CHILD HEALTH NURSING CONFERENCE


Child Health Nursing Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Child Health Nursing is a conference track under the Nursing Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Nursing.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Nursing).

Child Health Nursing is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Child Health Nursing Conference Track will be held at “Nursing Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2020” - “Nursing Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Paris, France in July 2020” - “Nursing Conference in New York, United States in August 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2020” - “Nursing Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2020” - “Nursing Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” - “Nursing Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2021” - “Nursing Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2021” - “Nursing Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2021” - “Nursing Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2021” - “Nursing Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2021” - “Nursing Conference in Paris, France in July 2021” - “Nursing Conference in New York, United States in August 2021” - “Nursing Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2021” - “Nursing Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2021” - “Nursing Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2021” - “Nursing Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2021” - “Nursing Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2021” - “Nursing Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2021” - “Nursing Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2021” - “Nursing Conference in Paris, France in December 2021” .

Child Health Nursing is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

VII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

VIII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

IX. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

X. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

XI. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

XII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC09JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIV. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 22, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC10ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XV. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVI. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIX. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XX. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline January 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21NC02GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XX. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline January 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21NC02GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXI. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline March 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21NC04ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 01, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21NC05TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 06, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21NC06US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIV. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline June 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21NC07FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXV. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2021
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline July 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21NC08US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVI. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2021
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21NC09JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2021
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21NC09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVIII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 22, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21NC10ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIX. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21NC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXX. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21NC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXI. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2021
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21NC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2021
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21NC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXIII. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline April 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline April 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21NC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder
FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

II. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

JUNE 26 - 27, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

V. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

FINISHED

VI. INTERNATIONAL NURSING CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

Nursing Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Child Health Nursing Conference"

  • The Evaluation of Complete Blood Cell Count-Based Inflammatory Markers in Pediatric Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome
    Authors: Mustafa M. Donma, Orkide Donma, Keywords: Children, complete blood cell count, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, metabolic syndrome, obesity. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Obesity is defined as a severe chronic disease characterized by a low-grade inflammatory state. Therefore, inflammatory markers gained utmost importance during the evaluation of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS), a disease characterized by central obesity, elevated blood pressure, increased fasting blood glucose and elevated triglycerides or reduced high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) values. Some inflammatory markers based upon complete blood cell count (CBC) are available. In this study, it was questioned which inflammatory marker was the best to evaluate the differences between various obesity groups. 514 pediatric individuals were recruited. 132 children with MetS, 155 morbid obese (MO), 90 obese (OB), 38 overweight (OW) and 99 children with normal BMI (N-BMI) were included into the scope of this study. Obesity groups were constituted using age- and sex-dependent body mass index (BMI) percentiles tabulated by World Health Organization. MetS components were determined to be able to specify children with MetS. CBC were determined using automated hematology analyzer. HDL-C analysis was performed. Using CBC parameters and HDL-C values, ratio markers of inflammation, which cover neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), derived neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (dNLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR), monocyte-to-HDL-C ratio (MHR) were calculated. Statistical analyses were performed. The statistical significance degree was considered as p < 0.05. There was no statistically significant difference among the groups in terms of platelet count, neutrophil count, lymphocyte count, monocyte count, and NLR. PLR differed significantly between OW and N-BMI as well as MetS. Monocyte-to HDL-C value exhibited statistical significance between MetS and N-BMI, OB, and MO groups. HDL-C value differed between MetS and N-BMI, OW, OB, MO groups. MHR was the ratio, which exhibits the best performance among the other CBC-based inflammatory markers. On the other hand, when MHR was compared to HDL-C only, it was suggested that HDL-C has given much more valuable information. Therefore, this parameter still keeps its value from the diagnostic point of view. Our results suggest that MHR can be an inflammatory marker during the evaluation of pediatric MetS, but the predictive value of this parameter was not superior to HDL-C during the evaluation of obesity.
  • The Potential Involvement of Platelet Indices in Insulin Resistance in Morbid Obese Children
    Authors: Orkide Donma, Mustafa M. Donma, Keywords: Children, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, plateletcrit, platelet indices. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Association between insulin resistance (IR) and hematological parameters has long been a matter of interest. Within this context, body mass index (BMI), red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets were involved in this discussion. Parameters related to platelets associated with IR may be useful indicators for the identification of IR. Platelet indices such as mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW) and plateletcrit (PCT) are being questioned for their possible association with IR. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between platelet (PLT) count as well as PLT indices and the surrogate indices used to determine IR in morbid obese (MO) children. A total of 167 children participated in the study. Three groups were constituted. The number of cases was 34, 97 and 36 children in the normal BMI, MO and metabolic syndrome (MetS) groups, respectively. Sex- and age-dependent BMI-based percentile tables prepared by World Health Organization were used for the definition of morbid obesity. MetS criteria were determined. BMI values, homeostatic model assessment for IR (HOMA-IR), alanine transaminase-to-aspartate transaminase ratio (ALT/AST) and diagnostic obesity notation model assessment laboratory (DONMA-lab) index values were computed. PLT count and indices were analyzed using automated hematology analyzer. Data were collected for statistical analysis using SPSS for Windows. Arithmetic mean and standard deviation were calculated. Mean values of PLT-related parameters in both control and study groups were compared by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey post hoc tests to determine whether a significant difference exists among the groups. The correlation analyses between PLT as well as IR indices were performed. Statistically significant difference was accepted as p-value < 0.05. Increased values were detected for PLT (p < 0.01) and PCT (p > 0.05) in MO group compared to those observed in children with N-BMI. Significant increases for PLT (p < 0.01) and PCT (p < 0.05) were observed in MetS group in comparison with the values obtained in children with N-BMI (p < 0.01). Significantly lower MPV and PDW values were obtained in MO group compared to the control group (p < 0.01). HOMA-IR (p < 0.05), DONMA-lab index (p < 0.001) and ALT/AST (p < 0.001) values in MO and MetS groups were significantly increased compared to the N-BMI group. On the other hand, DONMA-lab index values also differed between MO and MetS groups (p < 0.001). In the MO group, PLT was negatively correlated with MPV and PDW values. These correlations were not observed in the N-BMI group. None of the IR indices exhibited a correlation with PLT and PLT indices in the N-BMI group. HOMA-IR showed significant correlations both with PLT and PCT in the MO group. All of the three IR indices were well-correlated with each other in all groups. These findings point out the missing link between IR and PLT activation. In conclusion, PLT and PCT may be related to IR in addition to their identities as hemostasis markers during morbid obesity. Our findings have suggested that DONMA-lab index appears as the best surrogate marker for IR due to its discriminative feature between morbid obesity and MetS.
  • Development of Sports Nation on the Way of Health Management
    Authors: Beatrix Faragó, Zsolt Szakály, Ágnes Kovácsné Tóth, Csaba Konczos, Norbert Kovács, Zsófia Pápai, Tamás Kertész, Keywords: Competitiveness, health behavior, health economy, health management, sports nation. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The future of the nation is the embodiment of a healthy society. A key segment of government policy is the development of health and a health-oriented environment. As a result, sport as an activator of health is an important area for development. In Hungary, sport is a strategic sector with the aim of developing a sports nation. The function of sport in the global society is multifaceted, which is manifested in both social and economic terms. The economic importance of sport is gaining ground in the world, with implications for Central and Eastern Europe. Smaller states, such as Hungary, cannot ignore the economic effects of exploiting the effects of sport. The relationship between physical activity and health is driven by the health economy towards the nation's economic factor. In our research, we analyzed sport as a national strategy sector and its impact on age groups. By presenting the current state of health behavior, we get an idea of the directions where development opportunities require even more intervention. The foundation of the health of a nation is the young age group, whose shaping of health will shape the future generation. Our research was attended by university students from the Faculty of Health and Sports Sciences who will be experts in the field of health in the future. The other group is the elderly, who are a growing social group due to demographic change and are a key segment of the labor market and consumer society. Our study presents the health behavior of the two age groups, their differences, and similarities. The survey also identifies gaps in the development of a health management strategy that national strategies should take into account.
  • Associations between Surrogate Insulin Resistance Indices and the Risk of Metabolic Syndrome in Children
    Authors: Mustafa M. Donma, Orkide Donma, Keywords: Children, insulin resistance indices, metabolic syndrome, obesity. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3669293 Abstract: A well-defined insulin resistance (IR) is one of the requirements for the good understanding and evaluation of metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, underlying causes for the development of IR are not clear. Endothelial dysfunction also participates in the pathogenesis of this disease. IR indices are being determined in various obesity groups and also in diagnosing MetS. Components of MetS have been well established and used in adult studies. However, there are some ambiguities particularly in the field of pediatrics. The aims of this study were to compare the performance of fasting blood glucose (FBG), one of MetS components, with some other IR indices and check whether FBG may be replaced by some other parameter or ratio for a better evaluation of pediatric MetS. Five-hundred and forty-nine children were involved in the study. Five groups were constituted. Groups 109, 40, 100, 166, 110, 24 children were included in normal-body mass index (N-BMI), overweight (OW), obese (OB), morbid obese (MO), MetS with two components (MetS2) and MetS with three components (MetS3) groups, respectively. Age and sex-adjusted BMI percentiles tabulated by World Health Organization were used for the classification of obesity groups. MetS components were determined. Aside from one of the MetS components-FBG, eight measures of IR [homeostatic model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR), homeostatic model assessment of beta cell function (HOMA-%β), alanine transaminase-to-aspartate transaminase ratio (ALT/AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), insulin (INS), insulin-to-FBG ratio (INS/FBG), the product of fasting triglyceride and glucose (TyG) index, McAuley index] were evaluated. Statistical analyses were performed. A p value less than 0.05 was accepted as the statistically significance degree. Mean values for BMI of the groups were 15.7 kg/m2, 21.0 kg/m2, 24.7 kg/m2, 27.1 kg/m2, 28.7 kg/m2, 30.4 kg/m2 for N-BMI, OW, OB, MO, MetS2, MetS3, respectively. Differences between the groups were significant (p < 0.001). The only exception was MetS2-MetS3 couple, in spite of an increase detected in MetS3 group. Waist-to-hip circumference ratios significantly differed only for N-BMI vs, OB, MO, MetS2; OW vs MO; OB vs MO, MetS2 couples. ALT and ALT/AST did not differ significantly among MO-MetS2-MetS3. HOMA-%β differed only between MO and MetS2. INS/FBG, McAuley index and TyG were not significant between MetS2 and MetS3. HOMA-IR and FBG were not significant between MO and MetS2. INS was the only parameter, which showed statistically significant differences between MO-MetS2, MO-MetS3, and MetS2-MetS3. In conclusion, these findings have suggested that FBG presently considered as one of the five MetS components, may be replaced by INS during the evaluation of pediatric morbid obesity and MetS.
  • Automated Monitoring System to Support Investigation of Contributing Factors of Work-Related Disorders and Accidents
    Authors: Erika R. Chambriard, Sandro C. Izidoro, Davidson P. Mendes, Douglas E. V. Pires, Keywords: Arduino prototyping, occupational health and hygiene, work environment, work-related disorders prevention. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Work-related illnesses and disorders have been a constant aspect of work. Although their nature has changed over time, from musculoskeletal disorders to illnesses related to psychosocial aspects of work, its impact on the life of workers remains significant. Despite significant efforts worldwide to protect workers, the disparity between changes in work legislation and actual benefit for workers’ health has been creating a significant economic burden for social security and health systems around the world. In this context, this study aims to propose, test and validate a modular prototype that allows for work environmental aspects to be assessed, monitored and better controlled. The main focus is also to provide a historical record of working conditions and the means for workers to obtain comprehensible and useful information regarding their work environment and legal limits of occupational exposure to different types of environmental variables, as means to improve prevention of work-related accidents and disorders. We show the developed prototype provides useful and accurate information regarding the work environmental conditions, validating them with standard occupational hygiene equipment. We believe the proposed prototype is a cost-effective and adequate approach to work environment monitoring that could help elucidate the links between work and occupational illnesses, and that different industry sectors, as well as developing countries, could benefit from its capabilities.
  • Effects of Repetitive Strain/Stress Injury on the Human Body
    Authors: Mohd Abdullah, Keywords: Health, wellness, repetitive, chairs. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3593218 Abstract: This review describes some of the effects of repetitive strain/stress injury (RSI) on the human body especially among computer professionals today that spend extended hours of prolonged sitting in front of a computer day in and day out. The review briefly introduces the main factors that contribute to an increase of RSI among such computer professionals. The review briefly discusses how the human spinal column and knees are mainly affected by the onset of RSI resulting in poor posture. The root and secondary causes and effects of RSI are reviewed. The importance and value of the various breathing techniques are reviewed in an attempt to alleviate some of the effects of RSI. The review concludes with a small sample of suggested office stretches and poses geared towards at reducing RSI follows in this review. Readers will learn about the effects of RSI, as well as ways to cope with it. A better understanding of coping strategies may lead to well-being and a healthier overall lifestyle. Ultimately, the investment of time to connect with oneself with the poses and the power of the breath would promote a well-being that is overall healthier thus resulting in a better ability to cope/manage life stresses.
  • Fingers Exergames to Improve Fine Motor Skill in Autistic Children
    Authors: Zulhisyam Salleh, Fizatul Aini Patakor, Rosilah Wahab, Awangku Khairul Ridzwan Awangku Jaya, Keywords: Autism children, Arduino project, fine motor skill, finger exergame. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3593180 Abstract: Autism is a lifelong developmental disability that affects how people perceive the world and interact with others. Most of these children have difficulty with fine motor skills which typically struggle with handwriting and fine activities in their routine life such as getting dressed and controlled use of the everyday tool. Because fine motor activities encompass so many routine functions, a fine motor delay can have a measurable negative impact on a person's ability to handle daily practical tasks. This project proposed a simple fine motor exercise aid plus the game (exergame) for autistic children who discover from fine motor difficulties. The proposed exergame will be blinking randomly and user needs to bend their finger accordingly. It will notify the user, whether they bend the right finger or not. The system is realized using Arduino, which is programmed to control all the operated circuit. The feasibility studies with six autistic children were conducted and found the child interested in using exergame and could quickly get used to it. This study provides important guidance for future investigations of the exergame potential for accessing and improving fine motor skill among autistic children.
  • Bio-Psycho-Social Consequences and Effects in Fall-Efficacy Scale in Seniors Using Exercise Intervention of Motor Learning According to Yoga Techniques
    Authors: Milada Krejci, Martin Hill, Vaclav Hosek, Dobroslava Jandova, Jiri Kajzar, Pavel Blaha, Keywords: Exercises, balance, seniors 65+, health, mental and social balance. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The paper declares effects of exercise intervention of the research project “Basic research of balance changes in seniors”, granted by the Czech Science Foundation. The objective of the presented study is to define predictors, which influence bio-psycho-social consequences and effects of balance ability in senior 65 years old and above. We focused on the Fall-Efficacy Scale changes evaluation in seniors. Comprehensive hypothesis of the project declares, that motion uncertainty (dyskinesia) can negatively affect the well-being of a senior in bio-psycho-social context. In total, random selection and testing of 100 seniors (30 males, 70 females) from Prague and Central Bohemian region was provided. The sample was divided by stratified random selection into experimental and control groups, who underwent input and output testing. For diagnostics the methods of Medical Anamnesis, Functional anthropological examinations, Tinetti Balance Assessment Tool, SF-36 Health Survey, Anamnestic comparative self-assessment scale were used. Intervention method called "Life in Balance" based on yoga techniques was applied in four-week cycle. Results of multivariate regression were verified by repeated measures ANOVA: subject factor, phase of intervention (between-subject factor), body fluid (within-subject factor) and phase of intervention × body fluid interaction). ANOVA was performed with a repetition involving the factors of subjects, experimental/control group, phase of intervention (independent variable), and x phase interaction followed by Bonferroni multiple comparison assays with a test strength of at least 0.8 on the probability level p < 0.05. In the paper results of the first-year investigation of the three years running project are analysed. Results of balance tests confirmed no significant difference between females and males in pre-test. Significant improvements in balance and walking ability were observed in experimental group in females comparing to males (F = 128.4, p < 0.001). In the females control group, there was no significant change in post- test, while in the female experimental group positive changes in posture and spine flexibility in post-tests were found. It seems that females even in senior age react better to incentives of intervention in balance and spine flexibility. On the base of results analyses, we can declare the significant improvement in social balance markers after intervention in the experimental group (F = 10.5, p < 0.001). In average, seniors are used to take four drugs daily. Number of drugs can contribute to allergy symptoms and balance problems. It can be concluded that static balance and walking ability of seniors according Tinetti Balance scale correlate significantly with psychic and social monitored markers.
  • Investigation of the Medical Malpractice Tendency of Student Nurses
    Authors: Serap Torun, Osman Bilgin, Ceylan Bıçkıcı, Keywords: nursing student, medical malpractice, nursing, tendency, patient safety DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3454951 Abstract: Introduction: Medical malpractice can be defined as health workers neglecting the expected standard or intentionally not implementing it, doing it wrong and/or incomplete, not being able to implement the accurate practice due to personal or systemic reasons despite desiring to do it correctly and the condition that causes permanent or temporary damage to the patient as a result. If the training periods in which health workers improve their knowledge and skills are passed efficiently, they are expected to have a low rate of error in their professional lives. Aim: Aim of the study is to determine the medical malpractice tendencies of students studying in nursing department. Material and Methods: This descriptive research has been performed with 454 students who study in 3rd and 4th years in the Nursing Department of the Faculty of Health Sciences in a state university in normal and evening education and go out for clinical practice during the 2017-2018 academic year. The sample consisted of 454 students who agreed to participate in the study. Ethics committee approval, the permission of the institution and the verbal consent of the participants were obtained. In collection of data, ‘Personal Information Form’ developed by the researchers and the Malpractice Tendency Scale (SMT) were used. The data were analyzed using SPSS 20 package program. 0.05 was used as the level of significance. Results: The Cronbach’s alpha internal consistency coefficient of the scale was 0.94 and the total mean value of the scale was 211.69 ± 22.14. The mean age of the participants was 22,08 ± 1,852 years; 165 (36,4%) were male and 288 (63,6%) were female. Their mean General Point Average (GPA) was 2.65 ± 0.454 (min 1.03 - max 3.90). Students' average duration of self study per week was 2.89 ± 3.81 (min 0 - max 30) hours. The mean score (80.73) of the 4th year students in the sub-dimension of Drug and Transfusion Applications was significantly higher than the mean score (79.20) of 3rd year students (p < 0.05). The mean score (81.01) of the Drug and Transfusion Applications sub-dimension of those who willingly chose the profession was higher than the mean score (78.88) of those who chose the profession unwillingly. The mean average score (21.48) of Fallings sub-dimension of students who cared for 3 to 4 patients per day was lower than the mean score (22.41) of those who cared for 5 patients and over daily on average (p < 0.05). Conclusion: As a result of this study, it was concluded that malpractice tendency of nursing students was low, and an inverse relationship was found between the duration of education and malpractice tendency.
  • Sustainability of Healthcare Insurance in India: A Review of Health Insurance Scheme Launched by States in India
    Authors: Mohd Zuhair, Ram Babu Roy, Keywords: Health insurance, out of pocket expenditure, universal healthcare, sustainability. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: This paper presents an overview of the accessibility, design, and functioning of health insurance plans launched by state governments in India. In recent years, the governments of several states in India have come forward to provide health insurance coverage for the low-income group and rural population to reduce the out of pocket expenditure (OPE) on healthcare. Different health insurance schemes have different structures and offerings which differ in the different demographic factors. This study will portray a comparative analysis of the various health insurance schemes by analyzing different offerings and finance generation of the schemes. The comparative analysis will explain the lesson to be learned from these schemes and extend the existing knowledge of the health insurance in India. This would help in recognizing tension between various drivers and identifying issues pertaining to the sustainability of health insurance schemes in India.