SIGN LANGUAGE CONFERENCE


Sign Language Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Sign Language is a conference track under the Language and Linguistics Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Language and Linguistics.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Language and Linguistics).

Sign Language is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Sign Language Conference Track will be held at “Language and Linguistics Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2020” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Paris, France in July 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in New York, United States in August 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Paris, France in December 2021” .

Sign Language is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

Final Call

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

Final Call

XIX. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

XX. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

XXI. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

XXII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

XXIII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

XXIV. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

XXV. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2021
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

XXVI. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2021
TOKYO, JAPAN

XXVII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2021
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

XXVIII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

XXIX. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

XXX. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

XXXI. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2021
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

XXXII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2021
BANGKOK, THAILAND

XXXIII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

V. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

FINISHED

VI. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

VII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

VIII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

IX. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

X. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

XI. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

FINISHED

XIII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

FINISHED

XIV. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

XV. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XVI. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

XVII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

Previously Published Papers on "Sign Language Conference"

  • Design and Māori Values: A Rebrand Project for the Social Enterprise Sector
    Authors: M. Kiarna, S. Junjira, S. Casey, M. Nolwazi, M. S. Marcos, A. T. Tatiana, L. Cassandra, Keywords: Design in Aotearoa New Zealand, Kaupapa Māori, branding, design education, human-centered design. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: This paper details a rebrand design project developed for a non-profitable organization called Te Roopu Waiora (TRW), which is currently located in Auckland, Aotearoa New Zealand. This social enterprise is dedicated to supporting the Māori community living with sensorial, physical and intellectual disabilities (whānau hauā). As part of a year three bachelor design brief, the rebrand project enabled students to reflect on Kaupapa Māori principles and appropriately address the values of the organisation. As such, the methodology used a pragmatic paradigm approach and mixed methods design practices involving a human-centred design to problem solving. As result, the student project culminated in the development in a range of cohesive design artefacts, aiming to improve the rentability and perception of the brand with the audience and stakeholders.
  • Language Policy as an Instrument for Nation Building and Minority Representation: Supporting Cases from South Asia
    Authors: Kevin You, Keywords: Language policy, South Asia, nation building, Artificial states. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Nation-building has been a key consideration in ethno-linguistically diverse post-colonial ‘artificial states’, where ethnic tensions, religious differences and the risk of persecution of minorities are common. Language policy can help with nation-building, but it can also hinder the process. An important challenge is in recognising which language policy to adopt. This article proposes that the designation of a widely used lingua franca as a national language (in an official capacity or otherwise) - in a culturally, ethnically and linguistically diverse post-colonial state - assists its nation-building efforts in the long run. To demonstrate, this paper looks at the cases of Sri Lanka, Indonesia and India: three young nations which together emerged out of the Second World War with comparable colonial experiences, but subsequently adopted different language policies to different effects. Insights presented underscore the significance of inclusive language policy in sustainable nation-building in states with comparable post-colonial experiences.
  • Resource Allocation and Task Scheduling with Skill Level and Time Bound Constraints
    Authors: Salam Saudagar, Ankit Kamboj, Niraj Mohan, Satgounda Patil, Nilesh Powar, Keywords: Assignment, deadline, greedy approach, hungarian algorithm, operations research, scheduling. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Task Assignment and Scheduling is a challenging Operations Research problem when there is a limited number of resources and comparatively higher number of tasks. The Cost Management team at Cummins needs to assign tasks based on a deadline and must prioritize some of the tasks as per business requirements. Moreover, there is a constraint on the resources that assignment of tasks should be done based on an individual skill level, that may vary for different tasks. Another constraint is for scheduling the tasks that should be evenly distributed in terms of number of working hours, which adds further complexity to this problem. The proposed greedy approach to solve assignment and scheduling problem first assigns the task based on management priority and then by the closest deadline. This is followed by an iterative selection of an available resource with the least allocated total working hours for a task, i.e. finding the local optimal choice for each task with the goal of determining the global optimum. The greedy approach task allocation is compared with a variant of Hungarian Algorithm, and it is observed that the proposed approach gives an equal allocation of working hours among the resources. The comparative study of the proposed approach is also done with manual task allocation and it is noted that the visibility of the task timeline has increased from 2 months to 6 months. An interactive dashboard app is created for the greedy assignment and scheduling approach and the tasks with more than 2 months horizon that were waiting in a queue without a delivery date initially are now analyzed effectively by the business with expected timelines for completion.
  • The Significance of Cultural Risks for Western Consultants Executing Gulf Cooperation Council Megaprojects
    Authors: Alan Walsh, Peter Walker, Keywords: Western consultants in megaprojects, national culture impacts on GCC Megaprojects, significant risk factors in megaprojects, professional culture in megaprojects. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Differences in commercial, professional and personal cultural traditions between western consultants and project sponsors in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) region are potentially significant in the workplace, and this can impact on project outcomes. These cultural differences can, for example, result in conflict amongst senior managers, which can negatively impact the megaproject. New entrants to the GCC often experience ‘culture shock’ as they attempt to integrate into their unfamiliar environments. Megaprojects are unique ventures with individual project characteristics, which need to be considered when managing their associated risks. Megaproject research to date has mostly ignored the significance of the absence of cultural congruence in the GCC, which is surprising considering that there are large volumes of megaprojects in various stages of construction in the GCC. An initial step to dealing with cultural issues is to acknowledge culture as a significant risk factor (SRF). This paper seeks to understand the criticality for western consultants to address these risks. It considers the cultural barriers that exist between GCC sponsors and western consultants and examines the cultural distance between the key actors. Initial findings suggest the presence to a certain extent of ethnocentricity. Other cultural clashes arise out of a lack of appreciation of the customs, practices and traditions of ‘the Other’, such as the need for avoiding public humiliation and the hierarchal significance rankings. The concept and significance of cultural shock as part of the integration process for new arrivals are considered. Culture shock describes the state of anxiety and frustration resulting from the immersion in a culture distinctly different from one's own. There are potentially substantial project risks associated with underestimating the process of cultural integration. This paper examines two distinct but intertwined issues: the societal and professional culture differences associated with expatriate assignments. A case study examines the cultural congruences between GCC sponsors and American, British and German consultants, over a ten-year cycle. This provides indicators as to which nationalities encountered the most profound cultural issues and the nature of these. GCC megaprojects are typically intensive fast track demanding ventures, where consultant turnover is high. The study finds that building trust-filled relationships is key to successful project team integration and therefore, to successful megaproject execution. Findings indicate that both professional and social inclusion processes have steep learning curves. Traditional risk management practice is to approach any uncertainty in a structured way to mitigate the potential impact on project outcomes. This research highlights cultural risk as a significant factor in the management of GCC megaprojects. These risks arising from high staff turnover typically include loss of project knowledge, delays to the project, cost and disruption in replacing staff. This paper calls for cultural risk to be recognised as an SRF, as the first step to developing risk management strategies, and to reduce staff turnover for western consultants in GCC megaprojects.
  • Minimum Data of a Speech Signal as Special Indicators of Identification in Phonoscopy
    Authors: Nazaket Gazieva, Keywords: Biometric voice prints, fundamental frequency, phonogram, speech signal, temporal characteristics. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Voice biometric data associated with physiological, psychological and other factors are widely used in forensic phonoscopy. There are various methods for identifying and verifying a person by voice. This article explores the minimum speech signal data as individual parameters of a speech signal. Monozygotic twins are believed to be genetically identical. Using the minimum data of the speech signal, we came to the conclusion that the voice imprint of monozygotic twins is individual. According to the conclusion of the experiment, we can conclude that the minimum indicators of the speech signal are more stable and reliable for phonoscopic examinations.
  • A Surrealist Play of Associations: Neoliberalism, Critical Pedagogy and Surrealism in Secondary English Language Arts
    Authors: Stephanie Ho, Keywords: Arts-informed pedagogies, language arts, literature, Surrealism. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: This project utilizes principles derived from the Surrealist movement to prioritize creative and critical thinking in secondary English Language Arts (ELA). The implementation of Surrealist-style pedagogies within an ELA classroom will be rooted in critical, radical pedagogy, which addresses the injustices caused by economic-oriented educational systems. The use of critical pedagogy will enable the subversive artistic and political aims of Surrealism to be transmitted to a classroom context. Through aesthetic reading strategies, appreciative questioning and dialogue, students will actively critique the power dynamics which structure (and often restrict) their lives. Within the ELA domain, cost-effective approaches often replace the actual “arts” of ELA. This research will therefore explore how Surrealist-oriented pedagogies could restore imaginative freedom and deconstruct conceptual barriers (normative standards, curricular constraints, and status quo power relations) in secondary ELA. This research will also examine how Surrealism can be used as a political and pedagogical model to treat societal problems mirrored in ELA classrooms. The stakeholders are teachers, as they experience constant pressure within their practices. Similarly, students encounter rigorous, results-based pressures. These dynamics contribute to feelings of powerlessness, thus reinforcing a formulaic model of ELA. The ELA curriculum has potential to create laboratories for critical discussion and active movement towards social change. This proposed research strategy of Surrealist-oriented pedagogies could enable students to experiment with social issues and develop senses of agency and voice that reflect awareness of contemporary society while simultaneously building their ELA skills.
  • Tibyan Automated Arabic Correction Using Machine-Learning in Detecting Syntactical Mistakes
    Authors: Ashwag O. Maghraby, Nida N. Khan, Hosnia A. Ahmed, Ghufran N. Brohi, Hind F. Assouli, Jawaher S. Melibari, Keywords: Arabic Language acquisition and learning, natural language processing, morphological analyzer, part-of-speech. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The Arabic language is one of the most important languages. Learning it is so important for many people around the world because of its religious and economic importance and the real challenge lies in practicing it without grammatical or syntactical mistakes. This research focused on detecting and correcting the syntactic mistakes of Arabic syntax according to their position in the sentence and focused on two of the main syntactical rules in Arabic: Dual and Plural. It analyzes each sentence in the text, using Stanford CoreNLP morphological analyzer and machine-learning approach in order to detect the syntactical mistakes and then correct it. A prototype of the proposed system was implemented and evaluated. It uses support vector machine (SVM) algorithm to detect Arabic grammatical errors and correct them using the rule-based approach. The prototype system has a far accuracy 81%. In general, it shows a set of useful grammatical suggestions that the user may forget about while writing due to lack of familiarity with grammar or as a result of the speed of writing such as alerting the user when using a plural term to indicate one person.
  • Design for Classroom Units: A Collaborative Multicultural Studio Development with Chinese Students
    Authors: C. S. Caires, A. Barbosa, W. Hanyou, Keywords: Product design, interface design, interactive design, collaborative education and design research, design prototyping. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: In this paper, we present the main results achieved during a five-week international workshop on Interactive Furniture for the Classroom, with 22 Chinese design students, in Jiangmen city (Guangdong province, China), and five teachers from Portugal, France, Iran, Macao SAR, and China. The main goal was to engage design students from China with new skills and practice methodologies towards interactive design research for furniture and product design for the classroom. The final results demonstrate students' concerns on improving Chinese furniture design for the classrooms, including solutions related to collaborative learning and human-interaction design for interactive furniture products. The findings of the research led students to the fabrication of five original prototypes: two for kindergartens ('Candy' and 'Tilt-tilt'), two for primary schools ('Closer' and 'Eks(x)'), and one for art/creative schools ('Wave'). From the findings, it was also clear that collaboration, personalization, and project-based teaching are still neglected when designing furniture products for the classroom in China. Students focused on these issues and came up with creative solutions that could transform this educational field in China.
  • Training Undergraduate Engineering Students in Robotics and Automation through Model-Based Design Training: A Case Study at Assumption University of Thailand
    Authors: Sajed A. Habib, Keywords: Automation, industry 4.0, model-based design training, problem-based learning. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Problem-based learning (PBL) is a student-centered pedagogy that originated in the medical field and has also been used extensively in other knowledge disciplines with recognized advantages and limitations. PBL has been used in various undergraduate engineering programs with mixed outcomes. The current fourth industrial revolution (digital era or Industry 4.0) has made it essential for many science and engineering students to receive effective training in advanced courses such as industrial automation and robotics. This paper presents a case study at Assumption University of Thailand, where a PBL-like approach was used to teach some aspects of automation and robotics to selected groups of undergraduate engineering students. These students were given some basic level training in automation prior to participating in a subsequent training session in order to solve technical problems with increased complexity. The participating students’ evaluation of the training sessions in terms of learning effectiveness, skills enhancement, and incremental knowledge following the problem-solving session was captured through a follow-up survey consisting of 14 questions and a 5-point scoring system. From the most recent training event, an overall 70% of the respondents indicated that their skill levels were enhanced to a much greater level than they had had before the training, whereas 60.4% of the respondents from the same event indicated that their incremental knowledge following the session was much greater than what they had prior to the training. The instructor-facilitator involved in the training events suggested that this method of learning was more suitable for senior/advanced level students than those at the freshmen level as certain skills to effectively participate in such problem-solving sessions are acquired over a period of time, and not instantly.
  • The Effect of Symmetry on the Perception of Happiness and Boredom in Design Products
    Authors: Michele Sinico, Keywords: Product experience, emotional design, symmetry, expressive qualities. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The present research investigates the effect of symmetry on the perception of happiness and boredom in design products. Three experiments were carried out in order to verify the degree of the visual expressive value on different models of bookcases, wall clocks, and chairs. 60 participants directly indicated the degree of happiness and boredom using 7-point rating scales. The findings show that the participants acknowledged a different value of expressive quality in the different product models. Results show also that symmetry is not a significant constraint for an emotional design project.