been known to severely affect the quality of life in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients. It is known to have caused fatal consequences in late stages of the disease in patients who go in for invasive diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. The aim of this review is to determine the incidence, clinical significance and frequency of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients human immunodeficiency virus infection.
  • MAGNI Dynamics: A Vision-Based Kinematic and Dynamic Upper-Limb Model for Intelligent Robotic Rehabilitation
    Authors: Alexandros Lioulemes, Michail Theofanidis, Varun Kanal, Konstantinos Tsiakas, Maher Abujelala, Chris Collander, William B. Townsend, Angie Boisselle, Fillia Makedon, Keywords: Human-robot interaction, kinect, kinematics, dynamics, haptic control, rehabilitation robotics, artificial intelligence. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1340176 Abstract: This paper presents a home-based robot-rehabilitation instrument, called ”MAGNI Dynamics”, that utilized a vision-based kinematic/dynamic module and an adaptive haptic feedback controller. The system is expected to provide personalized rehabilitation by adjusting its resistive and supportive behavior according to a fuzzy intelligence controller that acts as an inference system, which correlates the user’s performance to different stiffness factors. The vision module uses the Kinect’s skeletal tracking to monitor the user’s effort in an unobtrusive and safe way, by estimating the torque that affects the user’s arm. The system’s torque estimations are justified by capturing electromyographic data from primitive hand motions (Shoulder Abduction and Shoulder Forward Flexion). Moreover, we present and analyze how the Barrett WAM generates a force-field with a haptic controller to support or challenge the users. Experiments show that by shifting the proportional value, that corresponds to different stiffness factors of the haptic path, can potentially help the user to improve his/her motor skills. Finally, potential areas for future research are discussed, that address how a rehabilitation robotic framework may include multisensing data, to improve the user’s recovery process.
  • Developing Models for Predicting Physiologically Impaired Arm Reaching Paths
    Authors: Nina Robson, Kenneth John Faller II, Vishalkumar Ahir, Mustafa Mhawesh, Reza Langari, Keywords: Higher order kinematic specifications, human motor coordination, impaired movement, kinematic synthesis. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1129547 Abstract: This paper describes the development of a model of an impaired human arm performing a reaching motion, which will be used to predict hand path trajectories for people with reduced arm joint mobility. Assuming that the arm was in contact with a surface during the entire movement, the contact conditions at the initial and final task locations were determined and used to generate the entire trajectory. The model was validated by comparing it to experimental data, which simulated an arm joint impairment by physically constraining the joint motion with a brace. Future research will include using the model in the development of physical training protocols that avoid early recruitment of “healthy” Degrees-Of-Freedom (DOF) for reaching motions, thus facilitating an Active Range-Of-Motion Recovery (AROM) for a particular impaired joint.