APPLIED FINANCE CONFERENCE


Applied Finance Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Applied Finance is a conference track under the Economics Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Economics.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Economics).

Applied Finance is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Applied Finance Conference Track will be held at “Economics Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2020” - “Economics Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2020” - “Economics Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2020” - “Economics Conference in Paris, France in July 2020” - “Economics Conference in New York, United States in August 2020” - “Economics Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2020” - “Economics Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Economics Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2020” - “Economics Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2020” - “Economics Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2020” - “Economics Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2020” - “Economics Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2020” - “Economics Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” - “Economics Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” .

Applied Finance is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

VII. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

VIII. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 01, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20ECC05TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

IX. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 06, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20ECC06US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

X. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

XI. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline July 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20ECC08US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XII. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20ECC09JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIII. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20ECC09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIV. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 22, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20ECC10ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XV. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20ECC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVI. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20ECC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVII. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20ECC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20ECC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIX. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20ECC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIX. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 27, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 12, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20ECC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder
FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

II. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

JUNE 26 - 27, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

V. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

FINISHED

VI. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

Economics Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Applied Finance Conference"

  • A Study to Assess the Employment Ambitions of Graduating Students from College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Authors: J. George, M. Al Mutairi, W. Aljuryyad, A. Alhussanan, A. Alkashan, T. Aldoghiri, Z. Alamari, A. Albakr, Keywords: College of Applied Medical Sciences, employment ambitions, graduating students, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3566367 Abstract: Introduction: Students make plans for their career and are keen in exploring options of employment in those carriers. They make their employment choice based on their desires and preferences. This study aims to identify if students of King Saud Bin Abdulaziz for Health Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences after obtaining appropriate education prefer to work as clinicians, university faculty, or full-time researchers. There are limited studies in Saudi Arabia exploring the university student’s employment choices and preferences. This study would help employers to build the required job positions and prevent misleading employers from opening undesired positions in the job market. Methodology: The study included 394 students from third and fourth years both male and female among the eighth programs of college of applied medical sciences, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences (KSAU-HS), Riyadh campus. A prospective quantitative cross-sectional study was conducted; data were collected by distributing a seven item questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS. Results: Among the participants, 358 (90.9%) of them chose one of the three listed career choices, 263 (66.8%) decided to work as hospital staff after their education, 75 students (19.0%) chose to work as a faculty member in a university after obtaining appropriate degree, 20 students (5.1%) preferred to work as full-time researcher after obtaining appropriate degree, the remaining 36 students (9.1%) had different career goals, such as obtaining a master degree after graduating, to obtain a bachelor of medicine and bachelor in surgery degree, and working in the private sector. The most recurrent reason behind the participants' choice was "career goal", where 276 (70.1%) chose it as a reason. Conclusion: The findings of the study showed that most student’s preferred to work in hospitals as clinicians, followed by choice of working as a faculty in a university, the least choice was to be working as full-time researchers.
  • Semantic Preference across Research Articles: A Corpus-Based Study of Adjectives in English
    Authors: Valdênia Carvalho e Almeida, Keywords: Applied linguistics, corpus linguistics, chemistry, research article, semantic preference. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3298862 Abstract: The goal of the present study is to investigate the semantic preference of the most frequent adjectives in research articles through a corpus-based analysis of texts published in journals in Applied Linguistics (AL). The corpus used in this study contains texts published in the period from 2014 to 2018 in the three journals: Language Learning and Technology; English for Academic Purposes, and TESOL Quaterly, totaling more than one million words. A corpus-based analysis was carried out on the corpus to identify the most frequent adjectives that co-occurred in the three journals. By observing the concordance lines of the adjectives and analyzing the words they associated with, the semantic preferences of each adjective were determined. Later, the AL corpus analysis was compared to the investigation of the same adjectives in a corpus of Chemistry. This second part of the study aimed to identify possible differences and similarities between the two corpora in relation to the use of the adjectives in research articles from both areas. The results show that there are some preferences which seem to be closely related not only to the academic genre of the texts but also to the specific domain of the discipline and, to a lesser extent, to the context of research in each journal. This research illustrates a possible contribution of Corpus Linguistics to explore the concept of semantic preference in more detail, considering the complex nature of the phenomenon.
  • Collaborative Stylistic Group Project: A Drama Practical Analysis Application
    Authors: Omnia F. Elkommos, Keywords: Applied linguistic theories, collaborative learning, cooperative principle, discourse analysis, drama analysis, group project, online acting performance, pragmatics, speech act theory, stylistics, technology enhanced learning. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.3298817 Abstract: In the course of teaching stylistics to undergraduate students of the Department of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, the linguistic tool kit of theories comes in handy and useful for the better understanding of the different literary genres: Poetry, drama, and short stories. In the present paper, a model of teaching of stylistics is compiled and suggested. It is a collaborative group project technique for use in the undergraduate diverse specialisms (Literature, Linguistics and Translation tracks) class. Students initially are introduced to the different linguistic tools and theories suitable for each literary genre. The second step is to apply these linguistic tools to texts. Students are required to watch videos performing the poems or play, for example, and search the net for interpretations of the texts by other authorities. They should be using a template (prepared by the researcher) that has guided questions leading students along in their analysis. Finally, a practical analysis would be written up using the practical analysis essay template (also prepared by the researcher). As per collaborative learning, all the steps include activities that are student-centered addressing differentiation and considering their three different specialisms. In the process of selecting the proper tools, the actual application and analysis discussion, students are given tasks that request their collaboration. They also work in small groups and the groups collaborate in seminars and group discussions. At the end of the course/module, students present their work also collaboratively and reflect and comment on their learning experience. The module/course uses a drama play that lends itself to the task: ‘The Bond’ by Amy Lowell and Robert Frost. The project results in an interpretation of its theme, characterization and plot. The linguistic tools are drawn from pragmatics, and discourse analysis among others.
  • Market Acceptance of a Murabaha-Based Finance Structure within a Social Network of Non-Islamic Small and Medium Enterprise Owners in African Procurement
    Authors: Craig M. Allen, Keywords: Africa, entrepreneurs, Islamic finance, market acceptance, Murabaha, SMEs. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2643888 Abstract: Twenty two African entrepreneurs with Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in a single social network centered around a non-Muslim population in a smaller African country, selected an Islamic financing structure, a form of Murabaha, based solely on market rationale. These entrepreneurs had all won procurement contracts from major purchasers of goods within their country and faced difficulty arranging traditional bank financing to support their supply-chain needs. The Murabaha-based structure satisfied their market-driven demand and provided an attractive alternative to the traditional bank-offered lending products. The Murabaha-styled trade-financing structure was not promoted with any religious implications, but solely as a market solution to the existing problems associated with bank-related financing. This indicates the strong market forces that draw SMEs to financing structures that are traditionally considered within the framework of Islamic finance.
  • Evaluating the Perception of Roma in Europe through Social Network Analysis
    Authors: Giulia I. Pintea, Keywords: Applied mathematics, oppression, Roma people, social network analysis. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1474823 Abstract: The Roma people are a nomadic ethnic group native to India, and they are one of the most prevalent minorities in Europe. In the past, Roma were enslaved and they were imprisoned in concentration camps during the Holocaust; today, Roma are subject to hate crimes and are denied access to healthcare, education, and proper housing. The aim of this project is to analyze how the public perception of the Roma people may be influenced by antiziganist and pro-Roma institutions in Europe. In order to carry out this project, we used social network analysis to build two large social networks: The antiziganist network, which is composed of institutions that oppress and racialize Roma, and the pro-Roma network, which is composed of institutions that advocate for and protect Roma rights. Measures of centrality, density, and modularity were obtained to determine which of the two social networks is exerting the greatest influence on the public’s perception of Roma in European societies. Furthermore, data on hate crimes on Roma were gathered from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). We analyzed the trends in hate crimes on Roma for several European countries for 2009-2015 in order to see whether or not there have been changes in the public’s perception of Roma, thus helping us evaluate which of the two social networks has been more influential. Overall, the results suggest that there is a greater and faster exchange of information in the pro-Roma network. However, when taking the hate crimes into account, the impact of the pro-Roma institutions is ambiguous, due to differing patterns among European countries, suggesting that the impact of the pro-Roma network is inconsistent. Despite antiziganist institutions having a slower flow of information, the hate crime patterns also suggest that the antiziganist network has a higher impact on certain countries, which may be due to institutions outside the political sphere boosting the spread of antiziganist ideas and information to the European public.
  • Ethical Finance and Islamic Finance: Particularities, Possible Convergence and Potential Development
    Authors: Safa Ougoujil, Sidi Mohamed Rigar, Keywords: Convergences, ethical finance, Islamic finance, potential development. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1340528 Abstract: Economics is not an exact science. It cannot be from the moment it is a social science that concerns society organization, a human science that depends on the behavior of the men and women who make a part of this society. Therefore, it cannot ignore morality, the instinctive sense of good and evil, the natural order which place us between certain values, and which religion often sheds light on. In terms of finance, the reference to ethics is becoming more popular than ever. This is naturally due to the growing financial crises. Finance is less and less ethical, but some financial practices have continued to do so. This is the case of ethical finance and Islamic finance. After attempting to define the concepts of ethical finance and Islamic finance, in a period when financial innovation seeks to encourage differentiation in order to create more profit margins, this article attempts to expose the particularities, the convergences and the potentialities of development of these two sensibilities.
  • Assessment-Assisted and Relationship-Based Financial Advising: Using an Empirical Assessment to Understand Personal Investor Risk Tolerance in Professional Advising Relationships
    Authors: Jerry Szatko, Edan L. Jorgensen, Stacia Jorgensen, Keywords: Behavior based advising, behavioral finance, financial advising, financial advisor tools, financial risk tolerance. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1316357 Abstract: A crucial component to the success of any financial advising relationship is for the financial professional to understand the perceptions, preferences and thought-processes carried by the financial clients they serve. Armed with this information, financial professionals are more quickly able to understand how they can tailor their approach to best match the individual preferences and needs of each personal investor. Our research explores the use of a quantitative assessment tool in the financial services industry to assist in the identification of the personal investor’s consumer behaviors, especially in terms of financial risk tolerance, as it relates to their financial decision making. Through this process, the Unitifi Consumer Insight Tool (UCIT) was created and refined to capture and categorize personal investor financial behavioral categories and the financial personality tendencies of individuals prior to the initiation of a financial advisement relationship. This paper discusses the use of this tool to place individuals in one of four behavior-based financial risk tolerance categories. Our discoveries and research were aided through administration of a web-based survey to a group of over 1,000 individuals. Our findings indicate that it is possible to use a quantitative assessment tool to assist in predicting the behavioral tendencies of personal consumers when faced with consumer financial risk and decisions.
  • Unmet English Needs of the Non-Engineering Staff: The Case of Algerian Hydrocarbon Industry
    Authors: N. Khiati, Keywords: English for specific purposes, ESP, legal and finance staff, needs analysis, unmet/unconscious needs, training implications. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1316303 Abstract: The present paper attempts to report on some findings that emerged out of a larger scale doctorate research into English language needs of a renowned Algerian company of Hydrocarbon industry. From a multifaceted English for specific purposes (ESP) research perspective, the paper considers the English needs of the finance/legal department staff in the midst of the conflicting needs perspectives involving both objective needs indicators (i.e., the pressure of globalised business) and the general negative attitudes among the administrative -mainly jurists- staff towards English (favouring a non-adaptation strategy). The researcher’s unearthing of the latter’s needs is an endeavour to concretise the concepts of unmet, or unconscious needs, among others. This is why, these initially uncovered hidden needs will be detailed questioning educational background, namely previous language of instruction; training experiences and expectations; as well as the actual communicative practices derived from the retrospective interviews and preliminary quantitative data of the questionnaire. Based on these rough clues suggesting real needs, the researcher will tentatively propose some implications for both pre-service and in-service training organisers as well as for educational policy makers in favour of an English course in legal English for the jurists mainly from pre-graduate phases to in-service training.
  • A Multi-Agent Smart E-Market Design at Work for Shariah Compliant Islamic Banking
    Authors: Wafa Ghonaim, Keywords: Islamic finance, Shariah compliance, smart electronic markets design, multi-agent systems. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1315553 Abstract: Though quite fast on growth, Islamic financing at large, and its diverse instruments, is a controversial matter among scholars. This is evident from the ongoing debates on its Shariah compliance. Arguments, however, are inciting doubts and concerns among clients about its credibility, which is harming this lucrative sector. The work here investigates, particularly, some issues related to the Tawarruq instrument. The work examines the issues of linking Murabaha and Wakala contracts, the reselling of commodities to same traders, and the transfer of ownerships. The work affirms that a multi-agent smart electronic market design would facilitate Shariah compliance. The smart market exploits the rational decision-making capabilities of autonomous proxy agents that enable the clients, traders, brokers, and the bank buy and sell commodities, and manage transactions and cash flow. The smart electronic market design delivers desirable qualities that terminate the need for Wakala contracts and the reselling of commodities to the same traders. It also resolves the ownership transfer issues by allowing stakeholders to trade independently. The bank administers the smart electronic market and assures reliability of trades, transactions and cash flow. A multi-agent simulation is presented to validate the concept and processes. We anticipate that the multi-agent smart electronic market design would deliver Shariah compliance of personal financing to the aspiration of scholars, banks, traders and potential clients.
  • Financial Decision-Making among Finance Students: An Empirical Study from the Czech Republic
    Authors: Barbora Chmelíková, Keywords: Financial decision-making, financial literacy, personal finance, university students. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1128125 Abstract: Making sound financial decisions is an essential skill which can have an impact on life of each consumer of financial products. The aim of this paper is to examine decision-making concerning financial matters and personal finance. The selected target group was university students majoring in finance related fields. The study was conducted in the Czech Republic at Masaryk University in 2015. In order to analyze financial decision-making questions related to basic finance decisions were developed to address the research objective. The results of the study suggest gaps in detecting best solutions to given financial decision-making questions among finance students. The analysis results indicate relation between financial decision-making and own experience with holding and using concrete financial products.