COURTS AND JUDICIAL POLITICS CONFERENCE


Courts and Judicial Politics Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Courts and Judicial Politics is a conference track under the Law Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Law.

internationalconference.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Law).

Courts and Judicial Politics is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Courts and Judicial Politics Conference Track will be held at “Law Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2020” - “Law Conference in Paris, France in July 2020” - “Law Conference in New York, United States in August 2020” - “Law Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2020” - “Law Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Law Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2020” - “Law Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2020” - “Law Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2020” - “Law Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2020” - “Law Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2020” - “Law Conference in Paris, France in December 2020” - “Law Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2021” - “Law Conference in London, United Kingdom in February 2021” - “Law Conference in Barcelona, Spain in April 2021” - “Law Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2021” - “Law Conference in San Francisco, United States in June 2021” - “Law Conference in Paris, France in July 2021” - “Law Conference in New York, United States in August 2021” - “Law Conference in Tokyo, Japan in September 2021” - “Law Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2021” - “Law Conference in Barcelona, Spain in October 2021” - “Law Conference in San Francisco, United States in November 2021” - “Law Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2021” - “Law Conference in Singapore, Singapore in November 2021” - “Law Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2021” - “Law Conference in Paris, France in December 2021” .

Courts and Judicial Politics is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

Final Call

IX. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

X. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

XI. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

XII. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

XIII. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

XIV. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

XV. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2020
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20LC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVI. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20LC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVII. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2020
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20LC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XVIII. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20LC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XIX. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2020
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20LC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XX. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline January 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21LC02GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XX. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2021
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline January 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21LC02GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXI. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline March 16, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21LC04ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXII. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 01, 2021
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21LC05TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIII. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

JUNE 05 - 06, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 06, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21LC06US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIV. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

JULY 20 - 21, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline June 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21LC07FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXV. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

AUGUST 10 - 11, 2021
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline July 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21LC08US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVI. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 10 - 11, 2021
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 10, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21LC09JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVII. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2021
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21LC09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXVIII. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2021
BARCELONA, SPAIN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline September 22, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21LC10ES
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXIX. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 02 - 03, 2021
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21LC11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXX. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 12 - 13, 2021
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21LC11TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXI. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2021
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 19, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21LC11SG
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXII. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 15 - 16, 2021
BANGKOK, THAILAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 17, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21LC12TH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

XXXIII. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 28 - 29, 2021
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline June 15, 2020
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline June 30, 2020
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline November 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 21LC12FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder
FINISHED

I. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

MARCH 19 - 20, 2019
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

FINISHED

II. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

JUNE 26 - 27, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

FINISHED

III. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

AUGUST 21 - 22, 2019
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

IV. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 08 - 09, 2019
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

FINISHED

V. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 12 - 13, 2019
ROME, ITALY

FINISHED

VI. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 13 - 14, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

FINISHED

VII. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

APRIL 15 - 16, 2020
BARCELONA, SPAIN

FINISHED

VIII. INTERNATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE

MAY 11 - 12, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

Law Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Courts and Judicial Politics Conference"

  • Countering Radicalization to Violent Extremism: A Comparative Study of Canada, the UK and South East Asia
    Authors: Daniel Alati, Keywords: Canada, United Kingdom, South East Asia, comparative law and politics, radicalization to violent extremism, terrorism. DOI:10.5281/zenodo. Abstract: Recent high-profile terrorist events in Canada, the United Kingdom and Europe – the London Bridge attacks, the terrorist attacks in Nice, France and Barcelona, Spain, the 2014 Ottawa Parliament attacks and the 2017 attacks in Edmonton – have all raised levels of public and academic concern with so-called “lone-wolf” and “radicalized” terrorism. Similarly, several countries outside of the “Western” world have been dealing with radicalization to violent extremism for several years. Many South East Asian countries, including Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and the Philippines have all had experience with what might be described as ISIS or extremist-inspired acts of terrorism. Indeed, it appears the greatest strength of groups such as ISIS has been their ability to spread a global message of violent extremism that has led to radicalization in markedly different jurisdictions throughout the world. These markedly different jurisdictions have responded with counter-radicalization strategies that warrant further comparative analysis. This paper utilizes an inter-disciplinary legal methodology. In doing so, it compares legal, political, cultural and historical aspects of the counter-radicalization strategies employed by Canada, the United Kingdom and several South East Asian countries (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and the Philippines). Whilst acknowledging significant legal and political differences between these jurisdictions, the paper engages in these analyses with an eye towards understanding which best practices might be shared between the jurisdictions. In doing so, it presents valuable findings of a comparative nature that are useful to both academic and practitioner audiences in several jurisdictions.
  • Governmentality and the Norwegian Knowledge Promotion Reform
    Authors: Christin Tønseth, Keywords: Education politics, governance, governmentality, the Norwegian knowledge promotion reform. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2643687 Abstract: The Norwegian ‘knowledge promotion reform’ was implemented in elementary schools and upper secondary schools in 2006. The goal of the reform was that all pupils should develop basic skills and competencies in order to take an active part in the knowledge society. This paper discusses how governmentality as a management principle is demonstrated through the Norwegian ‘knowledge promotion reform’. Evaluation reports and political documents are the basis for the discussion. The ‘knowledge promotion reform’ was including quality assurance for schools, teachers, and students and the authorities retained control by using curricula and national tests. The reform promoted several intentions that were not reached. In light of governmentality, it seemed that thoughts and intentions by the authorities differed from those in the world of practice. The quality assurances did not motivate the practitioners to be self-governing. The relationship between the authorities and the implementation actors was weak, and the reform was, therefore, difficult to implement in practice.
  • The Emerging Global Judicial Ethics: Issues and Problems
    Authors: Caroline Foulquier-Expert, Keywords: Judicial Ethics, Codes of conduct, Independence, Limits of Judgment. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1474817 Abstract: In many states around the world, actions to improve judicial ethics are developing significantly through the production of professional standards for judges. The quest to improve the ethics of judges is legitimate. However, as this development tends to be very important at the moment, some risks it presents must be highlighted. Indeed, if the objective of improving Judges’ Ethics is legitimate, it can also lead to banalization of justice, reinforcement of criticism against the judiciary and to broach incidentally the question of the limits of judgment, which is most perilous for the independence of the judiciary. This research, based on case studies, interviews with judges and an analysis of the literature on this topic (mainly from the United States of America and European Union Member States), tends to draw attention to the fact that the result of the development of these professional standards is that the ethical requirements of judges become ethical requirements of justice, which is an undesirable effect of which we must be aware, in order to prevent it.
  • The Politics of Foreign Direct Investment for Socio-Economic Development in Nigeria: An Assessment of the Fourth Republic Strategies (1999 - 2014)
    Authors: Muritala Babatunde Hassan, Keywords: Foreign capital, politics, socio-economic development, FDI attraction strategies, Redemocratization. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1317310 Abstract: In the contemporary global political economy, foreign direct investment (FDI) is gaining currency on daily basis. Notably, the end of the Cold War has brought about the dominance of neoliberal ideology with its mantra of private-sector-led economy. As such, nation-states now see FDI attraction as an important element in their approach to national development. Governments and policy makers are preoccupying themselves with unraveling the best strategies to not only attract more FDI but also to attain the desired socio-economic development status. In Nigeria, the perceived development potentials of FDI have brought about aggressive hunt for foreign investors, most especially since transition to civilian rule in May 1999. Series of liberal and market oriented strategies are being adopted not only to attract foreign investors but largely to stimulate private sector participation in the economy. It is on this premise that this study interrogates the politics of FDI attraction for domestic development in Nigeria between 1999 and 2014, with the ultimate aim of examining the nexus between regime type and the ability of a state to attract and benefit from FDI. Building its analysis within the framework of institutional utilitarianism, the study posits that the essential FDI strategies for achieving the greatest happiness for the greatest number of Nigerians are political not economic. Both content analysis and descriptive survey methodology were employed in carrying out the study. Content analysis involves desk review of literatures that culminated in the development of the study’s conceptual and theoretical framework of analysis. The study finds no significant relationship between transition to democracy and FDI inflows in Nigeria, as most of the attracted investments during the period of the study were market and resource seeking as was the case during the military regime, thereby contributing minimally to the socio-economic development of the country. It is also found that the country placed much emphasis on liberalization and incentives for FDI attraction at the neglect of improving the domestic investment environment. Consequently, poor state of infrastructure, weak institutional capability and insecurity were identified as the major factors seriously hindering the success of Nigeria in exploiting FDI for domestic development. Given the reality of the currency of FDI as a vector of economic globalization and that Nigeria is trailing the line of private-sector-led approach to development, it is recommended that emphasis should be placed on those measures aimed at improving the infrastructural facilities, building solid institutional framework, enhancing skill and technological transfer and coordinating FDI promotion activities by different agencies and at different levels of government.
  • Language Politics and Identity in Translation: From a Monolingual Text to Multilingual Text in Chinese Translations
    Authors: Chu-Ching Hsu, Keywords: Language politics and policies, literary translation, mother-tongue, multiculturalism, translator’s ideology. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1132705 Abstract: This paper focuses on how the government-led language policies and the political changes in Taiwan manipulate the languages choice in translations and what translation strategies are employed by the translator to show his or her language ideology behind the power struggles and decision-making. Therefore, framed by Lefevere’s theoretical concept of translating as rewriting, and carried out a diachronic and chronological study, this paper specifically sets out to investigate the language ideology and translator’s idiolect of Chinese language translations of Anglo-American novels. The examples drawn to explore these issues were taken from different versions of Chinese renditions of Mark Twain’s English-language novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in which there are several different dialogues originally written in the colloquial language and dialect used in the American state of Mississippi and reproduced in Mark Twain’s works. Also, adapted corpus methodology, many examples are extracted as instances from the translated texts and source text, to illuminate how the translators in Taiwan deal with the dialectal features encoded in Twain’s works, and how different versions of Chinese translations are employed by Taiwanese translators to confirm the language polices and to express their language identity textually in different periods of the past five decades, from the 1960s onward. The finding of this study suggests that the use of Taiwanese dialect and language patterns in translations does relate to the movement of the mother-tongue language and language ideology of the translator as well as to the issue of language identity raised in the island of Taiwan. Furthermore, this study confirms that the change of political power in Taiwan does bring significantly impact in language policy-- assimilationism, pluralism or multiculturalism, which also makes Taiwan from a monolingual to multilingual society, where the language ideology and identity can be revealed not only in people’s daily communication but also in written translations.
  • Alternative Dispute Resolution in the Settlement of Environmental Disputes in South Africa
    Authors: M. van der Bank, C. M. van der Bank, Keywords: Alternative dispute, environmental disputes, non-judicial, resolution and settlement. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1132693 Abstract: Alternative Dispute Resolution denotes all forms of dispute resolution other than litigation or adjudication through the courts. This definition of Alternative Dispute Resolution, however, makes no mention of a vital consideration. ADR is the generally accepted acronym for alternative dispute resolution. Despite the choice not to proceed before a court or statutory tribunal, ADR will still be regulated by law and by the Constitution. Fairness is one of the core values of the South African constitutional order. Environmental disputes occur frequently, but due to delays and costs, ADR is a mechanism to resolve this kind of disputes which is a resolution of non-judicial mechanism. ADR can be used as a mechanism in environmental disputes that are less expensive and also more expeditious than formal litigation. ADR covers a broad range of mechanisms and processes designed to assist parties in resolving disputes creatively and effectively. In so far as this may involve the selection or design of mechanisms and processes other than formal litigation, these mechanisms and processes are not intended to supplant court adjudication, but rather to supplement it. A variety of ADR methods have been developed to deal with numerous problems encountered during environmental disputes. The research questions are: How can ADR facilitate environmental disputes in South Africa? Are they appropriate? And what improvements should be made?
  • The Bright Side of Organizational Politics as a Driver of Firm Competitiveness: The Mediating Role of Corporate Entrepreneurship
    Authors: Monika Kulikowska-Pawlak, Katarzyna Bratnicka-Myśliwiec, Tomasz Ingram, Keywords: Corporate entrepreneurship, firm competitiveness organizational politics, sensemaking. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1132535 Abstract: This study seeks to contribute to the literature on firm competitiveness by advancing the perspective of organizational politics that views this process as a driver which creates identifiable differences in firm performance. The hypothesized relationships were tested on the basis of data from 355 Polish medium and large-sized enterprises. Data were analyzed using correlation analysis, EFA and robustness tests. The main result of the conducted analyses proved the coexistence, previously examined in the literature, of corporate entrepreneurship and firm performance. The obtained research findings made it possible to add organizational politics to a wide range of elements determining corporate entrepreneurship, followed by competitive advantage, in addition to antecedents such as strategic leadership, corporate culture, opportunity-oriented resource-based management, etc. Also, the empirical results suggest that four dimensions of organizational politics (dominant coalition, influence exertion, making organizational changes, and information openness) are positively related to firm competitiveness. In addition, these findings seem to underline a supposition that corporate entrepreneurship is an important mediator which strengthens the competitive effects of organizational politics.
  • Introduction to Political Psychoanalysis of a Group in the Middle East
    Authors: Seyedfateh Moradi, Abas Ali Rahbar, Keywords: Politics, political psychoanalysis, group, Middle East. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1131760 Abstract: The present study focuses on investigating group psychoanalysis in the Middle East. The study uses a descriptive-analytic method and library resources have been used to collect the data. Additionally, the researcher’s observations of people’s everyday behavior have played an important role in the production and analysis of the study. Group psychoanalysis in the Middle East can be conducted through people’s daily behaviors, proverbs, poetry, mythology, etc., and some of the general characteristics of people in the Middle East include: xenophobia, revivalism, fatalism, nostalgic, wills and so on. Members of the group have often failed to achieve Libido wills and it is very important in unifying and reproduction violence. Therefore, if libidinal wills are irrationally fixed, it will be important in forming fundamentalist and racist groups, a situation that is dominant among many groups in the Middle East. Adversities, from early childhood and afterwards, in the subjects have always been influential in the political behavior of group members, and it manifests itself as counter-projections. Consequently, it affects the foreign policy of the governments. On the other hand, two kinds of subjects are identifiable in the Middle East, one; classical subject that is related to nostalgia and mythology and, two; modern subjects which is self-alienated. As a result, both subjects are seeking identity and self-expression in public in relation to forming groups. Therefore, collective unconscious in the Middle East shows itself as extreme boundaries and leads to forming groups characterized with violence. Psychoanalysis shows important aspects to identify many developments in the Middle East; totally analysis of Freud, Carl Jung and Reich about groups can be applied in the present Middle East.
  • The Use of Facebook as a Social Media by Political Parties in the June 7 Election in Konya
    Authors: Yasemin Gülşen Yılmaz, Süleyman Hakan Yılmaz, Muhammet Erbay, Keywords: Social media, June 7 general elections, politics, Facebook. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1340134 Abstract: Social media is among the most important means of communication. Social media offers individuals and groups with an opportunity for participatory socialization over the internet, which is free of any time and place restrictions. Social media is a kind of interactive communication and bilateral social network. Various communication contents can be shared and put into mass circulation easily and quickly through social media. These sharings are not only limited to individuals but also happen to groups, institutions, and different constitutions. Their contents consist of any type of written message, audio and video files. We are living in the social media era now. It is not surprising that social media which has extensive communication facilities and massive prevalence is used in politics. Therefore, the use of social media (Facebook) by political parties during the Turkish general elections held on June 7, 2015, has been chosen as our research subject. Four parties namely, AKP, CHP, MHP and HDP who have the majority of votes in Turkey and participate in elections in Konya have been selected for our study. Their provincial centers’ and parliamentary candidates` use of social media (Facebook) on the last three days prior to the election have been examined and subjected to a qualitative analysis by means of content analysis.
  • Analyzing the Participation of Young People in Politics: An Exploratory Study Applied on Motivation in Croatia
    Authors: Valentina Piric, Maja Martinovic, Zoran Barac, Keywords: Croatia, marketing communication, motivation, politics, young people. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1129193 Abstract: The application of marketing to the domain of politics has become relevant in recent times. With this article the authors wanted to explore the issue of the current political engagement among young people in Croatia. The question is what makes young people (age 18-30) politically active in young democracies such as that of the Republic of Croatia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to discover the real or hidden motivations behind the decision to actively participate in politics among young members of the two largest political parties in the country – the Croatian Democratic Union and the Social Democratic Party of Croatia. The study expected to find that the motivation for political engagement of young people is often connected with a possible achievement of individual goals and egoistic needs such as: self-acceptance, social success, financial success, prestige, reputation, status, recognition from the others etc. It was also expected that, due to the poor economic and social situation in the country, young people feel an increasing disconnection from politics. Additionally, the authors expected to find that there is a huge potential to engage young people in the political life of the country through a proper and more interactive use of marketing communication campaigns and social media platforms, with an emphasis on highly ethical motives of political activity and their benefits to society. All respondents included in the quantitative survey (sample size [N=100]) are active in one of the two largest political parties in Croatia. The sampling and distribution of the survey occurred in the field in September 2016. The results of the survey demonstrate that in Croatia, the way young people feel about politics and act accordingly, are in fact similar to what the theory describes. The research findings reveal that young people are politically active; however, the challenge is to find a way to motivate even more young people in Croatia to actively participate in the political and democratic processes in the country and to encourage them to see additional benefits out of this practice, not only related to their individual motives, but related more to the well-being of Croatia as a country and of every member of society. The research also discovered a huge potential for political marketing communication possibilities, especially related to interactive social media. It is possible that the social media channels have a stronger influence on the decision-making process among young people when compared to groups of reference. The level of interest in politics among young Croatians varies; some of them are almost indifferent, whilst others express a serious interest in different ways to actively contribute to the political life of the country, defining a participation in the political life of their country almost as their moral obligation. However, additional observations and further research need to be conducted to get a clearer and more precise picture about the interest in politics among young people in Croatia and their social potential.