MULTI-PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE CONFERENCE


Multi-Professional Practice Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Multi-Professional Practice is a conference track under the Nursing Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Nursing.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Nursing).

Multi-Professional Practice is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Multi-Professional Practice Conference Track will be held at “Nursing Conference in Rome, Italy in December 2019” - “Nursing Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2020” - “Nursing Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Paris, France in July 2020” - “Nursing Conference in New York, United States in August 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2020” - “Nursing Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” .

Multi-Professional Practice is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

V. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

VI. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

VII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

VIII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 01, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC05TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

IX. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

JUNE 04 - 05, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 06, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC06US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

X. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline June 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC07FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XI. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline July 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC08US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC09JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 17 - 18, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIV. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 22 - 23, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 22, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC10ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XV. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVI. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 05 - 06, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 17 - 18, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIX. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline October 31, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline November 15, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder
FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

II. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

JUNE 26 - 27, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

Previously Published Papers on "Multi-Professional Practice Conference"

  • Investigation of the Medical Malpractice Tendency of Student Nurses
    Authors: Serap Torun, Osman Bilgin, Ceylan Bıçkıcı, Keywords: nursing student, medical malpractice, nursing, tendency, patient safety DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3454951 Abstract: Introduction: Medical malpractice can be defined as health workers neglecting the expected standard or intentionally not implementing it, doing it wrong and/or incomplete, not being able to implement the accurate practice due to personal or systemic reasons despite desiring to do it correctly and the condition that causes permanent or temporary damage to the patient as a result. If the training periods in which health workers improve their knowledge and skills are passed efficiently, they are expected to have a low rate of error in their professional lives. Aim: Aim of the study is to determine the medical malpractice tendencies of students studying in nursing department. Material and Methods: This descriptive research has been performed with 454 students who study in 3rd and 4th years in the Nursing Department of the Faculty of Health Sciences in a state university in normal and evening education and go out for clinical practice during the 2017-2018 academic year. The sample consisted of 454 students who agreed to participate in the study. Ethics committee approval, the permission of the institution and the verbal consent of the participants were obtained. In collection of data, ‘Personal Information Form’ developed by the researchers and the Malpractice Tendency Scale (SMT) were used. The data were analyzed using SPSS 20 package program. 0.05 was used as the level of significance. Results: The Cronbach’s alpha internal consistency coefficient of the scale was 0.94 and the total mean value of the scale was 211.69 ± 22.14. The mean age of the participants was 22,08 ± 1,852 years; 165 (36,4%) were male and 288 (63,6%) were female. Their mean General Point Average (GPA) was 2.65 ± 0.454 (min 1.03 - max 3.90). Students' average duration of self study per week was 2.89 ± 3.81 (min 0 - max 30) hours. The mean score (80.73) of the 4th year students in the sub-dimension of Drug and Transfusion Applications was significantly higher than the mean score (79.20) of 3rd year students (p < 0.05). The mean score (81.01) of the Drug and Transfusion Applications sub-dimension of those who willingly chose the profession was higher than the mean score (78.88) of those who chose the profession unwillingly. The mean average score (21.48) of Fallings sub-dimension of students who cared for 3 to 4 patients per day was lower than the mean score (22.41) of those who cared for 5 patients and over daily on average (p < 0.05). Conclusion: As a result of this study, it was concluded that malpractice tendency of nursing students was low, and an inverse relationship was found between the duration of education and malpractice tendency.
  • The Current Home Hemodialysis Practices and Patients’ Safety Related Factors: A Case Study from Germany
    Authors: Ilyas Khan. Liliane Pintelon, Harry Martin, Michael Shömig, Keywords: Home hemodialysis, home hemodialysis practices, patients’ related risks in the current home hemodialysis practices, patient safety in home hemodialysis. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3298739 Abstract: The increasing costs of healthcare on one hand, and the rise in aging population and associated chronic disease, on the other hand, are putting increasing burden on the current health care system in many Western countries. For instance, chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common disease and in Europe, the cost of renal replacement therapy (RRT) is very significant to the total health care cost. However, the recent advancement in healthcare technology, provide the opportunity to treat patients at home in their own comfort. It is evident that home healthcare offers numerous advantages apparently, low costs and high patients’ quality of life. Despite these advantages, the intake of home hemodialysis (HHD) therapy is still low in particular in Germany. Many factors are accounted for the low number of HHD intake. However, this paper is focusing on patients’ safety-related factors of current HHD practices in Germany. The aim of this paper is to analyze the current HHD practices in Germany and to identify risks related factors if any exist. A case study has been conducted in a dialysis center which consists of four dialysis centers in the south of Germany. In total, these dialysis centers have 350 chronic dialysis patients, of which, four patients are on HHD. The centers have 126 staff which includes six nephrologists and 120 other staff i.e. nurses and administration. The results of the study revealed several risk-related factors. Most importantly, these centers do not offer allied health services at the pre-dialysis stage, the HHD training did not have an established curriculum; however, they have just recently developed the first version. Only a soft copy of the machine manual is offered to patients. Surprisingly, the management was not aware of any standard available for home assessment and installation. The home assessment is done by a third party (i.e. the machines and equipment provider) and they may not consider the hygienic quality of the patient’s home. The type of machine provided to patients at home is similar to the one in the center. The model may not be suitable at home because of its size and complexity. Even though portable hemodialysis machines, which are specially designed for home use, are available in the market such as the NxStage series. Besides the type of machine, no assistance is offered for space management at home in particular for placing the machine. Moreover, the centers do not offer remote assistance to patients and their carer at home. However, telephonic assistance is available. Furthermore, no alternative is offered if a carer is not available. In addition, the centers are lacking medical staff including nephrologists and renal nurses.
  • Evidence Based Practice for Oral Care in Children
    Authors: T. Turan, Ç. Erdoğan, Keywords: Children, evidence based practice, nursing, oral care. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2021897 Abstract: As far as is known, general nursing care practices do not include specific evidence-based practices related to oral care in children. This study aimed to evaluate the evidence based nursing practice for oral care in children. This article is planned as a review article by searching the literature in this field. According to all age groups and the oral care in various specific situations located evidence in the literature were examined. It has been determined that the methods and frequency used in oral care practices performed by nurses in clinics differ from one hospital to another. In addition, it is seen that different solutions are used in basic oral care, oral care practices to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia and evidence-based practice in mucositis management in children. As a result, a standard should be established in oral care practices for children and education for children is recommended.
  • Patient Support Program in Pharmacovigilance: Foster Patient Confidence and Compliance
    Authors: Atul Khurana, Rajul Rastogi, Hans-Joachim Gamperl, Keywords: Drug safety, good pharmacovigilance practice, patient support program, pharmacovigilance. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1129762 Abstract: The pharmaceutical companies are getting more inclined towards patient support programs (PSPs) which assist patients and/or healthcare professionals (HCPs) in more desirable disease management and cost-effective treatment. The utmost objective of these programs is patient care. The PSPs may include financial assistance to patients, medicine compliance programs, access to HCPs via phone or online chat centers, etc. The PSP has a crucial role in terms of customer acquisition and retention strategies. During the conduct of these programs, Marketing Authorisation Holder (MAH) may receive information related to concerned medicinal products, which is usually reported by patients or involved HCPs. This information may include suspected adverse reaction(s) during/after administration of medicinal products. Hence, the MAH should design PSP to comply with regulatory reporting requirements and avoid non-compliance during PV inspection. The emergence of wireless health devices is lowering the burden on patients to manually incorporate safety data, and building a significant option for patients to observe major swings in reference to drug safety. Therefore, to enhance the adoption of these programs, MAH not only needs to aware patients about advantages of the program, but also recognizes the importance of time of patients and commitments made in a constructive manner. It is indispensable that strengthening the public health is considered as the topmost priority in such programs, and the MAH is compliant to Pharmacovigilance (PV) requirements along with regulatory obligations.
  • Use of Smartphone in Practical Classes to Facilitate Teaching and Learning of Microscopic Analysis and Interpretation of Tissues Sections
    Authors: Lise P. Labéjof, Krisnayne S. Ribeiro, Jackson A. Santos, Nicolle P. dos Santos, Keywords: Cell phone, digital micrographs, learning of sciences, teaching practices. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1109818 Abstract: An unrecorded experiment of use of the smartphone as a tool for practical classes of histology is presented in this paper. Behavior and learning of students of science courses at the University were analyzed and compared as well as the mode of teaching of this discipline and the appreciation of the students, using either digital photographs taken by phone or drawings for record microscopic observations, analyze and interpret histological sections of human or animal tissues.
  • Predicting Dietary Practice Behavior among Type 2 Diabetics Using the Theory of Planned Behavior and Mixed Methods Design
    Authors: D.O. Omondi, M.K. Walingo, G.M. Mbagaya, L.O.A. Othuon, Keywords: Dietary practice, Kenya, Theory of PlannedBehavior, Type 2 diabetes, Mixed Methods Design. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1060745 Abstract: This study applied the Theory of Planned Behavior model in predicting dietary behavior among Type 2 diabetics in a Kenyan environment. The study was conducted for three months within the diabetic clinic at Kisii Hospital in Nyanza Province in Kenya and adopted sequential mixed methods design combing both qualitative and quantitative phases. Qualitative data was analyzed using grounded theory analysis method. Structural equation modeling using maximum likelihood was used to analyze quantitative data. The results based on the common fit indices revealed that the theory of planned behavior fitted the data acceptably well among the Type 2 diabetes and within dietary behavior {χ2 = 223.3, df = 77, p = .02, χ2/df = 2.9, n=237; TLI = .93; CFI =.91; RMSEA (90CI) = .090(.039, .146)}. This implies that the Theory of Planned Behavior holds and forms a framework for promoting dietary practice among Type 2 diabetics.
  • Chemotherapy Safety Protocol for Oncology Nurses: It's Effect on Their Protective Measures Practices
    Authors: Magda M. Mohsen, Manal E. Fareed, Keywords: Chemotherapy Safety protocol, Effect, protective measure practice. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1087588 Abstract: Background: Widespread use of chemotherapeutic drugs in the treatment of cancer has lead to higher health hazards among employee who handle and administer such drugs, so nurses should know how to protect themselves, their patients and their work environment against toxic effects of chemotherapy. Aim of this study was carried out to examine the effect of chemotherapy safety protocol for oncology nurses on their protective measure practices. Design: A quasi experimental research design was utilized. Setting: The study was carried out in oncology department of Menoufia university hospital and Tanta oncology treatment center. Sample: A convenience sample of forty five nurses in Tanta oncology treatment center and eighteen nurses in Menoufiya oncology department. Tools: 1. an interviewing questionnaire that covering sociodemographic data, assessment of unit and nurses' knowledge about chemotherapy. II: Obeservational check list to assess nurses' actual practices of handling and adminestration of chemotherapy. A base line data were assessed before implementing Chemotherapy Safety protocol, then Chemotherapy Safety protocol was implemented, and after 2 monthes they were assessed again. Results: reveled that 88.9% of study group I and 55.6% of study group II improved to good total knowledge scores after educating on the safety protocol, also 95.6% of study group I and 88.9% of study group II had good total practice score after educating on the safety protocol. Moreover less than half of group I (44.4%) reported that heavy workload is the most barriers for them, while the majority of group II (94.4%) had many barriers for adhering to the safety protocol such as they didn’t know the protocol, the heavy work load and inadequate equipment. Conclusions: Safety protocol for Oncology Nurses seemed to have positive effect on improving nurses' knowledge and practice. Recommendation: chemotherapy safety protocol should be instituted for all oncology nurses who are working in any oncology unit and/ or center to enhance compliance, and this protocol should be done at frequent intervals.