LINGUISTIC RELATIVITY CONFERENCE


Linguistic Relativity Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Linguistic Relativity is a conference track under the Language and Linguistics Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Language and Linguistics.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Language and Linguistics).

Linguistic Relativity is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Linguistic Relativity Conference Track will be held at “Language and Linguistics Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2020” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Paris, France in July 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in New York, United States in August 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Paris, France in December 2021” .

Linguistic Relativity is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

Final Call

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

Final Call

XIX. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

XX. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

XXI. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

XXII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

XXIII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

XXIV. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

XXV. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2021
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

XXVI. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2021
TOKYO, JAPAN

XXVII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2021
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

XXVIII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

XXIX. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

XXX. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

XXXI. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2021
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

XXXII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2021
BANGKOK, THAILAND

XXXIII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

V. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

FINISHED

VI. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

VII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

VIII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

IX. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

X. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

XI. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

FINISHED

XIII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

FINISHED

XIV. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

XV. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XVI. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

XVII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

Previously Published Papers on "Linguistic Relativity Conference"

  • Analyzing Microblogs: Exploring the Psychology of Political Leanings
    Authors: Meaghan Bowman, Keywords: Colombia peace referendum, FARC, hashtags, linguistics, microblogging, social media. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Microblogging has become increasingly popular for commenting on current events, spreading gossip, and encouraging individualism--which favors its low-context communication channel. These social media (SM) platforms allow users to express opinions while interacting with a wide range of populations. Hashtags allow immediate identification of like-minded individuals worldwide on a vast array of topics. The output of the analytic tool, Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC)--a program that associates psychological meaning with the frequency of use of specific words--may suggest the nature of individuals’ internal states and general sentiments. When applied to groupings of SM posts unified by a hashtag, such information can be helpful to community leaders during periods in which the forming of public opinion happens in parallel with the unfolding of political, economic, or social events. This is especially true when outcomes stand to impact the well-being of the group. Here, we applied the online tools, Google Translate and the University of Texas’s LIWC, to a 90-posting sample from a corpus of Colombian Spanish microblogs. On translated disjoint sets, identified by hashtag as being authored by advocates of voting “No,” advocates voting “Yes,” and entities refraining from hashtag use, we observed the value of LIWC’s Tone feature as distinguishing among the categories and the word “peace,” as carrying particular significance, due to its frequency of use in the data.
  • Parametric Knowledge in Linguistic Structure
    Authors: Javier Andrés Morras Cortés, Keywords: conceptual parameters, conceptual structure, linguistic parameters, lexical concepts DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The linguistic and conceptual systems exhibit a tight relationship considering that words are access sites to conceptual structure. However, linguistic and conceptual structures seem to combine into a sort of homogeneous system which makes the distinction between them fuzzy. The article explores the possibility of positing a type of schematic linguistic content that is unique to the linguistic system. This linguistic content comes in the form of lexical concepts and linguistic parameters. These notions will shed some light on the parametric linguistic knowledge that might be encoded in and externalized via language. This in turn, could be the feature about language that differentiates it from the closely related conceptual system.
  • Words of Peace in the Speeches of the Egyptian President, Abdulfattah El-Sisi: A Corpus-Based Study
    Authors: Mohamed S. Negm, Waleed S. Mandour, Keywords: Corpus-assisted discourse studies, critical discourse analysis, collocation network, corpus linguistics. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The present study aims primarily at investigating words of peace (lexemes of peace) in the formal speeches of the Egyptian president Abdulfattah El-Sisi in a two-year span of time, from 2018 to 2019. This paper attempts to shed light not only on the contextual use of the antonyms, war and peace, but also it underpins quantitative analysis through the current methods of corpus linguistics. As such, the researchers have deployed a corpus-based approach in collecting, encoding, and processing 30 presidential speeches over the stated period (23,411 words and 25,541 tokens in total). Further, semantic fields and collocational networkzs are identified and compared statistically. Results have shown a significant propensity of adopting peace, including its relevant collocation network, textually and therefore, ideationally, at the expense of war concept which in most cases surfaces euphemistically through the noun conflict. The president has not justified the action of war with an honorable cause or a valid reason. Such results, so far, have indicated a positive sociopolitical mindset the Egyptian president possesses and moreover, reveal national and international fair dealing on arising issues.
  • Investigating Iraqi EFL University Students' Productive Knowledge of Grammatical Collocations in English
    Authors: Adnan Z. Mkhelif, Keywords: Corpus linguistics, frequency, grammatical collocations, L2 vocabulary learning, productive knowledge, proficiency, transparency. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Grammatical collocations (GCs) are word combinations containing a preposition or a grammatical structure, such as an infinitive (e.g. smile at, interested in, easy to learn, etc.). Such collocations tend to be difficult for Iraqi EFL university students (IUS) to master. To help address this problem, it is important to identify the factors causing it. This study aims at investigating the effects of L2 proficiency, frequency of GCs and their transparency on IUSs’ productive knowledge of GCs. The study involves 112 undergraduate participants with different proficiency levels, learning English in formal contexts in Iraq. The data collection instruments include (but not limited to) a productive knowledge test (designed by the researcher using the British National Corpus (BNC)), as well as the grammar part of the Oxford Placement Test (OPT). The study findings have shown that all the above-mentioned factors have significant effects on IUSs’ productive knowledge of GCs. In addition to establishing evidence of which factors of L2 learning might be relevant to learning GCs, it is hoped that the findings of the present study will contribute to more effective methods of teaching that can better address and help overcome the problems IUSs encounter in learning GCs. The study is thus hoped to have significant theoretical and pedagogical implications for researchers, syllabus designers as well as teachers of English as a foreign/second language.
  • The Analysis of Deceptive and Truthful Speech: A Computational Linguistic Based Method
    Authors: Seham El Kareh, Miramar Etman, Keywords: Egyptian Arabic corpus, computational analysis, deceptive features, forensic linguistics, human perception, truthful features. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3299393 Abstract: Recently, detecting liars and extracting features which distinguish them from truth-tellers have been the focus of a wide range of disciplines. To the author’s best knowledge, most of the work has been done on facial expressions and body gestures but only few works have been done on the language used by both liars and truth-tellers. This paper sheds light on four axes. The first axis copes with building an audio corpus for deceptive and truthful speech for Egyptian Arabic speakers. The second axis focuses on examining the human perception of lies and proving our need for computational linguistic-based methods to extract features which characterize truthful and deceptive speech. The third axis is concerned with building a linguistic analysis program that could extract from the corpus the inter- and intra-linguistic cues for deceptive and truthful speech. The program built here is based on selected categories from the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count program. Our results demonstrated that Egyptian Arabic speakers on one hand preferred to use first-person pronouns and present tense compared to the past tense when lying and their lies lacked of second-person pronouns, and on the other hand, when telling the truth, they preferred to use the verbs related to motion and the nouns related to time. The results also showed that there is a need for bigger data to prove the significance of words related to emotions and numbers.
  • Semantic Preference across Research Articles: A Corpus-Based Study of Adjectives in English
    Authors: Valdênia Carvalho e Almeida, Keywords: Applied linguistics, corpus linguistics, chemistry, research article, semantic preference. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3298862 Abstract: The goal of the present study is to investigate the semantic preference of the most frequent adjectives in research articles through a corpus-based analysis of texts published in journals in Applied Linguistics (AL). The corpus used in this study contains texts published in the period from 2014 to 2018 in the three journals: Language Learning and Technology; English for Academic Purposes, and TESOL Quaterly, totaling more than one million words. A corpus-based analysis was carried out on the corpus to identify the most frequent adjectives that co-occurred in the three journals. By observing the concordance lines of the adjectives and analyzing the words they associated with, the semantic preferences of each adjective were determined. Later, the AL corpus analysis was compared to the investigation of the same adjectives in a corpus of Chemistry. This second part of the study aimed to identify possible differences and similarities between the two corpora in relation to the use of the adjectives in research articles from both areas. The results show that there are some preferences which seem to be closely related not only to the academic genre of the texts but also to the specific domain of the discipline and, to a lesser extent, to the context of research in each journal. This research illustrates a possible contribution of Corpus Linguistics to explore the concept of semantic preference in more detail, considering the complex nature of the phenomenon.
  • Collaborative Stylistic Group Project: A Drama Practical Analysis Application
    Authors: Omnia F. Elkommos, Keywords: Applied linguistic theories, collaborative learning, cooperative principle, discourse analysis, drama analysis, group project, online acting performance, pragmatics, speech act theory, stylistics, technology enhanced learning. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3298817 Abstract: In the course of teaching stylistics to undergraduate students of the Department of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, the linguistic tool kit of theories comes in handy and useful for the better understanding of the different literary genres: Poetry, drama, and short stories. In the present paper, a model of teaching of stylistics is compiled and suggested. It is a collaborative group project technique for use in the undergraduate diverse specialisms (Literature, Linguistics and Translation tracks) class. Students initially are introduced to the different linguistic tools and theories suitable for each literary genre. The second step is to apply these linguistic tools to texts. Students are required to watch videos performing the poems or play, for example, and search the net for interpretations of the texts by other authorities. They should be using a template (prepared by the researcher) that has guided questions leading students along in their analysis. Finally, a practical analysis would be written up using the practical analysis essay template (also prepared by the researcher). As per collaborative learning, all the steps include activities that are student-centered addressing differentiation and considering their three different specialisms. In the process of selecting the proper tools, the actual application and analysis discussion, students are given tasks that request their collaboration. They also work in small groups and the groups collaborate in seminars and group discussions. At the end of the course/module, students present their work also collaboratively and reflect and comment on their learning experience. The module/course uses a drama play that lends itself to the task: ‘The Bond’ by Amy Lowell and Robert Frost. The project results in an interpretation of its theme, characterization and plot. The linguistic tools are drawn from pragmatics, and discourse analysis among others.
  • An Analysis of Language Borrowing among Algerian University Students Using Online Facebook Conversations
    Authors: Messaouda Annab, Keywords: Borrowing, language performance, linguistic background, social media. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2643854 Abstract: The rapid development of technology has led to an important context in which different languages and structures are used in the same conversations. This paper investigates the practice of language borrowing within social media platform, namely, Facebook among Algerian Vernacular Arabic (AVA) students. In other words, this study will explore how Algerian students have incorporated lexical English borrowing in their online conversations. This paper will examine the relationships between language, culture and identity among a multilingual group. The main objective is to determine the cultural and linguistic functions that borrowing fulfills in social media and to explain the possible factors underlying English borrowing. The nature of the study entails the use of an online research method that includes ten online Facebook conversations in the form of private messages collected from Bachelor and Masters Algerian students recruited from the English department at the University of Oum El-Bouaghi. The analysis of data revealed that social media platform provided the users with opportunities to shift from one language to another. This practice was noticed in students’ online conversations. English borrowing was the most relevant language performance in accordance with Arabic which is the mother tongue of the chosen sample. The analysis has assumed that participants are skilled in more than one language.
  • Reading and Teaching Poetry as Communicative Discourse: A Pragma-Linguistic Approach
    Authors: Omnia Elkommos, Keywords: Coda, commissives, communicative situation, context of culture, context of reference, context of utterance, dialogue, directives, discourse analysis, dramatic discourse interaction, duologue, embedded discourse levels, language for communication, linguistic structures, literary texts, poetry, pragmatic theories, reader response, speech acts (macro/micro), stylistics, teaching literature, TEFL, terms of address, turn-taking. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1340450 Abstract: Language is communication on several discourse levels. The target of teaching a language and the literature of a foreign language is to communicate a message. Reading, appreciating, analysing, and interpreting poetry as a sophisticated rhetorical expression of human thoughts, emotions, and philosophical messages is more feasible through the use of linguistic pragmatic tools from a communicative discourse perspective. The poet's intention, speech act, illocutionary act, and perlocutionary goal can be better understood when communicative situational context as well as linguistic discourse structure theories are employed. The use of linguistic theories in the teaching of poetry is, therefore, intrinsic to students' comprehension, interpretation, and appreciation of poetry of the different ages. It is the purpose of this study to show how both teachers as well as students can apply these linguistic theories and tools to dramatic poetic texts for an engaging, enlightening, and effective interpretation and appreciation of the language. Theories drawn from areas of pragmatics, discourse analysis, embedded discourse level, communicative situational context, and other linguistic approaches were applied to selected poetry texts from the different centuries. Further, in a simple statistical count of the number of poems with dialogic dramatic discourse with embedded two or three levels of discourse in different anthologies outweighs the number of descriptive poems with a one level of discourse, between the poet and the reader. Poetry is thus discourse on one, two, or three levels. It is, therefore, recommended that teachers and students in the area of ESL/EFL use the linguistics theories for a better understanding of poetry as communicative discourse. The practice of applying these linguistic theories in classrooms and in research will allow them to perceive the language and its linguistic, social, and cultural aspect. Texts will become live illocutionary acts with a perlocutionary acts goal rather than mere literary texts in anthologies.
  • Analysis of Linguistic Disfluencies in Bilingual Children’s Discourse
    Authors: Sheena Christabel Pravin, M. Palanivelan, Keywords: Bilingual, children who stutter, children with language impairment, Hidden Markov Models, multi-layer perceptron, linguistic disfluencies, stuttering disfluencies. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1317100 Abstract: Speech disfluencies are common in spontaneous speech. The primary purpose of this study was to distinguish linguistic disfluencies from stuttering disfluencies in bilingual Tamil–English (TE) speaking children. The secondary purpose was to determine whether their disfluencies are mediated by native language dominance and/or on an early onset of developmental stuttering at childhood. A detailed study was carried out to identify the prosodic and acoustic features that uniquely represent the disfluent regions of speech. This paper focuses on statistical modeling of repetitions, prolongations, pauses and interjections in the speech corpus encompassing bilingual spontaneous utterances from school going children – English and Tamil. Two classifiers including Hidden Markov Models (HMM) and the Multilayer Perceptron (MLP), which is a class of feed-forward artificial neural network, were compared in the classification of disfluencies. The results of the classifiers document the patterns of disfluency in spontaneous speech samples of school-aged children to distinguish between Children Who Stutter (CWS) and Children with Language Impairment CLI). The ability of the models in classifying the disfluencies was measured in terms of F-measure, Recall, and Precision.