ENGINEERING HEALTH CONFERENCE


Engineering Health Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Engineering Health is a conference track under the Healthcare Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Healthcare.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Healthcare).

Engineering Health is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Engineering Health Conference Track will be held at “Healthcare Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2020” - “Healthcare Conference in Paris, France in July 2020” - “Healthcare Conference in New York, United States in August 2020” - “Healthcare Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2020” - “Healthcare Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Healthcare Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2020” - “Healthcare Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2020” - “Healthcare Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2020” - “Healthcare Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2020” - “Healthcare Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2020” - “Healthcare Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” - “Healthcare Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2021” - “Healthcare Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2021” - “Healthcare Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2021” - “Healthcare Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2021” - “Healthcare Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2021” - “Healthcare Conference in Paris, France in July 2021” - “Healthcare Conference in New York, United States in August 2021” - “Healthcare Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2021” - “Healthcare Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2021” - “Healthcare Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2021” - “Healthcare Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2021” - “Healthcare Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2021” - “Healthcare Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2021” - “Healthcare Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2021” - “Healthcare Conference in Paris, France in December 2021” .

Engineering Health is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

Final Call

IX. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

X. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

XI. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

XII. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

XIII. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

XIV. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

XV. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20HC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVI. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20HC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVII. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20HC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20HC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIX. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20HC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XX. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline January 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HC02GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XX. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline January 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HC02GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXI. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline March 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HC04ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXII. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 01, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HC05TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIII. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 06, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HC06US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIV. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline June 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HC07FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXV. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2021
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline July 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HC08US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVI. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2021
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HC09JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVII. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2021
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HC09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVIII. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 22, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HC10ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIX. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXX. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXI. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2021
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXII. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2021
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXIII. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21HC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder
FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

II. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

JUNE 26 - 27, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

V. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

FINISHED

VI. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

VII. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

VIII. INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

Healthcare Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Engineering Health Conference"

  • Development of Sports Nation on the Way of Health Management
    Authors: Beatrix Faragó, Zsolt Szakály, Ágnes Kovácsné Tóth, Csaba Konczos, Norbert Kovács, Zsófia Pápai, Tamás Kertész, Keywords: Competitiveness, health behavior, health economy, health management, sports nation. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The future of the nation is the embodiment of a healthy society. A key segment of government policy is the development of health and a health-oriented environment. As a result, sport as an activator of health is an important area for development. In Hungary, sport is a strategic sector with the aim of developing a sports nation. The function of sport in the global society is multifaceted, which is manifested in both social and economic terms. The economic importance of sport is gaining ground in the world, with implications for Central and Eastern Europe. Smaller states, such as Hungary, cannot ignore the economic effects of exploiting the effects of sport. The relationship between physical activity and health is driven by the health economy towards the nation's economic factor. In our research, we analyzed sport as a national strategy sector and its impact on age groups. By presenting the current state of health behavior, we get an idea of the directions where development opportunities require even more intervention. The foundation of the health of a nation is the young age group, whose shaping of health will shape the future generation. Our research was attended by university students from the Faculty of Health and Sports Sciences who will be experts in the field of health in the future. The other group is the elderly, who are a growing social group due to demographic change and are a key segment of the labor market and consumer society. Our study presents the health behavior of the two age groups, their differences, and similarities. The survey also identifies gaps in the development of a health management strategy that national strategies should take into account.
  • Automated Monitoring System to Support Investigation of Contributing Factors of Work-Related Disorders and Accidents
    Authors: Erika R. Chambriard, Sandro C. Izidoro, Davidson P. Mendes, Douglas E. V. Pires, Keywords: Arduino prototyping, occupational health and hygiene, work environment, work-related disorders prevention. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Work-related illnesses and disorders have been a constant aspect of work. Although their nature has changed over time, from musculoskeletal disorders to illnesses related to psychosocial aspects of work, its impact on the life of workers remains significant. Despite significant efforts worldwide to protect workers, the disparity between changes in work legislation and actual benefit for workers’ health has been creating a significant economic burden for social security and health systems around the world. In this context, this study aims to propose, test and validate a modular prototype that allows for work environmental aspects to be assessed, monitored and better controlled. The main focus is also to provide a historical record of working conditions and the means for workers to obtain comprehensible and useful information regarding their work environment and legal limits of occupational exposure to different types of environmental variables, as means to improve prevention of work-related accidents and disorders. We show the developed prototype provides useful and accurate information regarding the work environmental conditions, validating them with standard occupational hygiene equipment. We believe the proposed prototype is a cost-effective and adequate approach to work environment monitoring that could help elucidate the links between work and occupational illnesses, and that different industry sectors, as well as developing countries, could benefit from its capabilities.
  • Effects of Repetitive Strain/Stress Injury on the Human Body
    Authors: Mohd Abdullah, Keywords: Health, wellness, repetitive, chairs. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3593218 Abstract: This review describes some of the effects of repetitive strain/stress injury (RSI) on the human body especially among computer professionals today that spend extended hours of prolonged sitting in front of a computer day in and day out. The review briefly introduces the main factors that contribute to an increase of RSI among such computer professionals. The review briefly discusses how the human spinal column and knees are mainly affected by the onset of RSI resulting in poor posture. The root and secondary causes and effects of RSI are reviewed. The importance and value of the various breathing techniques are reviewed in an attempt to alleviate some of the effects of RSI. The review concludes with a small sample of suggested office stretches and poses geared towards at reducing RSI follows in this review. Readers will learn about the effects of RSI, as well as ways to cope with it. A better understanding of coping strategies may lead to well-being and a healthier overall lifestyle. Ultimately, the investment of time to connect with oneself with the poses and the power of the breath would promote a well-being that is overall healthier thus resulting in a better ability to cope/manage life stresses.
  • Bio-Psycho-Social Consequences and Effects in Fall-Efficacy Scale in Seniors Using Exercise Intervention of Motor Learning According to Yoga Techniques
    Authors: Milada Krejci, Martin Hill, Vaclav Hosek, Dobroslava Jandova, Jiri Kajzar, Pavel Blaha, Keywords: Exercises, balance, seniors 65+, health, mental and social balance. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The paper declares effects of exercise intervention of the research project “Basic research of balance changes in seniors”, granted by the Czech Science Foundation. The objective of the presented study is to define predictors, which influence bio-psycho-social consequences and effects of balance ability in senior 65 years old and above. We focused on the Fall-Efficacy Scale changes evaluation in seniors. Comprehensive hypothesis of the project declares, that motion uncertainty (dyskinesia) can negatively affect the well-being of a senior in bio-psycho-social context. In total, random selection and testing of 100 seniors (30 males, 70 females) from Prague and Central Bohemian region was provided. The sample was divided by stratified random selection into experimental and control groups, who underwent input and output testing. For diagnostics the methods of Medical Anamnesis, Functional anthropological examinations, Tinetti Balance Assessment Tool, SF-36 Health Survey, Anamnestic comparative self-assessment scale were used. Intervention method called "Life in Balance" based on yoga techniques was applied in four-week cycle. Results of multivariate regression were verified by repeated measures ANOVA: subject factor, phase of intervention (between-subject factor), body fluid (within-subject factor) and phase of intervention × body fluid interaction). ANOVA was performed with a repetition involving the factors of subjects, experimental/control group, phase of intervention (independent variable), and x phase interaction followed by Bonferroni multiple comparison assays with a test strength of at least 0.8 on the probability level p < 0.05. In the paper results of the first-year investigation of the three years running project are analysed. Results of balance tests confirmed no significant difference between females and males in pre-test. Significant improvements in balance and walking ability were observed in experimental group in females comparing to males (F = 128.4, p < 0.001). In the females control group, there was no significant change in post- test, while in the female experimental group positive changes in posture and spine flexibility in post-tests were found. It seems that females even in senior age react better to incentives of intervention in balance and spine flexibility. On the base of results analyses, we can declare the significant improvement in social balance markers after intervention in the experimental group (F = 10.5, p < 0.001). In average, seniors are used to take four drugs daily. Number of drugs can contribute to allergy symptoms and balance problems. It can be concluded that static balance and walking ability of seniors according Tinetti Balance scale correlate significantly with psychic and social monitored markers.
  • Sustainability of Healthcare Insurance in India: A Review of Health Insurance Scheme Launched by States in India
    Authors: Mohd Zuhair, Ram Babu Roy, Keywords: Health insurance, out of pocket expenditure, universal healthcare, sustainability. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: This paper presents an overview of the accessibility, design, and functioning of health insurance plans launched by state governments in India. In recent years, the governments of several states in India have come forward to provide health insurance coverage for the low-income group and rural population to reduce the out of pocket expenditure (OPE) on healthcare. Different health insurance schemes have different structures and offerings which differ in the different demographic factors. This study will portray a comparative analysis of the various health insurance schemes by analyzing different offerings and finance generation of the schemes. The comparative analysis will explain the lesson to be learned from these schemes and extend the existing knowledge of the health insurance in India. This would help in recognizing tension between various drivers and identifying issues pertaining to the sustainability of health insurance schemes in India.
  • Evaluation of the Role of Advocacy and the Quality of Care in Reducing Health Inequalities for People with Autism, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals
    Authors: Jonathan Sahu, Jill Aylott, Keywords: Autism, intellectual developmental disabilities, advocacy, health inequalities, quality of care. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Individuals with Autism, Intellectual and Developmental disabilities (AIDD) are one of the most vulnerable groups in society, hampered not only by their own limitations to understand and interact with the wider society, but also societal limitations in perception and understanding. Communication to express their needs and wishes is fundamental to enable such individuals to live and prosper in society. This research project was designed as an organisational case study, in a large secondary health care hospital within the National Health Service (NHS), to assess the quality of care provided to people with AIDD and to review the role of advocacy to reduce health inequalities in these individuals. Methods: The research methodology adopted was as an “insider researcher”. Data collection included both quantitative and qualitative data i.e. a mixed method approach. A semi-structured interview schedule was designed and used to obtain qualitative and quantitative primary data from a wide range of interdisciplinary frontline health care workers to assess their understanding and awareness of systems, processes and evidence based practice to offer a quality service to people with AIDD. Secondary data were obtained from sources within the organisation, in keeping with “Case Study” as a primary method, and organisational performance data were then compared against national benchmarking standards. Further data sources were accessed to help evaluate the effectiveness of different types of advocacy that were present in the organisation. This was gauged by measures of user and carer experience in the form of retrospective survey analysis, incidents and complaints. Results: Secondary data demonstrate near compliance of the Organisation with the current national benchmarking standard (Monitor Compliance Framework). However, primary data demonstrate poor knowledge of the Mental Capacity Act 2005, poor knowledge of organisational systems, processes and evidence based practice applied for people with AIDD. In addition there was poor knowledge and awareness of frontline health care workers of advocacy and advocacy schemes for this group. Conclusions: A significant amount of work needs to be undertaken to improve the quality of care delivered to individuals with AIDD. An operational strategy promoting the widespread dissemination of information may not be the best approach to deliver quality care and optimal patient experience and patient advocacy. In addition, a more robust set of standards, with appropriate metrics, needs to be developed to assess organisational performance which will stand the test of professional and public scrutiny.
  • Classification of Health Risk Factors to Predict the Risk of Falling in Older Adults
    Authors: L. Lindsay, S. A. Coleman, D. Kerr, B. J. Taylor, A. Moorhead, Keywords: Classification, falls, health risk factors, machine learning, older adults. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3299623 Abstract: Cognitive decline and frailty is apparent in older adults leading to an increased likelihood of the risk of falling. Currently health care professionals have to make professional decisions regarding such risks, and hence make difficult decisions regarding the future welfare of the ageing population. This study uses health data from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA), focusing on adults over the age of 50 years, in order to analyse health risk factors and predict the likelihood of falls. This prediction is based on the use of machine learning algorithms whereby health risk factors are used as inputs to predict the likelihood of falling. Initial results show that health risk factors such as long-term health issues contribute to the number of falls. The identification of such health risk factors has the potential to inform health and social care professionals, older people and their family members in order to mitigate daily living risks.
  • The Effect on the Smoking and Health Behavior of Wellness of Students Who Are Learned in the University of Health Sciences
    Authors: Serife Zehra Altunkurek, Kezban Kaya, Keywords: Healthcare students, lifestyle-related behavior, wellness, smoking DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2706638 Abstract: Objective: To evaluate healthcare students’ wellness and to determine the relationship between wellness and other lifestyle-related behaviors including diet, exercise, sleep, stress, and tobacco and alcohol consumption. Material and Method: This descriptive cross-sectional study surveyed 984 students at the University of Health Sciences in Ankara, Turkey. Data were collected using a questionnaire that included questions on sociodemographic characteristics and a Turkish version of an established health and wellness measure. Results: The data revealed that 17.8% of the students smoke. There was no statistically significant difference between the participants' wellness scores and their smoking status. However, the student’s wellness was significantly associated with physical activity (p < 0.001), which, overall, was deemed as insufficient in this population. Statistically significant associations were also identified between participants’ wellness and their ability to cope with stress and regular sleep (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Healthcare students do not engage in sufficient physical activity and that this affects their overall wellness. Therefore, academic institutions should provide more opportunities for students to exert themselves physically through a diversity of inclusive activities. Such efforts, in addition to promoting healthy sleep and stress-coping practices, will greatly benefit students’ short- and long-term health and wellness.
  • Comparing the Educational Effectiveness of eHealth to Deliver Health Knowledge between Higher Literacy Users and Lower Literacy Users
    Authors: Yah-Ling Hung, Keywords: eHealth, health intervention, health literacy, usability evaluation. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2643925 Abstract: eHealth is undoubtedly emerging as a promising vehicle to provide information for individual self-care management. However, the accessing ability, reading strategies and navigating behavior between higher literacy users and lower literacy users are significantly different. Yet, ways to tailor audiences’ health literacy and develop appropriate eHealth to feed their need become a big challenge. The purpose of this study is to compare the educational effectiveness of eHealth to deliver health knowledge between higher literacy users and lower literacy users, thus establishing useful design strategies of eHealth for users with different level of health literacy. The study was implemented in four stages, the first of which developed a website as the testing media to introduce health care knowledge relating to children’s allergy. Secondly, a reliability and validity test was conducted to make sure that all of the questions in the questionnaire were good indicators. Thirdly, a pre-post knowledge test was conducted with 66 participants, 33 users with higher literacy and 33 users with lower literacy respectively. Finally, a usability evaluation survey was undertaken to explore the criteria used by users with different levels of health literacy to evaluate eHealth. The results demonstrated that the eHealth Intervention in both groups had a positive outcome. There was no significant difference between the effectiveness of eHealth intervention between users with higher literacy and users with lower literacy. However, the average mean of lower literacy group was marginally higher than the average mean of higher literacy group. The findings also showed that the criteria used to evaluate eHealth could be analyzed in terms of the quality of information, appearance, appeal and interaction, but the users with lower literacy have different evaluation criteria from those with higher literacy. This is an interdisciplinary research which proposes the sequential key steps that incorporate the planning, developing and accessing issues that need to be considered when designing eHealth for patients with varying degrees of health literacy.
  • Exploring the Applicability of a Rapid Health Assessment in India
    Authors: Claudia Carbajal, Jija Dutt, Smriti Pahwa, Sumukhi Vaid, Karishma Vats, Keywords: Citizen-led assessment, infant and young children feeding, maternal nutrition, rapid health assessment supplementation, water and sanitation. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2643693 Abstract: ASER Centre, the research and assessment arm of Pratham Education Foundation sees measurement as the first stage of action. ASER uses primary research to push and give empirical foundations to policy discussions at a multitude of levels. At a household level, common citizens use a simple assessment (a floor-level test) to measure learning across rural India. This paper presents the evidence on the applicability of an ASER approach to the health sector. A citizen-led assessment was designed and executed that collected information from young mothers with children up to a year of age. The pilot assessments were rolled-out in two different models: Paid surveyors and student volunteers. The survey covered three geographic areas: 1,239 children in the Jaipur District of Rajasthan, 2,086 in the Rae Bareli District of Uttar Pradesh, and 593 children in the Bhuj Block in Gujarat. The survey tool was designed to study knowledge of health-related issues, daily practices followed by young mothers and access to relevant services and programs. It provides insights on behaviors related to infant and young child feeding practices, child and maternal nutrition and supplementation, water and sanitation, and health services. Moreover, the survey studies the reasons behind behaviors giving policy-makers actionable pathways to improve implementation of social sector programs. Although data on health outcomes are available, this approach could provide a rapid annual assessment of health issues with indicators that are easy to understand and act upon so that measurements do not become an exclusive domain of experts. The results give many insights into early childhood health behaviors and challenges. Around 98% of children are breastfed, and approximately half are not exclusively breastfed (for the first 6 months). Government established diet diversity guidelines are met for less than 1 out of 10 children. Although most households are satisfied with the quality of drinking water, most tested households had contaminated water.