ONLINE LEARNING CONFERENCE


Online Learning Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Online Learning is a conference track under the Education Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Education.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Education).

Online Learning is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Online Learning Conference Track will be held at “Education Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2020” - “Education Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2020” - “Education Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2020” - “Education Conference in Paris, France in July 2020” - “Education Conference in New York, United States in August 2020” - “Education Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2020” - “Education Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Education Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2020” - “Education Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2020” - “Education Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2020” - “Education Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2020” - “Education Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2020” - “Education Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” .

Online Learning is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

VII. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

VIII. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 01, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20EDC05TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

IX. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 06, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20EDC06US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

X. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

XI. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline July 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20EDC08US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XII. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20EDC09JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIII. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20EDC09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIV. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 22, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20EDC10ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XV. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20EDC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVI. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20EDC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVII. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20EDC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20EDC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIX. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20EDC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder
FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

II. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

JUNE 26 - 27, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

V. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

FINISHED

VI. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

Education Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Online Learning Conference"

  • Investigation of Learning Challenges in Building Measurement Unit
    Authors: Argaw T. Gurmu, Muhammad N. Mahmood, Keywords: Building measurement, construction management, learning challenges, evaluate survey. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The objective of this research is to identify the architecture and construction management students’ learning challenges of the building measurement. This research used the survey data obtained collected from the students who completed the building measurement unit. NVivo qualitative data analysis software was used to identify relevant themes. The analysis of the qualitative data revealed the major learning difficulties such as inadequacy of practice questions for the examination, inability to work as a team, lack of detailed understanding of the prerequisite units, insufficiency of the time allocated for tutorials and incompatibility of lecture and tutorial schedules. The output of this research can be used as a basis for improving the teaching and learning activities in construction measurement units.
  • Training Undergraduate Engineering Students in Robotics and Automation through Model-Based Design Training: A Case Study at Assumption University of Thailand
    Authors: Sajed A. Habib, Keywords: Automation, industry 4.0, model-based design training, problem-based learning. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Problem-based learning (PBL) is a student-centered pedagogy that originated in the medical field and has also been used extensively in other knowledge disciplines with recognized advantages and limitations. PBL has been used in various undergraduate engineering programs with mixed outcomes. The current fourth industrial revolution (digital era or Industry 4.0) has made it essential for many science and engineering students to receive effective training in advanced courses such as industrial automation and robotics. This paper presents a case study at Assumption University of Thailand, where a PBL-like approach was used to teach some aspects of automation and robotics to selected groups of undergraduate engineering students. These students were given some basic level training in automation prior to participating in a subsequent training session in order to solve technical problems with increased complexity. The participating students’ evaluation of the training sessions in terms of learning effectiveness, skills enhancement, and incremental knowledge following the problem-solving session was captured through a follow-up survey consisting of 14 questions and a 5-point scoring system. From the most recent training event, an overall 70% of the respondents indicated that their skill levels were enhanced to a much greater level than they had had before the training, whereas 60.4% of the respondents from the same event indicated that their incremental knowledge following the session was much greater than what they had prior to the training. The instructor-facilitator involved in the training events suggested that this method of learning was more suitable for senior/advanced level students than those at the freshmen level as certain skills to effectively participate in such problem-solving sessions are acquired over a period of time, and not instantly.
  • Learning Programming for Hearing Impaired Students via an Avatar
    Authors: Nihal Esam Abuzinadah, Areej Abbas Malibari, Arwa Abdulaziz Allinjawi, Paul Krause, Keywords: Hearing-impaired students, isolation, self-esteem, learning difficulties. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Deaf and hearing-impaired students face many obstacles throughout their education, especially with learning applied sciences such as computer programming. In addition, there is no clear signs in the Arabic Sign Language that can be used to identify programming logic terminologies such as while, for, case, switch etc. However, hearing disabilities should not be a barrier for studying purpose nowadays, especially with the rapid growth in educational technology. In this paper, we develop an Avatar based system to teach computer programming to deaf and hearing-impaired students using Arabic Signed language with new signs vocabulary that is been developed for computer programming education. The system is tested on a number of high school students and results showed the importance of visualization in increasing the comprehension or understanding of concepts for deaf students through the avatar.
  • Collaborative Reflexive/Reflective Teaching and Action Research in TESL
    Authors: O. F. Elkommos, Keywords: Action research, addressing differentiation, collaborative teaching, reflective teaching and learning, reflexive learning, reflexive teaching, self-development, self-evaluation, TESL. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) has become a very rich area of research. Practitioners or teachers of English as a foreign or a second language are now promoting both collaborative learning and collaborative teaching. Students learning a language collaboratively and cooperatively are learning in a better environment of team work where they learn from each other. Further, teaching English collaboratively also creates an enriching environment that is also very enriching to students’ and teachers’ experiences of learning and teaching. Moreover, action research stems from actual teacher concerns and students’ needs. Reflection in turn, on the experience of the material taught and the delivery of material is becoming an integral part of the teaching and learning experience self- evaluation and self-development. In this case, the concern of the research field in the area of TESL will be the development of teaching delivery, material and quality of learning. In the present research, the TESL module taught to year two students in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, British University in Egypt (BUE) will be evaluated reflexively by the students and teachers. The module was taught to students in two different specialisms. It was taught and delivered through collaborative teaching and was evaluated by both teachers and students as very successful and enjoyable. The reflections of both teachers and students as well as student results confirm that it was a success.
  • The Current Status of Middle Class Internet Use in China: An Analysis Based on the Chinese General Social Survey 2015 Data and Semi-Structured Investigation
    Authors: Abigail Qian Zhou, Keywords: China, internet use, middle class, network behavior, online marketing. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: In today's China, the well-educated middle class, with stable jobs and above-average income, are the driving force behind its Internet society. Through the analysis of data from the 2015 Chinese General Social Survey and 50 interviewees, this study investigates the current situation of this group’s specific internet usage. The findings of this study demonstrate that daily life among the members of this socioeconomic group is closely tied to the Internet. For Chinese middle class, the Internet is used to socialize and entertain self and others. It is also used to search for and share information as well as to build their identities. The empirical results of this study will provide a reference, supported by factual data, for enterprises seeking to target the Chinese middle class through online marketing efforts.
  • Online Graduate Students’ Perspective on Engagement in Active Learning in the United States
    Authors: Ehi E. Aimiuwu, Keywords: Class facilitation, course management, online teaching, online education, student engagement. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3566439 Abstract: As of 2017, many researchers in educational journals are still wondering if students are effectively and efficiently engaged in active learning in the online learning environment. The goal of this qualitative single case study and narrative research is to explore if students are actively engaged in their online learning. Seven online students in the United States from LinkedIn and residencies were interviewed for this study. Eleven online learning techniques from research were used as a framework.  Data collection tools were used for the study that included a digital audiotape, observation sheet, interview protocol, transcription, and NVivo 12 Plus qualitative software.  Data analysis process, member checking, and key themes were used to reach saturation. About 85.7% of students preferred individual grading. About 71.4% of students valued professor’s interacting 2-3 times weekly, participating through posts and responses, having good internet access, and using email.  Also, about 57.1% said students log in 2-3 times weekly to daily, professor’s social presence helps, regular punctuality in work submission, and prefer assessments style of research, essay, and case study.  About 42.9% appreciated syllabus usefulness and professor’s expertise.
  • Influence of Instructors in Engaging Online Graduate Students in Active Learning in the United States
    Authors: Ehi E. Aimiuwu, Keywords: Class facilitation, class management, online teaching, online education, pedagogy. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3566373 Abstract: As of 2017, many online learning professionals, institutions, and journals are still wondering how instructors can keep student engaged in the online learning environment to facilitate active learning effectively. The purpose of this qualitative single-case and narrative research is to explore whether online professors understand their role as mentors and facilitators of students’ academic success by keeping students engaged in active learning based on personalized experience in the field. Data collection tools that were used in the study included an NVivo 12 Plus qualitative software, an interview protocol, a digital audiotape, an observation sheet, and a transcription. Seven online professors in the United States from LinkedIn and residencies were interviewed for this study. Eleven online teaching techniques from previous research were used as the study framework. Data analysis process, member checking, and key themes were used to achieve saturation. About 85.7% of professors agreed on rubric as the preferred online grading technique. About 57.1% agreed on professors logging in daily, students logging in about 2-5 times weekly, knowing students to increase accountability, email as preferred communication tool, and computer access for adequate online learning. About 42.9% agreed on syllabus for clear class expectations, participation to show what has been learned, and energizing students for creativity.
  • Development of a Small-Group Teaching Method for Enhancing the Learning of Basic Acupuncture Manipulation Optimized with the Theory of Motor Learning
    Authors: Wen-Chao Tang, Tang-Yi Liu, Ming Gao, Gang Xu, Hua-Yuan Yang, Keywords: Acupuncture, group teaching, video instruction, observational learning, external focus, summary feedback. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: This study developed a method for teaching acupuncture manipulation in small groups optimized with the theory of motor learning. Sixty acupuncture students and their teacher participated in our research. Motion videos were recorded of their manipulations using the lifting-thrusting method. These videos were analyzed using Simi Motion software to acquire the movement parameters of the thumb tip. The parameter velocity curves along Y axis was used to generate small teaching groups clustered by a self-organized map (SOM) and K-means. Ten groups were generated. All the targeted instruction based on the comparative results groups as well as the videos of teacher and student was provided to the members of each group respectively. According to the theory and research of motor learning, the factors or technologies such as video instruction, observational learning, external focus and summary feedback were integrated into this teaching method. Such efforts were desired to improve and enhance the effectiveness of current acupuncture teaching methods in limited classroom teaching time and extracurricular training.
  • The Use of Webquests in Developing Inquiry Based Learning: Views of Teachers and Students in Qatar
    Authors: Abdullah Abu-Tineh, Carol Murphy, Nigel Calder, Nasser Mansour, Keywords: Digital technology, inquiry-based learning, mathematics and science education, professional development. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: This paper reports on an aspect of e-learning in developing inquiry-based learning (IBL). We present data on the views of teachers and students in Qatar following a professional development programme intended to help teachers implement IBL in their science and mathematics classrooms. Key to this programme was the use of WebQuests. Views of the teachers and students suggested that WebQuests helped students to develop technical skills, work collaboratively and become independent in their learning. The use of WebQuests also enabled a combination of digital and non-digital tools that helped students connect ideas and enhance their understanding of topics.
  • Investigating Iraqi EFL Undergraduates' Performance in the Production of Number Forms in English
    Authors: Adnan Z. Mkhelif, Keywords: L2 morphology, L2 number forms, L2 vocabulary learning, productive knowledge. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The production of number forms in English tends to be problematic for Iraqi learners of English as a foreign language (EFL), even at the undergraduate level. To help better understand and consequently address this problem, it is important to identify its sources. This study aims at: (1) statistically analysing Iraqi EFL undergraduates' performance in the production of number forms in English; (2) classifying learners' errors in terms of their possible major causes; and (3) outlining some pedagogical recommendations relevant to the teaching of number forms in English. It is hypothesized in this study that (1) Iraqi EFL undergraduates still face problems in the production of number forms in English and (2) errors pertaining to the context of learning are more numerous than those attributable to the other possible causes. After reviewing the literature available on the topic, a written test comprising 50 items has been constructed and administered to a randomly chosen sample of 50 second-year college students from the Department of English, College of Education, Wasit University. The findings of the study showed that Iraqi EFL undergraduates still face problems in the production of number forms in English and that the possible major sources of learners’ errors can be arranged hierarchically in terms of the percentages of errors to which they can be ascribed as follows: (1) context of learning (50%), (2) intralingual transfer (37%), and (3) interlingual transfer (13%). It is hoped that the implications of the study findings will be beneficial to researchers, syllabus designers, as well as teachers of English as a foreign/second language.