NURSING OUTCOME STUDY CONFERENCE


Nursing Outcome Study Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Nursing Outcome Study is a conference track under the Nursing Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Nursing.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Nursing).

Nursing Outcome Study is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Nursing Outcome Study Conference Track will be held at “Nursing Conference in Rome, Italy in December 2019” - “Nursing Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2020” - “Nursing Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Paris, France in July 2020” - “Nursing Conference in New York, United States in August 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2020” - “Nursing Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” .

Nursing Outcome Study is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

V. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

VI. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

VII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

VIII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 01, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC05TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

IX. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

JUNE 04 - 05, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 06, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC06US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

X. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline June 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC07FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XI. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline July 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC08US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC09JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 17 - 18, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIV. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 22 - 23, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 22, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC10ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XV. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVI. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 05 - 06, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 17 - 18, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIX. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder
FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

II. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

JUNE 26 - 27, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

Previously Published Papers on "Nursing Outcome Study Conference"

  • Investigation of the Medical Malpractice Tendency of Student Nurses
    Authors: Serap Torun, Osman Bilgin, Ceylan Bıçkıcı, Keywords: nursing student, medical malpractice, nursing, tendency, patient safety DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3454951 Abstract: Introduction: Medical malpractice can be defined as health workers neglecting the expected standard or intentionally not implementing it, doing it wrong and/or incomplete, not being able to implement the accurate practice due to personal or systemic reasons despite desiring to do it correctly and the condition that causes permanent or temporary damage to the patient as a result. If the training periods in which health workers improve their knowledge and skills are passed efficiently, they are expected to have a low rate of error in their professional lives. Aim: Aim of the study is to determine the medical malpractice tendencies of students studying in nursing department. Material and Methods: This descriptive research has been performed with 454 students who study in 3rd and 4th years in the Nursing Department of the Faculty of Health Sciences in a state university in normal and evening education and go out for clinical practice during the 2017-2018 academic year. The sample consisted of 454 students who agreed to participate in the study. Ethics committee approval, the permission of the institution and the verbal consent of the participants were obtained. In collection of data, ‘Personal Information Form’ developed by the researchers and the Malpractice Tendency Scale (SMT) were used. The data were analyzed using SPSS 20 package program. 0.05 was used as the level of significance. Results: The Cronbach’s alpha internal consistency coefficient of the scale was 0.94 and the total mean value of the scale was 211.69 ± 22.14. The mean age of the participants was 22,08 ± 1,852 years; 165 (36,4%) were male and 288 (63,6%) were female. Their mean General Point Average (GPA) was 2.65 ± 0.454 (min 1.03 - max 3.90). Students' average duration of self study per week was 2.89 ± 3.81 (min 0 - max 30) hours. The mean score (80.73) of the 4th year students in the sub-dimension of Drug and Transfusion Applications was significantly higher than the mean score (79.20) of 3rd year students (p < 0.05). The mean score (81.01) of the Drug and Transfusion Applications sub-dimension of those who willingly chose the profession was higher than the mean score (78.88) of those who chose the profession unwillingly. The mean average score (21.48) of Fallings sub-dimension of students who cared for 3 to 4 patients per day was lower than the mean score (22.41) of those who cared for 5 patients and over daily on average (p < 0.05). Conclusion: As a result of this study, it was concluded that malpractice tendency of nursing students was low, and an inverse relationship was found between the duration of education and malpractice tendency.
  • Israeli Households Caring for Children and Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: An Explorative Study
    Authors: Ayelet Gur, Keywords: Disability policy, family policy, intellectual and developmental disabilities, Israel, households study, parents of children with disabilities. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Background: In recent years we are witnessing a welcome trend in which more children/persons with disabilities are living at home with their families and within their communities. This trend is related to various policy innovations as the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities that reflect a shift from the medical-institutional model to a human rights approach. We also witness the emergence of family centered approaches that perceive the family and not just the individual with the disability as a worthy target of policy planning, implementation and evaluation efforts. The current investigation aims to explore economic, psychological and social factors among households of families of children or adults with intellectual disabilities in Israel and to present policy recommendation. Methods: A national sample of 301 households was recruited through the education and employment settings of persons with intellectual disability. The main caregiver of the person with the disability (a parent) was interviewed. Measurements included the income and expense surveys; assets and debts questionnaire; the questionnaire on resources and stress; the social involvement questionnaire and Personal Wellbeing Index. Results: Findings indicate significant gaps in financial circumstances between households of families of children with intellectual disabilities and households of the general Israeli society. Households of families of children with intellectual disabilities report lower income and higher expenditures and loans than the general society. They experience difficulties in saving and coping with unexpected expenses. Caregivers (the parents) experience high stress, low social participation, low financial support from family, friend and non-governmental organizations and decreased well-being. They are highly dependent on social security allowances which constituted 40% of the household's income. Conclusions: Households' dependency on social security allowances may seem contradictory to the encouragement of persons with intellectual disabilities to favor independent living in light of the human rights approach to disability. New policy should aim at reducing caregivers' stress and enhance their social participation and support, with special emphasis on families of lower socio-economic status. Finally, there is a need to continue monitoring the economic and psycho-social needs of households of families of children with intellectual disabilities and other developmental disabilities.
  • Work-Related Shoulder Lesions and Labor Lawsuits in Brazil: Cross-Sectional Study on Worker Health Actions Developed by Employers
    Authors: Reinaldo Biscaro, Luciano R. Ferreira, Leonardo C. Biscaro, Raphael C. Biscaro, Isabela S. Vasconcelos, Laura C. R. Ferreira, Cristiano M. Galhardi, Erica P. Baciuk, Keywords: Work-related accidents, cross-sectional study, shoulder lesions, labor lawsuits. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2571912 Abstract: Introduction: The present study had the objective to present the profile of workers with shoulder disorders related to labor lawsuits in Brazil. The study analyzed the association between the worker’s health and the actions performed by the companies related to injured professional. The research method performed a retrospective, cross-sectional and quantitative database analysis. The documents of labor lawsuits with shoulder injury registered at the Regional Labor Court in the 15th region (Campinas - São Paulo) were submitted to the medical examination and evaluated during the period from 2012 until 2015. The data collected were age, gender, onset of symptoms, length of service, current occupation, type of shoulder injury, referred complaints, type of acromion, associated or related diseases, company actions as CAT (workplace accident communication), compliance of NR7 by the organization (Environmental Risk Prevention Program - PPRA and Medical Coordination Program in Occupational Health - PCMSO). Results: From the 93 workers evaluated, there was a prevalence of men (58.1%), with a mean age of 42.6 y-o, and 54.8% were included in the age group 35-49 years. Regarding the length of work time in the company, 66.7% have worked for more than 5 years. There was an association between gender and current occupational status (p < 0.005), with predominance of women in household occupation (13 vs. 2) and predominance of unemployed men in job search situation (24 vs. 10) and reintegrated to work by judicial decision (8 vs. 2). There was also a correlation between pain and functional limitation (p < 0.01). There was a positive association of PPRA with the complaint of functional limitation and negative association with pain (p < 0.04). There was also a correlation between the sedentary lifestyle and the presence of PCMSO and PPRA (p < 0.04), and the absence of CAT in the companies (p < 0.001). It was concluded that the appearance or aggravation of osseous and articular shoulder pathologies in workers who have undertaken labor law suits seem to be associated with individual habits or inadequate labor practices. These data can help preventing the occurrence of these lesions by implementing local health promotion policies at work.
  • Evidence Based Practice for Oral Care in Children
    Authors: T. Turan, Ç. Erdoğan, Keywords: Children, evidence based practice, nursing, oral care. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2021897 Abstract: As far as is known, general nursing care practices do not include specific evidence-based practices related to oral care in children. This study aimed to evaluate the evidence based nursing practice for oral care in children. This article is planned as a review article by searching the literature in this field. According to all age groups and the oral care in various specific situations located evidence in the literature were examined. It has been determined that the methods and frequency used in oral care practices performed by nurses in clinics differ from one hospital to another. In addition, it is seen that different solutions are used in basic oral care, oral care practices to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia and evidence-based practice in mucositis management in children. As a result, a standard should be established in oral care practices for children and education for children is recommended.
  • An Alternative and Complementary Medicine Method in Vulnerable Pediatric Cancer Patients: Yoga
    Authors: Ç. Erdoğan, T. Turan, Keywords: Cancer treatment, children, nursing, yoga. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1340595 Abstract: Pediatric cancer patients experience multiple distressing, challenges, physical symptom such as fatigue, pain, sleep disturbance, and balance impairment that continue years after treatment completion. In recent years, yoga is often used in children with cancer to cope with these symptoms. Yoga practice is defined as a unique physical activity that combines physical practice, breath work and mindfulness/meditation. Yoga is an increasingly popular mind-body practice also characterized as a mindfulness mode of exercise. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of yoga intervention of children with cancer. This article planned searching the literature in this field. It has been determined that individualized yoga is feasible and provides benefits for inpatient children, improves health-related quality of life, physical activity levels, physical fitness. After yoga program, children anxiety score decreases significantly. Additionally, individualized yoga is feasible for inpatient children receiving intensive chemotherapy. As a result, yoga is an alternative and complementary medicine that can be safely used in children with cancer.
  • A Review on the Importance of Nursing Approaches in Nutrition of Children with Cancer
    Authors: Ş. Çiftcioğlu, E. Efe, Keywords: Cancer treatment, children, complication, nutrition, nursing approaches. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1132381 Abstract: In recent years, cancer has been at the top of diseases that cause death in children. Adequate and balanced nutrition plays an important role in the treatment of cancer. Cancer and cancer treatment is affecting food intake, absorption and metabolism, causing nutritional disorders. Appropriate nutrition is very important for the cancerous child to feel well before, during and after the treatment. There are various difficulties in feeding children with cancer. These are the cancer-related factors. Other factors are environmental and behavioral. As health professionals who spend more time with children in the hospital, nurses should be able to support the children on nutrition and help them to have balanced nutrition. This study aimed to evaluate the importance of nursing approaches in the nutrition of children with cancer. This article is planned as a review article by searching the literature on this field. Anorexia may develop due to psychogenic causes or chemotherapeutic agents or accompanying infections and nutrient uptake may be reduced.  In addition, stomatitis, mucositis, taste and odor changes in the mouth, the feeling of nausea, vomiting and diarrhea can also reduce oral intake and result in significant losses in the energy deficit. In assessing the nutritional status of children with cancer, determining weight loss and good nutrition is essential anamnesis of a child.  Some anthropometric measurements and biochemical tests should be used to evaluate the nutrition of the child. The nutritional status of pediatric cancer patients has been studied for a long time and malnutrition, in particular under nutrition, in this population has long been recognized. Yet, its management remains variable with many malnourished children going unrecognized and consequently untreated. Nutritional support is important to pediatric cancer patients and should be integrated into the overall treatment of these children.
  • Assessment of the Situation and the Cause of Junk Food Consumption in Iranians: A Qualitative Study
    Authors: A. Rezazadeh, B Damari, S. Riazi-Esfahani, M. Hajian, Keywords: Junk foods, situation, qualitative study, Iran. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1132276 Abstract: The consumption of junk food in Iran is alarmingly increasing. This study aimed to investigate the influencing factors of junk food consumption and amendable interventions that are criticized and approved by stakeholders, in order to presented to health policy makers. The articles and documents related to the content of study were collected by using the appropriate key words such as junk food, carbonated beverage, chocolate, candy, sweets, industrial fruit juices, potato chips, French fries, puffed corn, cakes, biscuits, sandwiches, prepared foods and popsicles, ice cream, bar, chewing gum, pastilles and snack, in scholar.google.com, pubmed.com, eric.ed.gov, cochrane.org, magiran.com, medlib.ir, irandoc.ac.ir, who.int, iranmedex.com, sid.ir, pubmed.org and sciencedirect.com databases. The main key points were extracted and included in a checklist and qualitatively analyzed. Then a summarized abstract was prepared in a format of a questionnaire to be presented to stakeholders. The design of this was qualitative (Delphi). According to this method, a questionnaire was prepared based on reviewing the articles and documents and it was emailed to stakeholders, who were asked to prioritize and choose the main problems and effective interventions. After three rounds, consensus was obtained.            Studies revealed high consumption of junk foods in the Iranian population, especially in children and adolescents. The most important affecting factors include availability, low price, media advertisements, preference of fast foods taste, the variety of the packages and their attractiveness, low awareness and changing in lifestyle. Main interventions recommended by stakeholders include developing a protective environment, educational interventions, increasing healthy food access and controlling media advertisements and putting pressure from the Industry and Mining Ministry on producers to produce healthy snacks. According to the findings, the results of this study may be proposed to public health policymakers as an advocacy paper and to be integrated in the interventional programs of Health and Education ministries and the media. Also, implementation of supportive meetings with the producers of alternative healthy products is suggested.
  • Evaluation of the Effect of Nursing Services Provided in a Correctional Institution on the Physical Health Levels and Health Behaviors of Female Inmates
    Authors: Şenay Pehli̇van, Gülümser Kublay, Keywords: Correctional institution, correctional nursing, prison nursing, female inmates, physical health problems, health behaviors. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1132008 Abstract: Female inmates placed in a Correctional Institution (CI) have more physical health problems than other women and their male counterparts. Thus, they require more health care services in the CI and nursing services in particular. CI nurses also have the opportunity to teach behaviors which will protect and improve their health to these women who are difficult to reach in the community. The aim of this study was to evaluate effect of nursing services provided in a CI on the physical health levels and health behaviors of female inmates. The study has a quasi-experimental design. The study was done in Female Closed CI in Ankara, Turkey. The study was conducted on 30 female inmates. Before the implementation of nursing interventions in the initial phase of the study, female inmates were evaluated in terms of physical health problems and health behavior using forms, a physical examination, medical history, health files (file containing medical information related to prisons) and the Omaha System (OS). Findings obtained from evaluations were grouped and symptoms-findings were expressed with OS diagnosis codes. Knowledge, behavior and status scores of prisoners in relation to health problems were determined. After the implementation of the nursing interventions, female inmates were evaluated in terms of physical health problems and health behavior using OS. The research data were collected using the Female Evaluation Form developed by the researcher and the OS. It was found that knowledge, behavior and status scores of prisoners significantly increased after the implementation of nursing interventions (p < 0.05).
  • Comparison of Statins Dose Intensity on HbA1c Control in Outpatients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Prospective Cohort Study
    Authors: Mohamed A. Hammad, Dzul Azri Mohamed Noor, Syed Azhar Syed Sulaiman, Ahmed A. Khamis, Abeer Kharshid, Nor Azizah Aziz, Keywords: Cohort study, diabetes control, dose intensity, HbA1c, Malaysia, statin, Type 2 diabetes mellitus, uncontrolled glycemia. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1131681 Abstract: The effect of statins dose intensity (SDI) on glycemic control in patients with existing diabetes is unclear. Also, there are many contradictory findings were reported in the literature; thus, it is limiting the possibility to draw conclusions. This project was designed to compare the effect of SDI on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c%) control in outpatients with Type 2 diabetes in the endocrine clinic at Hospital Pulau Pinang, Malaysia, between July 2015 and August 2016. A prospective cohort study was conducted, where records of 345 patients with Type 2 diabetes (Moderate-SDI group 289 patients and high-SDI cohort 56 patients) were reviewed to identify demographics and laboratory tests. The target of glycemic control (HbA1c < 7% for patient < 65 years, and < 8% for patient ≥ 65 years) was estimated, and the results were presented as descriptive statistics. From 289 moderate-SDI cohorts with a mean age of 57.3 ± 12.4 years, only 86 (29.8%) cases were shown to have controlled glycemia, while there were 203 (70.2%) cases with uncontrolled glycemia with confidence interval (CI) of 95% (6.2–10.8). On the other hand, the high-SDI group of 56 patients with Type 2 diabetes with a mean age 57.7±12.4 years is distributed among 11 (19.6%) patients with controlled diabetes, and 45 (80.4%) of them had uncontrolled glycemia, CI: 95% (7.1–11.9). The study has demonstrated that the relative risk (RR) of uncontrolled glycemia in patients with Type 2 diabetes that used high-SDI is 1.15, and the excessive relative risk (ERR) is 15%. The absolute risk (AR) is 10.2%, and the number needed to harm (NNH) is 10. Outpatients with Type 2 diabetes who use high-SDI of statin have a higher risk of uncontrolled glycemia than outpatients who had been treated with a moderate-SDI.
  • Visual and Clinical Outcome in Patients with Corneal Lacerations
    Authors: Avantika Verma, Keywords: Cornea, laceration, visual outcome, wound repair. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1340324 Abstract: In industrialized nations, corneal lacerations are one of the most common reason for hospitalization. This study was designed to study visual and clinical outcome in patients presenting with full thickness corneal lacerations in Indian population and to ascertain the impact of various preoperative and operative factors influencing prognosis after repair of corneal lacerations. Males in third decade with injuries at work with metallic objects were common. Lens damage, hyphema, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment and endophthalmitis were seen. All the patients underwent primary repair within first 24 hours of presentation. At 3 months, 74.3% had a good visual outcome. About 5.7% of patients had no perception of light.In conclusion, various demographic and preoperative factors like age, time of presentation, vision at presentation, length of corneal wound, involvement of visual axis, associated ocular features like hyphaema, lenticular changes, vitreous haemorrhage and retinal detachment are significant prognostic indicators for final visual outcome.