ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING CONFERENCE


English Language Teaching Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. English Language Teaching is a conference track under the Language and Linguistics Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Language and Linguistics.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Language and Linguistics).

English Language Teaching is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to English Language Teaching Conference Track will be held at “Language and Linguistics Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2020” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Paris, France in July 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in New York, United States in August 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2021” - “Language and Linguistics Conference in Paris, France in December 2021” .

English Language Teaching is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

Final Call

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

Final Call

XIX. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

XX. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

XXI. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

XXII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

XXIII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

XXIV. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

XXV. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2021
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

XXVI. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2021
TOKYO, JAPAN

XXVII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2021
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

XXVIII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

XXIX. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

XXX. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

XXXI. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2021
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

XXXII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2021
BANGKOK, THAILAND

XXXIII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

V. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

FINISHED

VI. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

VII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

VIII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

IX. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

X. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

XI. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

FINISHED

XIII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

FINISHED

XIV. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

XV. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

XVI. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

XVII. INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

Previously Published Papers on "English Language Teaching Conference"

  • Language Policy as an Instrument for Nation Building and Minority Representation: Supporting Cases from South Asia
    Authors: Kevin You, Keywords: Language policy, South Asia, nation building, Artificial states. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Nation-building has been a key consideration in ethno-linguistically diverse post-colonial ‘artificial states’, where ethnic tensions, religious differences and the risk of persecution of minorities are common. Language policy can help with nation-building, but it can also hinder the process. An important challenge is in recognising which language policy to adopt. This article proposes that the designation of a widely used lingua franca as a national language (in an official capacity or otherwise) - in a culturally, ethnically and linguistically diverse post-colonial state - assists its nation-building efforts in the long run. To demonstrate, this paper looks at the cases of Sri Lanka, Indonesia and India: three young nations which together emerged out of the Second World War with comparable colonial experiences, but subsequently adopted different language policies to different effects. Insights presented underscore the significance of inclusive language policy in sustainable nation-building in states with comparable post-colonial experiences.
  • A Surrealist Play of Associations: Neoliberalism, Critical Pedagogy and Surrealism in Secondary English Language Arts
    Authors: Stephanie Ho, Keywords: Arts-informed pedagogies, language arts, literature, Surrealism. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: This project utilizes principles derived from the Surrealist movement to prioritize creative and critical thinking in secondary English Language Arts (ELA). The implementation of Surrealist-style pedagogies within an ELA classroom will be rooted in critical, radical pedagogy, which addresses the injustices caused by economic-oriented educational systems. The use of critical pedagogy will enable the subversive artistic and political aims of Surrealism to be transmitted to a classroom context. Through aesthetic reading strategies, appreciative questioning and dialogue, students will actively critique the power dynamics which structure (and often restrict) their lives. Within the ELA domain, cost-effective approaches often replace the actual “arts” of ELA. This research will therefore explore how Surrealist-oriented pedagogies could restore imaginative freedom and deconstruct conceptual barriers (normative standards, curricular constraints, and status quo power relations) in secondary ELA. This research will also examine how Surrealism can be used as a political and pedagogical model to treat societal problems mirrored in ELA classrooms. The stakeholders are teachers, as they experience constant pressure within their practices. Similarly, students encounter rigorous, results-based pressures. These dynamics contribute to feelings of powerlessness, thus reinforcing a formulaic model of ELA. The ELA curriculum has potential to create laboratories for critical discussion and active movement towards social change. This proposed research strategy of Surrealist-oriented pedagogies could enable students to experiment with social issues and develop senses of agency and voice that reflect awareness of contemporary society while simultaneously building their ELA skills.
  • Using Project MIND - Math Is Not Difficult Strategies to Help Children with Autism Improve Mathematics Skills
    Authors: Hui Fang Huang Su, Leanne Lai, Pei-Fen Li, Mei-Hwei Ho, Yu-Wen Chiu, Keywords: Young Children, Autism, Mathematics, Curriculum, teaching and learning, children with special needs, Project MIND. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: This study aimed to provide a practical, systematic, and comprehensive intervention for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). A pilot study of quasi-experimental pre-post intervention with control group design was conducted to evaluate if the mathematical intervention (Project MIND - Math Is Not Difficult) increases the math comprehension of children with ASD Children with ASD in the primary grades (K-1, 2) participated in math interventions to enhance their math comprehension and cognitive ability. The Bracken basic concept scale was used to evaluate subjects’ language skills, cognitive development, and school readiness. The study found that our systemic interventions of Project MIND significantly improved the mathematical and cognitive abilities in children with autism. The results of this study may lead to a major change in effective and adequate health care services for children with ASD and their families. All statistical analyses were performed with the IBM SPSS Statistics Version 25 for Windows. The significant level was set at 0.05 P-value.
  • Tibyan Automated Arabic Correction Using Machine-Learning in Detecting Syntactical Mistakes
    Authors: Ashwag O. Maghraby, Nida N. Khan, Hosnia A. Ahmed, Ghufran N. Brohi, Hind F. Assouli, Jawaher S. Melibari, Keywords: Arabic Language acquisition and learning, natural language processing, morphological analyzer, part-of-speech. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The Arabic language is one of the most important languages. Learning it is so important for many people around the world because of its religious and economic importance and the real challenge lies in practicing it without grammatical or syntactical mistakes. This research focused on detecting and correcting the syntactic mistakes of Arabic syntax according to their position in the sentence and focused on two of the main syntactical rules in Arabic: Dual and Plural. It analyzes each sentence in the text, using Stanford CoreNLP morphological analyzer and machine-learning approach in order to detect the syntactical mistakes and then correct it. A prototype of the proposed system was implemented and evaluated. It uses support vector machine (SVM) algorithm to detect Arabic grammatical errors and correct them using the rule-based approach. The prototype system has a far accuracy 81%. In general, it shows a set of useful grammatical suggestions that the user may forget about while writing due to lack of familiarity with grammar or as a result of the speed of writing such as alerting the user when using a plural term to indicate one person.
  • Curriculum Based Measurement and Precision Teaching in Writing Empowerment Enhancement: Results from an Italian Learning Center
    Authors: I. Pelizzoni, C. Cavallini, I. Salvaderi, F. Cavallini, Keywords: Precision teaching, writing skills, CBM, Italian Learning Center. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: We present the improvement in writing skills obtained by 94 participants (aged between six and 10 years) with special educational needs through a writing enhancement program based on fluency principles. The study was planned and conducted with a single-subject experimental plan for each of the participants, in order to confirm the results in the literature. These results were obtained using precision teaching (PT) methodology to increase the number of written graphemes per minute in the pre- and post-test, by curriculum based measurement (CBM). Results indicated an increase in the number of written graphemes for all participants. The average overall duration of the intervention is 144 minutes in five months of treatment. These considerations have been analyzed taking account of the complexity of the implementation of measurement systems in real operational contexts (an Italian learning center) and important aspects of replicability and cost-effectiveness of such interventions.
  • Collaborative Reflexive/Reflective Teaching and Action Research in TESL
    Authors: O. F. Elkommos, Keywords: Action research, addressing differentiation, collaborative teaching, reflective teaching and learning, reflexive learning, reflexive teaching, self-development, self-evaluation, TESL. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) has become a very rich area of research. Practitioners or teachers of English as a foreign or a second language are now promoting both collaborative learning and collaborative teaching. Students learning a language collaboratively and cooperatively are learning in a better environment of team work where they learn from each other. Further, teaching English collaboratively also creates an enriching environment that is also very enriching to students’ and teachers’ experiences of learning and teaching. Moreover, action research stems from actual teacher concerns and students’ needs. Reflection in turn, on the experience of the material taught and the delivery of material is becoming an integral part of the teaching and learning experience self- evaluation and self-development. In this case, the concern of the research field in the area of TESL will be the development of teaching delivery, material and quality of learning. In the present research, the TESL module taught to year two students in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, British University in Egypt (BUE) will be evaluated reflexively by the students and teachers. The module was taught to students in two different specialisms. It was taught and delivered through collaborative teaching and was evaluated by both teachers and students as very successful and enjoyable. The reflections of both teachers and students as well as student results confirm that it was a success.
  • Online Graduate Students’ Perspective on Engagement in Active Learning in the United States
    Authors: Ehi E. Aimiuwu, Keywords: Class facilitation, course management, online teaching, online education, student engagement. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3566439 Abstract: As of 2017, many researchers in educational journals are still wondering if students are effectively and efficiently engaged in active learning in the online learning environment. The goal of this qualitative single case study and narrative research is to explore if students are actively engaged in their online learning. Seven online students in the United States from LinkedIn and residencies were interviewed for this study. Eleven online learning techniques from research were used as a framework.  Data collection tools were used for the study that included a digital audiotape, observation sheet, interview protocol, transcription, and NVivo 12 Plus qualitative software.  Data analysis process, member checking, and key themes were used to reach saturation. About 85.7% of students preferred individual grading. About 71.4% of students valued professor’s interacting 2-3 times weekly, participating through posts and responses, having good internet access, and using email.  Also, about 57.1% said students log in 2-3 times weekly to daily, professor’s social presence helps, regular punctuality in work submission, and prefer assessments style of research, essay, and case study.  About 42.9% appreciated syllabus usefulness and professor’s expertise.
  • Influence of Instructors in Engaging Online Graduate Students in Active Learning in the United States
    Authors: Ehi E. Aimiuwu, Keywords: Class facilitation, class management, online teaching, online education, pedagogy. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3566373 Abstract: As of 2017, many online learning professionals, institutions, and journals are still wondering how instructors can keep student engaged in the online learning environment to facilitate active learning effectively. The purpose of this qualitative single-case and narrative research is to explore whether online professors understand their role as mentors and facilitators of students’ academic success by keeping students engaged in active learning based on personalized experience in the field. Data collection tools that were used in the study included an NVivo 12 Plus qualitative software, an interview protocol, a digital audiotape, an observation sheet, and a transcription. Seven online professors in the United States from LinkedIn and residencies were interviewed for this study. Eleven online teaching techniques from previous research were used as the study framework. Data analysis process, member checking, and key themes were used to achieve saturation. About 85.7% of professors agreed on rubric as the preferred online grading technique. About 57.1% agreed on professors logging in daily, students logging in about 2-5 times weekly, knowing students to increase accountability, email as preferred communication tool, and computer access for adequate online learning. About 42.9% agreed on syllabus for clear class expectations, participation to show what has been learned, and energizing students for creativity.
  • Development of a Small-Group Teaching Method for Enhancing the Learning of Basic Acupuncture Manipulation Optimized with the Theory of Motor Learning
    Authors: Wen-Chao Tang, Tang-Yi Liu, Ming Gao, Gang Xu, Hua-Yuan Yang, Keywords: Acupuncture, group teaching, video instruction, observational learning, external focus, summary feedback. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: This study developed a method for teaching acupuncture manipulation in small groups optimized with the theory of motor learning. Sixty acupuncture students and their teacher participated in our research. Motion videos were recorded of their manipulations using the lifting-thrusting method. These videos were analyzed using Simi Motion software to acquire the movement parameters of the thumb tip. The parameter velocity curves along Y axis was used to generate small teaching groups clustered by a self-organized map (SOM) and K-means. Ten groups were generated. All the targeted instruction based on the comparative results groups as well as the videos of teacher and student was provided to the members of each group respectively. According to the theory and research of motor learning, the factors or technologies such as video instruction, observational learning, external focus and summary feedback were integrated into this teaching method. Such efforts were desired to improve and enhance the effectiveness of current acupuncture teaching methods in limited classroom teaching time and extracurricular training.
  • How Children Synchronize with Their Teacher: Evidence from a Real-World Elementary School Classroom
    Authors: Reiko Yamamoto, Keywords: Movement synchrony, teacher–child relationships, English as a foreign language, EFL learning. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: This paper reports on how synchrony occurs between children and their teacher, and what prevents or facilitates synchrony. The aim of the experiment conducted in this study was to precisely analyze their movements and synchrony and reveal the process of synchrony in a real-world classroom. Specifically, the experiment was conducted for around 20 minutes during an English as a foreign language (EFL) lesson. The participants were 11 fourth-grade school children and their classroom teacher in a public elementary school in Japan. Previous researchers assert that synchrony causes the state of flow in a class. For checking the level of flow, Short Flow State Scale (SFSS) was adopted. The experimental procedure had four steps: 1) The teacher read aloud the first half of an English storybook to the children. Both the teacher and the children were at their own desks. 2) The children were subjected to an SFSS check. 3) The teacher read aloud the remaining half of the storybook to the children. She made the children remove their desks before reading. 4) The children were again subjected to an SFSS check. The movements of all participants were recorded with a video camera. From the movement analysis, it was found that the children synchronized better with the teacher in Step 3 than in Step 1, and that the teacher’s movement became free and outstanding without a desk. This implies that the desk acted as a barrier between the children and the teacher. Removal of this barrier resulted in the children’s reactions becoming synchronized with those of the teacher. The SFSS results proved that the children experienced more flow without a barrier than with a barrier. Apparently, synchrony is what caused flow or social emotions in the classroom. The main conclusion is that synchrony leads to cognitive outcomes such as children’s academic performance in EFL learning.