DIGITAL LEARNING CONFERENCE


Digital Learning Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Digital Learning is a conference track under the Education Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Education.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Education).

Digital Learning is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Digital Learning Conference Track will be held at “Education Conference in New York, United States in August 2020” - “Education Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2020” - “Education Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Education Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2020” - “Education Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2020” - “Education Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2020” - “Education Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2020” - “Education Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2020” - “Education Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” - “Education Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2021” - “Education Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2021” - “Education Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2021” - “Education Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2021” - “Education Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2021” - “Education Conference in Paris, France in July 2021” - “Education Conference in New York, United States in August 2021” - “Education Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2021” - “Education Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2021” - “Education Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2021” - “Education Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2021” - “Education Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2021” - “Education Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2021” - “Education Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2021” - “Education Conference in Paris, France in December 2021” .

Digital Learning is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

XI. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

XII. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

XIII. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

XIV. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

XV. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

XVI. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

XVII. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

XIX. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

XX. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline August 13, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline August 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline January 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21EDC02GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XX. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline August 13, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline August 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline January 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21EDC02GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXI. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline August 13, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline August 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline March 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21EDC04ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXII. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline August 13, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline August 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 01, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21EDC05TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIII. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline August 13, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline August 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 06, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21EDC06US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIV. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline August 13, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline August 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline June 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21EDC07FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXV. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2021
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline August 13, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline August 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline July 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21EDC08US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVI. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2021
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline August 13, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline August 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21EDC09JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVII. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2021
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline August 13, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline August 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21EDC09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVIII. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline August 13, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline August 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 22, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21EDC10ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIX. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline August 13, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline August 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21EDC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXX. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline August 13, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline August 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21EDC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXI. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2021
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline August 13, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline August 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21EDC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXII. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2021
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline August 13, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline August 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21EDC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXIII. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline August 13, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline August 27, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21EDC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder
FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

II. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

JUNE 26 - 27, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

V. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

FINISHED

VI. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

VII. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

VIII. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

IX. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

X. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

Education Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Digital Learning Conference"

  • Tibyan Automated Arabic Correction Using Machine-Learning in Detecting Syntactical Mistakes
    Authors: Ashwag O. Maghraby, Nida N. Khan, Hosnia A. Ahmed, Ghufran N. Brohi, Hind F. Assouli, Jawaher S. Melibari, Keywords: Arabic Language acquisition and learning, natural language processing, morphological analyzer, part-of-speech. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The Arabic language is one of the most important languages. Learning it is so important for many people around the world because of its religious and economic importance and the real challenge lies in practicing it without grammatical or syntactical mistakes. This research focused on detecting and correcting the syntactic mistakes of Arabic syntax according to their position in the sentence and focused on two of the main syntactical rules in Arabic: Dual and Plural. It analyzes each sentence in the text, using Stanford CoreNLP morphological analyzer and machine-learning approach in order to detect the syntactical mistakes and then correct it. A prototype of the proposed system was implemented and evaluated. It uses support vector machine (SVM) algorithm to detect Arabic grammatical errors and correct them using the rule-based approach. The prototype system has a far accuracy 81%. In general, it shows a set of useful grammatical suggestions that the user may forget about while writing due to lack of familiarity with grammar or as a result of the speed of writing such as alerting the user when using a plural term to indicate one person.
  • Impact of VARK Learning Model at Tertiary Level Education
    Authors: Munazza A. Mirza, Khawar Khurshid, Keywords: Learning style, VARK, sensory preferences, identification model, didactic practices. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Individuals are generally associated with different learning styles, which have been explored extensively in recent past. The learning styles refer to the potential of an individual by which s/he can easily comprehend and retain information. Among various learning style models, VARK is the most accepted model which categorizes the learners with respect to their sensory characteristics. Based on the number of preferred learning modes, the learners can be categorized as uni-modal, bi-modal, tri-modal, or quad/multi-modal. Although there is a prevalent belief in the learning styles, however, the model is not being frequently and effectively utilized in the higher education. This research describes the identification model to validate teacher’s didactic practice and student’s performance linkage with the learning styles. The identification model is recommended to check the effective application and evaluation of the various learning styles. The proposed model is a guideline to effectively implement learning styles inventory in order to ensure that it will validate performance linkage with learning styles. If performance is linked with learning styles, this may help eradicate the distrust on learning style theory. For this purpose, a comprehensive study was conducted to compare and understand how VARK inventory model is being used to identify learning preferences and their correlation with learner’s performance. A comparative analysis of the findings of these studies is presented to understand the learning styles of tertiary students in various disciplines. It is concluded with confidence that the learning styles of students cannot be associated with any specific discipline. Furthermore, there is not enough empirical proof to link performance with learning styles.
  • Curriculum Based Measurement and Precision Teaching in Writing Empowerment Enhancement: Results from an Italian Learning Center
    Authors: I. Pelizzoni, C. Cavallini, I. Salvaderi, F. Cavallini, Keywords: Precision teaching, writing skills, CBM, Italian Learning Center. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: We present the improvement in writing skills obtained by 94 participants (aged between six and 10 years) with special educational needs through a writing enhancement program based on fluency principles. The study was planned and conducted with a single-subject experimental plan for each of the participants, in order to confirm the results in the literature. These results were obtained using precision teaching (PT) methodology to increase the number of written graphemes per minute in the pre- and post-test, by curriculum based measurement (CBM). Results indicated an increase in the number of written graphemes for all participants. The average overall duration of the intervention is 144 minutes in five months of treatment. These considerations have been analyzed taking account of the complexity of the implementation of measurement systems in real operational contexts (an Italian learning center) and important aspects of replicability and cost-effectiveness of such interventions.
  • Evaluating the Effectiveness of Electronic Response Systems in Technology-Oriented Classes
    Authors: Ahmad Salman, Keywords: Interactive learning, classroom technology, electronic response systems, polling applications, learning evaluation. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Electronic Response Systems such as Kahoot, Poll Everywhere, and Google Classroom are gaining a lot of popularity when surveying audiences in events, meetings, and classroom. The reason is mainly because of the ease of use and the convenience these tools bring since they provide mobile applications with a simple user interface. In this paper, we present a case study on the effectiveness of using Electronic Response Systems on student participation and learning experience in a classroom. We use a polling application for class exercises in two different technology-oriented classes. We evaluate the effectiveness of the usage of the polling applications through statistical analysis of the students performance in these two classes and compare them to the performances of students who took the same classes without using the polling application for class participation. Our results show an increase in the performances of the students who used the Electronic Response System when compared to those who did not by an average of 11%.
  • Implementation of the Quality Management System and Development of Organizational Learning: Case of Three Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises in Morocco
    Authors: Abdelghani Boudiaf, Keywords: Changing mentalities, continuous training, organizational learning, quality management system, skills development. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The profusion of studies relating to the concept of organizational learning shows the importance that has been given to this concept in the management sciences. A few years ago, companies leaned towards ISO 9001 certification; this requires the implementation of the quality management system (QMS). In order for this objective to be achieved, companies must have a set of skills, which pushes them to develop learning through continuous training. The results of empirical research have shown that implementation of the QMS in the company promotes the development of learning. It should also be noted that several types of learning are developed in this sense. Given the nature of skills development is normative in the context of the quality demarche, companies are obliged to qualify and improve the skills of their human resources. Continuous training is the keystone to develop the necessary learning. To carry out continuous training, companies need to be able to identify their real needs by developing training plans based on well-defined engineering. The training process goes obviously through several stages. Initially, training has a general aspect, that is to say, it focuses on topics and actions of a general nature. Subsequently, this is done in a more targeted and more precise way to accompany the evolution of the QMS and also to make the changes decided each time (change of working method, change of practices, change of objectives, change of mentality, etc.). To answer our problematic we opted for the method of qualitative research. It should be noted that the case study method crosses several data collection techniques to explain and understand a phenomenon. Three cases of companies were studied as part of this research work using different data collection techniques related to this method.
  • Challenges and Professional Perspectives for Pedagogy Undergraduates with Specific Learning Disability: A Greek Case Study
    Authors: Tatiani D. Mousoura, Keywords: Specific learning disability, dyslexia, pedagogy department, inclusion, professional role of SLDed educators, higher education, university policy. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Specific learning disability (SLD) in higher education has been partially explored in Greece so far. Moreover, opinions on professional perspectives for university students with SLD, is scarcely encountered in Greek research. The perceptions of the hidden character of SLD along with the university policy towards it and professional perspectives that result from this policy have been examined in the present research. This study has applied the paradigm of a Greek Tertiary Pedagogical Education Department (Early Childhood Education). Via mixed methods, data have been collected from different groups of people in the Pedagogical Department: students with SLD and without SLD, academic staff and administration staff, all of which offer the opportunity for triangulation of the findings. Qualitative methods include ten interviews with students with SLD and 15 interviews with academic staff and 60 hours of observation of the students with SLD. Quantitative methods include 165 questionnaires completed by third and fourth-year students and five questionnaires completed by the administration staff. Thematic analyses of the interviews’ data and descriptive statistics on the questionnaires’ data have been applied for the processing of the results. The use of medical terms to define and understand SLD was common in the student cohort, regardless of them having an SLD diagnosis. However, this medical model approach is far more dominant in the group of students without SLD who, by majority, hold misconceptions on a definitional level. The academic staff group seems to be leaning towards a social approach concerning SLD. According to them, diagnoses may lead to social exclusion. The Pedagogical Department generally endorses the principles of inclusion and complies with the provision of oral exams for students with SLD. Nevertheless, in practice, there seems to be a lack of regular academic support for these students. When such support does exist, it is only through individual initiatives. With regards to their prospective profession, students with SLD can utilize their personal experience, as well as their empathy; these appear to be unique weapons in their hands –in comparison with other educators− when it comes to teaching students in the future. In the Department of Pedagogy, provision towards SLD results sporadic, however the vision of an inclusive department does exist. Based on their studies and their experience, pedagogy students with SLD claim that they have an experiential internalized advantage for their future career as educators.
  • Blended Learning through Google Classroom
    Authors: Lee Bih Ni, Keywords: Blended learning, learning app, Google classroom, schools. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: This paper discusses that good learning involves all academic groups in the school. Blended learning is learning outside the classroom. Google Classroom is a free service learning app for schools, non-profit organizations and anyone with a personal Google account. Facilities accessed through computers and mobile phones are very useful for school teachers and students. Blended learning classrooms using both traditional and technology-based methods for teaching have become the norm for many educators. Using Google Classroom gives students access to online learning. Even if the teacher is not in the classroom, the teacher can provide learning. This is the supervision of the form of the teacher when the student is outside the school.
  • A Neuroscience-Based Learning Technique: Framework and Application to STEM
    Authors: Dante J. Dorantes-González, Aldrin Balsa-Yepes, Keywords: Emotion, emotion-enhanced memory, learning technique, STEM. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Existing learning techniques such as problem-based learning, project-based learning, or case study learning are learning techniques that focus mainly on technical details, but give no specific guidelines on learner’s experience and emotional learning aspects such as arousal salience and valence, being emotional states important factors affecting engagement and retention. Some approaches involving emotion in educational settings, such as social and emotional learning, lack neuroscientific rigorousness and use of specific neurobiological mechanisms. On the other hand, neurobiology approaches lack educational applicability. And educational approaches mainly focus on cognitive aspects and disregard conditioning learning. First, authors start explaining the reasons why it is hard to learn thoughtfully, then they use the method of neurobiological mapping to track the main limbic system functions, such as the reward circuit, and its relations with perception, memories, motivations, sympathetic and parasympathetic reactions, and sensations, as well as the brain cortex. The authors conclude explaining the major finding: The mechanisms of nonconscious learning and the triggers that guarantee long-term memory potentiation. Afterward, the educational framework for practical application and the instructors’ guidelines are established. An implementation example in engineering education is given, namely, the study of tuned-mass dampers for earthquake oscillations attenuation in skyscrapers. This work represents an original learning technique based on nonconscious learning mechanisms to enhance long-term memories that complement existing cognitive learning methods.
  • Building a Transformative Continuing Professional Development Experience for Educators through a Principle-Based, Technological-Driven Knowledge Building Approach: A Case Study of a Professional Learning Team in Secondary Education
    Authors: Melvin Chan, Chew Lee Teo, Keywords: Continual professional development, knowledge building, learning paradigm, andragogy. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: There has been a growing emphasis in elevating the teachers’ proficiency and competencies through continuing professional development (CPD) opportunities. In this era of a Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous (VUCA) world, teachers are expected to be collaborative designers, critical thinkers and creative builders. However, many of the CPD structures are still revolving in the model of transmission, which stands in contradiction to the cultivation of future-ready teachers for the innovative world of emerging technologies. This article puts forward the framing of CPD through a Principle-Based, Technological-Driven Knowledge Building Approach grounded in the essence of andragogy and progressive learning theories where growth is best exemplified through an authentic immersion in a social/community experience-based setting. Putting this Knowledge Building Professional Development Model (KBPDM) in operation via a Professional Learning Team (PLT) situated in a Secondary School in Singapore, research findings reveal that the intervention has led to a fundamental change in the learning paradigm of the teachers, henceforth equipping and empowering them successfully in their pedagogical design and practices for a 21st century classroom experience. This article concludes with the possibility in leveraging the Learning Analytics to deepen the CPD experiences for educators.
  • Investigation of Learning Challenges in Building Measurement Unit
    Authors: Argaw T. Gurmu, Muhammad N. Mahmood, Keywords: Building measurement, construction management, learning challenges, evaluate survey. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: The objective of this research is to identify the architecture and construction management students’ learning challenges of the building measurement. This research used the survey data obtained collected from the students who completed the building measurement unit. NVivo qualitative data analysis software was used to identify relevant themes. The analysis of the qualitative data revealed the major learning difficulties such as inadequacy of practice questions for the examination, inability to work as a team, lack of detailed understanding of the prerequisite units, insufficiency of the time allocated for tutorials and incompatibility of lecture and tutorial schedules. The output of this research can be used as a basis for improving the teaching and learning activities in construction measurement units.